Posts

, ,

Can resimmercial design help businesses recruit staff?

A survey of 2000 UK workers by Mindspace (a co-working and collaborative workspace provider), uncovered some disconcerting opinions among employees. A surprising 16% of 18 to 24-year-olds said that they had left a job because of its poor workplace design. A further 31% of workers felt their current work environment was uninspiring, while 28% stated that their workplace is simply outdated and dull.

Another study by Office Genie in 2017, a whacking 45% of employees were frustrated at the lack of collaborative spaces in their place of work. And 20% actually stated that their work environment hindered their ability to do their job.

So how does a modern business attract, and retain, the more discerning generation of employees a.k.a. the millennials? What can office design do to improve worker happiness? Would adopting resimmercial design help with your businesses recruitment challenges?

What is resimmercial design?

The word ‘resimmercial’ is a blend of two words: residential and commercial. And this is exactly what resimmercial design is all about – blending home and work life. By creating spaces that are more home-like and less like a place of work, designers are hoping to make the office a more comfortable place to be.

Resimmercial design follows on from commercial spaces that have introduced more creativity to their premises. Sometimes, that may have been through necessity such as the “hot-desking” concept. Other reasons include wanting to change the atmosphere to make it more productive or relaxed.

Resimmercial design

Workplaces that feel more like home. Resimmercial design.

The main principles are creating spaces that feel warm, welcoming and homely plus flexibility for employees with different working preferences. This is predominantly achieved by opting for non-traditional office furniture, moving away from neutral tones and adding more natural textures into the work environment.

What are the features of resimmercial design?

Communal and casual areas

Think less “open-plan office” and more hotel lobby. These areas are lounge spaces with casual seating arrangements that are conducive to conversation. But likewise, a good resimmercial space also more secluded spots for those times when someone needs a quiet place to work.

Multi-functional spaces

By assigning less purpose to a space you allow it to adapt to the needs of the people working there. A room isn’t a meeting room because it’s just another space that could be used for a meeting. Is that a coffee bar or a standing desk? The user decides.

Soft edges and rich textures

That oh-so-typical modular office furniture is replaced with less ‘officey’ pieces often in vibrant colours or natural materials such as wood, cork or bamboo. There are more fabric coverings in a resimmercial space including tactile velvets, prints and other interesting textures. Just like all the curtains, carpets, cushions and upholstery that you would expect to find in a comfortable home.

Resimmercial design is a relaxing work environment

Resimmercial feels like you could be working whilst sitting on your sofa at home

Closer to nature

Resimmercial design often incorporates biophilic principles too. The use of plants helps to create a healthy and relaxing environment As does other natural materials such as stone and water. There may even be a fish tank (ok, that’s very “dentist’s waiting room” and nothing new but, aw, look at the fishies!).

Why choose resimmercial for your office?

An important factor that influences a millennial’s decision making, whether it is spending money or choosing a company to work for, is the ethics and authenticity of a brand or employer. Creating positive working environments shows a commitment to staff welfare above and beyond what any brochure or HR person can demonstrate. And this will be important for any prospective millennial candidate.

Once you’ve attracted talented people to your business it’s important to retain them. The cost of hiring a new employee can cost as much as what you’re paying them. Offering a flexible work environment will help to keep your employees happy and productive. Of course, flexibility must include options for not working in the office in the first place. Reducing staff turnover helps reduce the overall cost of recruitment.

Stress and the mental health of our colleagues is a serious topic. Ping pong tables and breakout areas aren’t remedies for depression. But sympathetic resimmercial design can, in part, offer a less intense working environment for anyone going through a mental illness.

Get it right and the result is fresh, valued and happy staff. And since happiness is a powerhouse, this can lead to improvements in productivity, better work/life balance and fewer sick days. It’s a win-win.

Happy workers in resimmercial office

Ok, there’s a happy worker and then there’s this guy.

Of course, this flexible, adaptable and spontaneous office design could not exist without the advent of mobile computing. WiFi and other technologies that have freed us from the standard 1.5m power cable “leash” are fueling this office place revolution. But is the idea of a progressive workplace anything new? Read our blog post on the history of office design to find out.

 

A short history of office design: evolution of the workplace

The history of office design reads almost like a history of society.

History of office design: the first office buildings

Administration is probably the second oldest profession in the world. Every ancient civilisation would have needed it and the administrators, no doubt, needed some sort of office (including the obligatory uncomfortable desk chair). The first purpose-built office building in the UK is still in use today. It’s believed to be the iconic Old Admiralty Office that stands on the banks of the River Thames in London. Built in 1726, it’s purpose was to accommodate and process the significant amount of paperwork generated by the Royal Navy. 

East India House, also in London, closely follows The Old Admiralty Office. Embracing the benefits of centralised administration, office buildings began appearing all over the capital and beyond. As you would expect from 18th century Britain, the office class system was immediate. A governmental report on office layout recommended separate rooms for more “intellectual work”. Whilst for the “more mechanical work”, a number of clerks would be housed in the same room (under the proper superintendence, naturally).

Offices of the early twentieth century

Offices were originally part of factory buildings. And they were run like factories too. Many followed the principles created by the mechanical engineer, Frank Taylor. “Taylorism” sort to maximise efficiency by filling vast open-plan offices with rows upon rows of office workers. Needless to say, his methodology lacked the human touch and those offices probably more closely resembled factory-farming than they do a modern day office.

As technology allowed skyscrapers to grow in size in the 1930s, so did the amount of office space. And this allowed for more congenial working conditions. The open plan office began to include private offices for meetings and managers plus communal spaces like kitchens and canteens. Lifts allowed buildings to go higher while electric lighting and air conditioning helped improve the worker’s experience.

Birth of the modern office

Thanks to the Great Depression and a world war, it wasn’t until the 1960s that office design really starts to embrace human interaction, however. Burolandschaft, a concept from Germany, means “office landscape”. It first grew in popularity across northern Europe before spreading to the rest of the world. Layouts were less regimented and the first significant use of office plants was seen. It’s easy to understand how modern office layout design attributes itself to Burolandschaft.

A greater variety of working spaces including communal areas, meeting rooms plus more private individual desks lead the sociable and gregarious Burolandschaft designs to morph into the Action Office(!). Women also began to enter the workforce in greater number during this period. The creation of the desk ‘modesty panel’ quickly followed.

history of office design

So much sexism, so little time

Dark times

However, the addition of autonomous and private working spaces of the Action Office lead the history of office design down a dark alley. As modular office furniture too evolved to meet office trends, the infamous office cubicle was born, nay, spawned. Cubicle farms began to more closely resemble Taylorism than Burolandschaft as the profit-over-people mentality of the 1980s peaked.

Where is office design today?

Despite an uninteresting office design period known as the 1990s, the decade did witness the dawn of the digital revolution. It was this paradigm shift that allowed employees to finally emerge from their cubicle cocoons and see sunlight for the first time in almost two decades. This is perhaps the biggest leap forward in the history of office design.

And technology continues to play the most significant role in office layout evolution. Whilst the concept of a private cubicle desk still exists today, workers are no longer confined to them because of mobile computing. The Cloud, WiFi and decent batteries allow people to work wherever they choose. 

Resimmercial design – when working from home meets open plan office – encourages comfortable and flexible working spaces that feel more like home than the office. Choices of where to work (or where not to work when on a break) can assist a person’s schedule or simply support how they are feeling that day. Collaborate and creative spaces allow teams to work together or hold meetings and presentations. Whilst secluded nooks and pods cater for more quietly productive working.

The future of office design

It’s hard to predict the future but we can learn from the past. Technology has shaped our offices just as much as how an individual’s value within society has. It is likely that a greater respect for people’s health and family life will see a flexible working revolution. In a global society with growing access to virtual and augmented realities and 3D printing, these technologies will no doubt also shape how and when we work. Or the AI overlords will rise up and we’ll back in the cubicle farms where we belong. 

 

Our most popular artificial plants and trees from Floresy

Our Most Popular Artificial Plants and Trees

Floresy stock a great choice of artificial plants and trees. But which are our most popular? Here is a rundown of our most popular artificial plants and trees for hotels, restaurants and other commercial interiors.

Artificial Ficus Tree

The Ficus or Fig Tree is a very popular product because of the different leaf patterns and sizes. From large glossy leaves to smaller, variegated leaves as shown in the gallery below, there is an artificial fig for every interior. As a result, they are popular plants for restaurants, offices and also hotels. Part of their popularity is their price. The range of artificial ficus trees at Floresy starts at only £79 for a 120cm tree. Each fig tree comes in a choice of heights and hence is the perfect solution for any situation.

Artificial Grasses

Grasses are liked because of their simplicity and tactile qualities. So for that reason, we stock a good variety of styles, sizes and price points. Grasses are a great choice for commercial interiors because they can be used in any type of design. Their upright nature is architectural and contemporary while their simplicity is neutral. Above all, it’s their association with peace and tranquillity that makes them such a popular choice. Our Bundled Carex doesn’t require pots, therefore, you avoid an additional spend. Many of the grasses also come ready to display in pots such as the zebra grass and riviera beach grasses featured below. In contrast, many of Floresy’s artificial grasses can be placed into a container of your choice to match your existing designs.

Artificial Bamboo

Ok, so bamboo is technically a grass. But it is still one of the most popular choices across the Floresy range of artificial plants and trees. Bamboos, probably even more than other grasses, bring a sense of calm to their setting. They are probably less formal in appearance than the more upright grasses and therefore have a relaxing and peaceful quality. Of course, artificial bamboo is certainly a good choice for any Asian restaurant. But likewise, they are ideal for any health or therapy business. Artificial plants and trees have the added bonus of being more hygienic than real plants. This is because you can clean them plus they are are non-allergenic. You can read more about bamboo and it’s sustainability as a wood alternative on our blog. 

Artificial Sansevieria

Artificial sansevierias, real or fake, are one of the most popular plants for interiors. They have a striking, pointy leaf shape with a subtle stripe for interest while their upright shape makes them a good space-saving option. They are particularly popular in large containers as a plant room divider. Maybe it’s because of their sword-like leaf shape? Whether you use them free-standing or on a reception or office desk, you can’t go wrong with these snake plants.

Zamioculcas

While this plant’s name may not be known by many, it’s a common sight as an artificial office plant. Like the all the most popular artificial plants and trees choices, it’s another great foliage plant. It has thick, rubbery leaves and is a native of East Africa.  Zamioculcus look great with other plants that have contrasting leaf shapes and patterns. Try choosing plants with different heights to add interest. The Floresy product ranges in size from 70cm up to 130cm in height that, therefore, make your design choices easier.

 

artificial plant zamioculcas

Zamioculcas plant by artificial plant supplier, Floresy.

 

Artificial Schefflera

A bit like the fig tree, Schefflera are a popular choice for any room. This is because of their bushy shape and rich green leaves. If you need an instant green impact, try adding a Schefflera! They add a lot of greenery for their price and size. Floresy offers Schefflera in white display pots but also as products that are ready to be added to a planter of your choice.

Artificial Dracaena

Dracaena comes in different types such as the bigger-leaved Cordyline and contrasting finer-leaved Reflexa. These plants will add a lush tropical feel to your interiors. Therefore, they are great for spas, pools or restaurants that cater to tropical cuisine. Some types even have a leaf with a red outline which is also very exotic and dramatic.

As well as all of our ready-to-buy products in our shop, Floresy offer bespoke artificial plants and trees design service. Here, we can create plants or trees to your exact dimension and colour that will therefore perfectly fit your interiors. Get in contact with us today to find out more about how Floresy can help with your interior design.

 

, ,

Benefits of Artificial plants in commercial spaces

Benefits of Artificial Plants in commercial interiors

For some, the concept of artificial or faux plants in their interiors seems counter-intuitive. Others may think of them as cheap or obviously fake. Apart from the high-quality and near-identical appearance of modern artificial plants to real plants, there are many benefits of artificial plants as well.

In addition to these benefits, plant maintenance can be a significant overhead for many hospitality businesses – especially those who opt for botanically themed interiors. Water accounts for 10% of utility bills for most hotels and that’s without the labour costs associated with plant maintenance.

Low Maintenance

Artificial plants are very nearly zero-maintenance. They do not require pruning, watering, feeding or pesticides. In fact, all you need to do is occasionally dust you artificial plants. But you need to dust natural plants too, especially big-leaved varieties.

There are no dead flowers or leaves to remove or sweep up and neither is there any soil to be spilt. Plus there is no risk of any water accidentally causing a slip hazard.

  • Low maintenance means you can reduce your overheads.

Suitable for any location

Artificial plants will tolerate any condition. Low light levels that would otherwise see off natural plants like fig trees and palms pose no issue to an artificial or faux plant.

ficus liana exotica tree

Artificial Ficus liana exotica tree from Floresy will not droop or lose its leaves.

Indoors real plants also need to be able to tolerate central heating and air conditioning which can quickly dry them out. You can place an artificial plant next to a radiator and be reassured that it will not wilt.

The benefits of artificial plants also include being able to place them in relatively inaccessible places. Such as suspending them from a ceiling or even just on a particularly high shelf. Because you do not need to water them, you can place an artificial plant where they are out of reach without making maintaining them problematic.

  • Suitability means you do not have to compromise on achieving the desired ambience for your customers.

Storable

Don’t need that artificial plant at the moment? Pop it in the cupboard until you do. Unlike their natural counterparts, you can put an artificial plant into storage until when it is needed next. Just like a Christmas tree.

This is a great benefit for venues who host events or weddings and need to be able to conveniently change layout and decor of a room for each booking.

  • Storable means the artificial plant is an asset that can be reused again and again.

Condition

Artifical plants will not shed their leaves. Their flowers will not fade. When you purchase an artificial plant from Floresy it will stay looking exactly the same all year round. It will not outgrow it’s pot not need pruning to maintain its shape.

  • Condition means that you will not have to reinvest in your plant solutions.

Flexibility

It’s much easier to move artificial plants than real ones. Artificial plants are more robust than real plants. They are also generally lighter in weight due to the planter or pot not containing soil. This portability is another one of the benefits of artificial plants.

  • Flexibility means you can more readily adapt your interiors to suit your needs.

Non-Allergenic

Whilst there are many benefits from having real plants in your spaces, it’s important to remember real plant negatives too. Some plants are triggers for allergy sufferers. Sometimes the plants themselves or the pollen their produce is the irritant. But for some people, it is the use of chemicals in the maintenance of real plants that cause the reaction.

Artificial plants are hypoallergenic. You can also sanitise them using cleanings products that you could do use on an organic plant. Because they do not require maintenance, there is no need for pesticides or insecticides either.

  • Non-allergenic means happier customers and happier employees.
artificial flower arrangements work

One of the benefits of artificial plants means no allergic reactions to flowers or pollen.

Artificial plants offer real solutions for businesses. This is either in the form of lowering their overheads or in the flexibility of using faux plants. You use them on their own to create permanent displays. Or combine them with real plants to achieve the right balance between cost, benefits and style. For more information on how artificial plants can help with your business’s interiors, please give Floresy a call on 0208 0770891

,

Houseplant trend continues with IKEA display at Chelsea

The houseplant trend continues as the RHS Chelsea Flower Show hosted IKEA’s home office display at this year’s show. The stand in the Discovery area of the Pavillion was a collaboration between IKEA and Indoor Garden Design.

Chelsea flower show houseplants ikea display

Houseplants galore at IKEA’s home office display at this year Chelsea flower show. Photograph: IKEA

The display is entitled “Plant Works” is set in an open-plan home office that includes a desk and meeting area. The objective is to show how we can create healthier and greener environments for our workspaces and not just our homes.

Naturally, the design is scandi-fantastic with clean lines, crisp whites and cool greys all allowing ‘green’ to dominate. The room is open and informal that creates a relaxed and creative atmosphere. Every conceivable space is used for planting: the desktops and surfaces display a collection of small potted ficus and Sansevieria. There are floor-standing plants of differing sizes including palms, ferns and cacti. The wall-mounted floating shelves house variegated-leaved alocasia and neat rows of phalaenopsis orchids and Bromeliaceae. One of IKEA’s peg-board style storage solutions has miniature plants stuffed into little pockets and pots. Plants are hanging from the ceiling and they are even under the wire-framed side tables.

Houseplant trend continues with orchids

Houseplant trend continues with this orchid arrangement in moss. Photograph: IKEA

Small succulent houseplant in white ceramic pot

No space is too small, no plant is too small. Photograph: IKEA

This is the second collaboration at Chelsea for IKEA and Indoor Garden Design. In 2017, their display was called ‘At home with plants’ and showcased how to use plants in bedrooms, living rooms and in bathrooms. The display featured many houseplants still riding high on this ‘outdoors indoors’ trend such as the monstera deliciosa and beautiful peace lily or Spathiphyllum.  This year’s ‘Plant Works’ continues what IKEA and Indoor Garden Design started in 2017.

Plants for living not just living rooms

Plant Works isn’t only about plants. It also contained information on the science behind how plants help boost our productivity and well-being. The scheme is really a champion of biophilic design and how it’s application creates a healthy and happy space for humans to exist in.

As the millennial generation becomes the dominant demographic in the workforce, so too do we see an increase in their work-environment preferences. Open, collaborative spaces, communal areas and desks and workstations that baulk tradition. But we are also seeing an increase in freelancers and the self-employed who’s homes are also their workplaces. 

So the lines between work and living are blurred – or should that read ‘softened’ by some well-placed foliage?

Get the look

As the houseplant trend continues so does Floresy’s offerings of high-quality artificial house plants. Faux plants are a great option for office areas as their greenery adds productivity and creativity whilst their super-low-maintenance keeps your overheads down too. So consider choosing artificial office plants for your workstation as well.

artificial plant bonsai ficus

Miniature high-quality ficus bonsai by Floresy

artificial plant floor-standing cycas palm

Artificial Cycas Palm Plant 100 cm by Floresy

sansevieria green small zoom

Bespoke green sansevieria in a grey planter by Floresy

 

artificial death valley cactus

Artificial death valley cactus succulent by Floresy

 

 

white orchid arrangement

Artificial orchids by Floresy

The above modern orchid arrangement will add peace and class to your setting. Perfect for a reception desk or other client-facing areas.

These succulents arranged in moss in white pots are perfect for a desktop, restaurant table or even the corporate bathrooms.

Mixed artificial succulents in moss by Floresy

Mixed artificial succulents in moss by Floresy

For more information on our extensive range of products for both indoors and outdoors, please visit our shop.

Biophilic Design – what is it?

Biophilic design is a concept that strives to incorporate nature into our homes, workplaces and community spaces. It embraces the connection between humans and nature by creating a harmonious space that is fulfilling yet still functional and efficient.

The awareness of biophilic design in the workplace is increasing. It comes as we acknowledge how prevalent mental health disorders and cardiovascular disease are in our western societies. The World Health Organisation predicts that these stress-related conditions will be the two biggest health problems by 2020.

The traditional designs of offices and other workplaces focus more on how cost-effective the floor space can be instead of how well people can exist in the space. Furthermore, the increase in technology-dependence and ‘screen-time’ and we lose our connection with nature for significant proportions of our lives.

Biophilic design puts the human experience and well-being at the centre of any design. It is based on the observed concept of biophilia.

What is biophilia?

Biophilia was first noted by psychoanalyst Erich Fromm in his 1973 book The Anatomy of Human Destructiveness. He described it as “the passionate love of life and of all that is alive”. The term was then popularised in the 1980s by the psychologist, Edward O Wilson, in his book, Biophilia (1984). Wilson proposed that humans innate desire to connect with nature is, in part, genetic. He observed how we were becoming disconnected from the natural world because of increases in urbanisation.

Examples of Biophilic Design

Perhaps the most famous examples of biophilic design are the creative playgrounds that global corporations like Google call ‘offices’. However, biophilic design is not limited to billion-dollar industries. Proponents of biophilic design include designers such as Oliver Heath who’s projects have included a garden school in Hackney, London.

biophilic design in an office

Google’s office in Dublin shows examples of biophilic design in the workplace.

biophilc design healthcare hospital

Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne has a large-scale aquarium in its atrium. Photograph: John Gollings

What is the WELL Building Standard?

The International WELL Building Institute (IWBI) is a leader in the global wellness movement that focuses on the ‘design, operations and behaviours’ of buildings. The standard is a holistic approach to well-being and is based on seven core concepts:

  • Air – promote clean air and reduce in sources of indoor air pollution
  • Water – provide safe and clean water for various uses
  • Nourishment – encourage better eating habits and food culture
  • Light – protect the body’s circadian system and support good sleep quality
  • Fitness – integrate physical activity into everyday life and reduce sedentary behaviours
  • Comfort – distraction-free, productive and comfortable indoor environments
  • Mind – optimise cognitive and emotional health through design and technology

Any building can apply for the WELL certification. It is a fantastic tool, especially when used to improve the well-being of the building’s occupants.

What is Sick Building Syndrome (SBS)?

Sick building syndrome is a recognised medical condition relating to poor air quality in workplaces such as offices. The symptoms include headaches, dizziness and nausea as well as irration to the eyes, nose and throat. The majority of cases are considered to be linked to flaws in a building’s air conditioning, heating and ventilation. Contamination including microbial and chemical are also factors.

Because of these factors, addressing the main causes of SBS is likely to involve a serious overall of a building’s infrastructure. However, opening windows and giving the building a good clean are the first steps in addressing problems. The introduction of plants into the building will also help with poor air quality.

What can biophilic design do for you?

There are many studies that show that biophilic design can have a positive impact. Commercial, civic and residential buildings in addition to public spaces can benefit:

  • Biophilic workplaces show increases in worker well-being of up to 13% and in productivity of up to 8%.
  • Healthcare spaces see post-operative recovery rates reduce by 8.5% and a 22% reduction in the need for pain medication.
  • Customers are willing to pay up to 12% more for goods or services when a retail unit is situated in an area with vegetation and landscaping.
  • Urban spaces with greater access to nature have less crime by around 8%.
  • Guests staying in hotel rooms with views of nature including greenery or water are willing to pay 23% more than for rooms that don’t.
  • Concentration levels, rates of attendance and test results all increase in educational spaces with biophilic elements. The negative impacts of ADHD decrease.

In a 100% organic nutshell, biophilic design can have a positive impact in so many areas of our lives. Studies have shown that the simple act of adding plants to an office can have a positive measurable effect. The mental well-being of workers improves through reductions in stress, depression and anxiety.

Floresy design services are here to help you provide the right biophilic solution for your building. The addition of the colour green will create more relaxing and calm spaces for your workers.  Plants and greenery will help improve the customer experience for your guests and clients. Contact us here so we can get started today.

,

How to use plants as room dividers

Plants are a must-have accessory for any interior but their use need not be purely decorative. Large open plan spaces such as lobbies, offices and restaurants often need to define areas or zones. This may be waiting areas, eating areas or different teams in an office. Using plants as room dividers allow spaces to be kept light and open whilst still defining the boundary.

1. Pot Plants on Free Standing Shelves

Free standing shelves pot plants

insideout.com.au plants on free-standing shelves as room dividers

insideout.com.au use multiple smaller plants on a free-standing shelf unit to create this effective room divider. The combination of the boxy lines of the shelves with the lush and leafy plants creates a definite but soft divide that maximises the greenery on display.

Light can still travel through the shelves and the space remains open and welcoming. Tantalising glimpses of what is on the other side can be had through the gaps in the leaves. Yet the physicality of the shelves keeps the zones separate.

This principle works well in an office or a restaurant area where space needs to be distinct but still remain communal and social.

free-standing shelves with potted plants creates an airy room divide

Conclusion Office by DZAP free-standing shelves with potted plants creates an airy room divider

DZAP, Heerlen fluently demonstrates the same principle in this project for Conclusion Office (as featured on retaildesignblog.net). Here, the ratio of plant to shelf space is smaller granting an even greater sense of transparency. The seating area is defined but open and remains connected to the rest of the interior.

It’s a very versatile look: swap or combine the plants with ceramics or books to change the look from leafy and fresh to thoughtful and contemplative. This style, evocative of art galleries and libraries, would also suit an urban coffee house.

Get the look:

Combine open, free-standing shelving units with Floresy’s ferns in galvanised pots. Or if capitalising on the mystery beyond the barrier interests you, why not try these herbs in glass pots that allow even more light to pass through. 


2. Low divides for seated areas

Room dividers need not be high level. In an office, where everyone is typically seated, the divide can be kept lower. This maximises the sense of space and makes for easier quick conversations over the dividers promoting communication and collaboration among workers.

This also works well for waiting areas and lobbies. Clients are able to sit and relax whilst striking the right balance between feeling suitably private but not hidden (and likely to be forgotten or missed).

This display from idealhome.co.uk uses the same principle in a living space. But the same set-up would look at home in a trendy office environment (maybe even the shoes). Plus the use of cupboards also offers much-needed storage space adding practicality to ornamentation.

Low room divider with large leaf plants

Low room divider with large leaf plants also provides storage

In this Miami hotel lounge, designed by Meyer Davis, the use of plant room dividers in the seating area is subtle but effective. Sitting on the pristine white sofas, the delicate fronds of the ferns are just high enough to give privacy. But also low enough so as to not distract from the height of the featured, painted banyan tree trunks.

 

Meyer Davis designed hotel lounge

Hotel lounge uses low planting to offer seated privacy.

Get the look:

Floresy offers many choices of plants and trees that would look great as a low-level room divider. The bushy nature of these Schefflera plants is perfect for creating screens.

Choose a low-level container to place on the ground or a trough-style planter if positioning on top of low storage furniture.

Or why not go retro with these floor standing small bamboo trees? At 120cm and in an attractive pot they are tall enough to provide a screen when seated.

 


3. Use trees to create impact and atmosphere

Often the use of trees indoors is to create a central or focal point to a lobby or other large space. But here, the small and medium-sized trees create a seating zone, offer privacy and form an attractive feature. Clusters of palms of varying height and variety create a lavish and tropical screen in this hotel lobby at the EDITION hotel, Miami. The elegant white planters reflect the white marble floors and light coloured upholstery.

Trees in hotel lobby

Miami Beach Edition lobby creates impact and atmosphere using trees.

Broad-leafed trees at Sony Music Entertainment’s Amsterdam HQ create a secluded spot in the corner of their office. The palette of greens and soft turquoises in the furnishings and planters blend to create a peaceful sea-green oasis.

The room dividers here are less of a physical barrier and offer more of a screen. So move through the trees and enter the seclusion under the canopy of exotic leaves.

Broad leafed trees and plants offer seclusion in an open plan office

Broad-leafed trees and plants offer seclusion in an open plan office

 

Get the look:

This deluxe Kentia palm tree at 225cm adds an instant tropical yet relaxed feel to an interior. Also available in smaller sizes. The palm combines beautifully with the big, waxy leaves of the Alocasia Calidora. The generous leaf size lends itself to creating privacy. Finish the look with a selection of stylish containers from Floresy’s range of planters and pots.

Plant Pot Ideas

The entrance to your office, hotel or restaurant is an important showcase for your business. It communicates to passers-by – your potential customers – your brand, your style and even your niche.

When you have an avenue or approach to your premises, you have space and scope to display your style, taste and quality of your establishment. But when your entrance is direct from the street, making a definite statement about who you are can be more of a challenge.

A great solution to this problem is using plant pots to add character and definition to your entrance way.

Plant pot ideas

The range of plant pot styles, textures and colours are almost endless. Pots can add height to a display. They also offer convenience as they can be moved around and adapted to different styles and as the seasons change.

Metallic pots

Galvanised metal pots are tough, rust-resistant containers. Far from the shiny metallic look, this type of pot has a worn, aged and weathered look that would suit a period property. Conversely, this style of pot will also suit a venue with an industrial design.

Titanium zinc plant pot style ideas

Titanium zinc planters from outer-eden.co.uk are galvanised for rust-resistance.

Copper is on trend. When used as an outdoor plant pot, however, the copper will eventually succumb to the weather and turn green. Whilst this verdigris adds a wonderful patina to the copper, it won’t be the shiny, polished copper look that is so current. A good solution would be to use pots painted in a metallic copper paint instead or these copper plated galvanised pots from wayfair.com. 

Hammered Copper plant pot style ideas

Hammered copper-plated galvanised iron pots have a mid-sheen finish.

 

Stoneware and terracotta

Stone can be ancient, period, rustic or contemporary. It’s pretty much fully-weatherproof and will last a lifetime. But they are heavy and therefore not so easy to move. 

entrance to the hotel plant pot style ideas

These stone pots at the entrance to a hotel suit the age of the building whilst their clean lines remain contemporary.

Terracotta pots, however, are lighter in weight but need to be treated to be frost-hardy. They are also more porous than stone, metal or plastic pots meaning that the soil will dry out quicker and your plants will need more watering. Terracotta can be painted or glazed to add even more colour. 

terracotta plant pot ideas

Glazed pots add colour and can help reduce water-evaporation through the terracotta

 

If space is a real premium, this windowbox presentation of terracotta pots is a great solution. It adds character and colour without taking up any floor space. 

Window box plant pot ideas

A window box is the perfect space-saving solution. Consider using lightweight planters.

 

 

Plastic plant pot ideas

Plastic pots must be the go-to choice for any designer who needs a quick, cheap and all-round functional plant pot. Just like Floresy’s high-quality artificial plants that are near identical to the real thing, plastic pots can be indistinguishable from other materials. 

Metallic looking plastic pot

terracotta effect plastic plant pot ideas

Terracotta look plastic pot

wood-effect plastic plant pot ideas

Wood-effect plastic pot

 

 Pots with a difference

Imagine these planters outside a restaurant or bar. Even at the front of an office – what an impact! These planters are both a lighting and planting solution and show how a setting can be transformed at night time using light. A great option for a business that trades at both day and nighttime.

entrance to the hotel, office restaurant

Plant pot ideas – a plant pot that is also a light?

Of course, you are not limited to using a shop-bought, purpose-made planter of any kind. Match the planter to your business for instant humour and character. 

shoes as alternative plant pot ideas

A shoe shop?

Chest of drawers as a plant pot idea

For a furniture restored or second-hand furniture shop?

bicycle as alternative plant pot ideas

A bicycle shop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reusing something from your business is also a great cost-saving option. Be creative!

Artificial plants in pots

Whilst natural planting in pots require higher maintenance due to the amount of watering they require, planting in pots offers great flexibility. The solution to the watering problem is to use artificial plants. Another benefit of using artificial plants is that you can use them even if the light conditions are poor or your climate doesn’t suit your plant choice.

If you’d like any further inspiration on how to decorate the hotel entrance with the plant & pot decoration – contact us. Our passion and years of experience will enable us to create and implement any project. You can also find out more information about our artificial plants and flowers by going to Artificial Plants for Restaurants.