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Why do our brains like high ceilings?

High ceilings are a highly desirable architectural feature. But why? And what’s so bad about normal ceiling heights?

We like high ceilings because of their association with grand interiors or properties from certain periods, such as houses from the Georgian era. Walking into a hotel lobby with lofty ceilings will add anticipation of just how luxury your guest experience will be. And a cathedral’s vaulted ceiling will raise your eyes, and thoughts, to heaven.

But likewise, high ceilings can make a room feel cold or empty. The room may lack warmth or make you feel uncomfortable and exposed. A large foyer in an office building can feel intimidating or clinical. Or maybe the room just lacks the appropriate proportions to warrant a high ceiling and therefore feels ‘wrong’.

There have been several studies that have looked at our relationship with ceilings height. One suggests that we find high ceilings more beautiful because we associate them with freedom. Whereas lower ceilings seem to stimulate better decision making perhaps in response to feeling confined and in need of an exit strategy.

This is all because of a concept called ‘priming‘ which activates different thought-processing in the brain. In other words, ceiling height can change how we think.

The upshot of this information is that both high ceilings and ceilings of a normal height can be beneficial to a workplace or retailer, depending on how you want to workers or customers to behave.

Use ceiling height to create different working environments or to influence how we want our customers to behave.

Hotels may want to promote a sense of freedom and escapism for their customers, with high ceilings inspiring the possibilities of their stay. Retailers may also want their customers to feel inspired but would a more typical ceiling height encourage decision making and lead to a purchase better?

An ideal office environment would offer different spaces for when a worker needs to be creative and expansive in their thinking, perhaps problem-solving with colleagues. But when that report’s deadline is looming, getting your head down in a lower-ceiling environment could help improve focus.

How to make your ceiling look higher

  • Draw the eye to the highest point by hanging curtains/blinds at the top of the wall, not just the top of the window.
  • Choose furniture with a low profile. Avoid high back sofas and chairs. Low-profile will create a greater expanse of space between the top of the furniture and the ceiling. Conversely, you can include high profile pieces such as a tall shelving unit. This contrast of height with your low profile seating will also create a similar sense of expansive space.
  • Paint your ceiling the same colour as the walls. Lighter colours work better but so do gloss paints as they will reflect the light making the ceiling feel higher.
  • Avoid clutter and overfilling a room as this detracts from the sense of space.

How to make your ceiling look lower

  • Use darker colours on the ceiling. If you combine this with a picture rail at you desired ceiling height, paint the walls the same colour as the ceiling down to this rail.
  • Hang suspended lighting at lower heights to bring the focus down from the ceiling height. You can use this same trick with hanging/trailing plants.
  • Bigger furniture will fill a room with a high ceiling and give a better sense of scale.

Plants are a great way to emphasise an area that you want to draw focus to. You can use tall plants to raise the eye-line or to create contrast with low-profile furniture. Wall-mounted displays can also define the height of a room and hanging plants can be used to create a floating ceiling at whatever height you wish. Floor-standing pots with bushy foliage are a great way to keep the focus lower.

Floresy offers exciting solutions to your interior needs. Get in touch today.

 

 

What is Interior Landscaping?

Interior landscaping is an expression in use by many interior designers who work exclusively with indoor planting schemes to describe what they do. You’ve probably heard of landscaping – the physical process of reshaping the land. Hard landscaping refers to structures such as walls, pergolas, patios and even follies. Soft landscaping is the term for the planting within the landscaped garden.

So, interior landscaping is a bit of an oxymoron. Afterall, there isn’t any land to be ‘scaped! Instead, it is the process of adding plants and greenery to work with the angles, dimensions and light inside buildings and internal structures. Perhaps ‘plantscaping‘ or ‘interiorscaping‘ are more accurate terms. All three of these expressions are rather interchangeable with businesses and designers using them to describe their own unique services.

Despite sounding trendy, the term has been in popular use within the industry for a considerable amount of time. The terms emerged in the 1970s following the publication of Richard Gain’s book ‘Interior Plantscaping‘. Some people choose to use the term exclusively for interior spaces will others use them to describe gardens within buildings.

Interior landscaping is the design and possible implementation of a planting scheme that compliments an interior space. It isn’t the maintenance of those plants although some companies will offer both these services. It also is less about a potted plant of your desk but more about structural planting that works directly with architectural details of a building. 

Examples of Interior Landscaping

Done properly, you probably won’t notice that an interior has been ‘plantscaped‘. We expect interiors in hotels, shopping centres or business foyers to have a certain look and feel.

A popular interior feature is the Green Wall or Living Walls. Usually imposing and certainly spectacular, green walls are plants grown vertically such as this example from Biotecture for Centrica’s office in Windsor.

Interior landscaping of a green wall

Interior landscaping includes impressive installations like his green wall

For large interior spaces – those with considerable ceiling height – using tall indoor plants, such as trees can be just as spectacular. Trees are ultimately architectural plants due to their size. And trees indoors certainly have the wow-factor.

Interior trees can be difficult to maintain due to how very, very thirsty they can be. Some have extensive roots systems that extend out from the trunk for almost as far as the tree is tall. So the solution is to use certain species that could be grown in containers. Or, the alternative solution to this problem is to use tall artificial plants and artificial trees indoors.

Faux Artificial interior tree

Bespoke artificial trees match your individual requirements

How does Interior Landscaping benefit me?

Interior landscaping offers the same benefits as any interior styling. Without a planting scheme, a room or building may seem off or cold and clinical. But, hey, if cold and clinical is your brand – go with that. Interiorscaping is more obvious when it is missing. Here are some of the benefits of interior landscaping:

Brand

Help define who you are and what you do from the moment someone walks into your shop or lobby. Plants and their containers can add humour, elegance or even a tropical vibe.

Ambience

The atmosphere is important in any setting. A structured, neat and uniform planting scheme will add a professional and serious note to an office or lobby. Softer planting can help people feel more relaxed and less anxious which is a great thing in a dentists waiting room.

Function

Plants can help define a room’s function: Lines of container plants will define doorways or walkways. Add discretion and privacy to areas for seating and talking by using the plants as screens or room dividers.

Wellness

Many studies conclude how important connection to nature is. It has a direct impact on the overall wellness and happiness of people working in any environment. Plants help add the greenery needed for that connection. The wellness experienced by workers leads to increases in productivity and fewer sick days.

Noice reduction

Big open spaces are echoey. You can help improve the acoustics of large spaces by adding a planting to dampen the sounds. This is great for open-plan offices and hotel lobbies. But also for busy restaurants. Less so for libraries.

Interested in learning more? Check out these posts on the benefits of artificial plants in commercial spaces and biophilic design.

Floresy has an interior landscaping offering as part of our bespoke services. By working closely with you, we will use our knowledge and experience to design a scheme that works for and for your space. Contact us today for more information on how we can help.

 

 

Our most popular artificial plants and trees from Floresy

Our Most Popular Artificial Plants and Trees

Floresy stock a great choice of artificial plants and trees. But which are our most popular? Here is a rundown of our most popular artificial plants and trees for hotels, restaurants and other commercial interiors.

Artificial Ficus Tree

The Ficus or Fig Tree is a very popular product because of the different leaf patterns and sizes. From large glossy leaves to smaller, variegated leaves as shown in the gallery below, there is an artificial fig for every interior. As a result, they are popular plants for restaurants, offices and also hotels. Part of their popularity is their price. The range of artificial ficus trees at Floresy starts at only £79 for a 120cm tree. Each fig tree comes in a choice of heights and hence is the perfect solution for any situation.

Artificial Grasses

Grasses are liked because of their simplicity and tactile qualities. So for that reason, we stock a good variety of styles, sizes and price points. Grasses are a great choice for commercial interiors because they can be used in any type of design. Their upright nature is architectural and contemporary while their simplicity is neutral. Above all, it’s their association with peace and tranquillity that makes them such a popular choice. Our Bundled Carex doesn’t require pots, therefore, you avoid an additional spend. Many of the grasses also come ready to display in pots such as the zebra grass and riviera beach grasses featured below. In contrast, many of Floresy’s artificial grasses can be placed into a container of your choice to match your existing designs.

Artificial Bamboo

Ok, so bamboo is technically a grass. But it is still one of the most popular choices across the Floresy range of artificial plants and trees. Bamboos, probably even more than other grasses, bring a sense of calm to their setting. They are probably less formal in appearance than the more upright grasses and therefore have a relaxing and peaceful quality. Of course, artificial bamboo is certainly a good choice for any Asian restaurant. But likewise, they are ideal for any health or therapy business. Artificial plants and trees have the added bonus of being more hygienic than real plants. This is because you can clean them plus they are are non-allergenic. You can read more about bamboo and it’s sustainability as a wood alternative on our blog. 

Artificial Sansevieria

Artificial sansevierias, real or fake, are one of the most popular plants for interiors. They have a striking, pointy leaf shape with a subtle stripe for interest while their upright shape makes them a good space-saving option. They are particularly popular in large containers as a plant room divider. Maybe it’s because of their sword-like leaf shape? Whether you use them free-standing or on a reception or office desk, you can’t go wrong with these snake plants.

Zamioculcas

While this plant’s name may not be known by many, it’s a common sight as an artificial office plant. Like the all the most popular artificial plants and trees choices, it’s another great foliage plant. It has thick, rubbery leaves and is a native of East Africa.  Zamioculcus look great with other plants that have contrasting leaf shapes and patterns. Try choosing plants with different heights to add interest. The Floresy product ranges in size from 70cm up to 130cm in height that, therefore, make your design choices easier.

 

artificial plant zamioculcas

Zamioculcas plant by artificial plant supplier, Floresy.

 

Artificial Schefflera

A bit like the fig tree, Schefflera are a popular choice for any room. This is because of their bushy shape and rich green leaves. If you need an instant green impact, try adding a Schefflera! They add a lot of greenery for their price and size. Floresy offers Schefflera in white display pots but also as products that are ready to be added to a planter of your choice.

Artificial Dracaena

Dracaena comes in different types such as the bigger-leaved Cordyline and contrasting finer-leaved Reflexa. These plants will add a lush tropical feel to your interiors. Therefore, they are great for spas, pools or restaurants that cater to tropical cuisine. Some types even have a leaf with a red outline which is also very exotic and dramatic.

As well as all of our ready-to-buy products in our shop, Floresy offer bespoke artificial plants and trees design service. Here, we can create plants or trees to your exact dimension and colour that will therefore perfectly fit your interiors. Get in contact with us today to find out more about how Floresy can help with your interior design.

 

Is bamboo sustainable for use in interior design?

The driving force behind any construction material is how cost-effective it is. Sadly this often results in practices that exploit the environment including the people used in the production process. With growing concerns over the impact of humans on our environment, bamboo is potentially one of the success stories. But is bamboo sustainable enough?

Why is bamboo sustainable?

Bamboo is a fast-growing plant. Incredibly, some species grow up to 1.2m per day! The plants can reach a harvestable height within 3-5 years. So whilst wood is still a renewable resource, trees used in the timber industry will take between 20 and 60 years to reach suitable felling heights. Bamboo has a higher yield because it “outgrows” trees.

When you cut down a tree for its wood, you kill the tree. When you cut down bamboo, it continues to grow as the base and roots remain intact. This helps prevent soil erosion often associated with deforestation. The continual growth of bamboo also means it is continually taking carbon from the atmosphere. Plus bamboo forests spew out more oxygen than hardwood forests by 30%.

Bamboo happily grows in inaccessible areas where it wouldn’t be possible to farm timber such as slopes and smaller plots of land. It grows in abundance across Asia and is sometimes seen as a problem plant because of its fast-growing and prolific nature. Furthermore, growing bamboo in its natural habitat means its production also has a much smaller impact on the local ecosystem including no requirement for irrigation or fertiliser.

Because of its suitability for small-scale farming, bamboo also supports local economies and their small, independent farmers. Communities are safe from deforestation or exploitation by logging corporations as well. Bamboo can be cut by hand eliminating the need for energy-consuming machinery.

Bamboo also has potential as a biofuel. It is a high-carbon material and so is an obvious choice for converting into a biofuel. India is leading the way by using bamboo as a biofuel due to the plant’s abundance in its northern region. Whilst its use as a fuel is still in an experimental stage, it has the potential to contribute to greener fuels industries.

How does bamboo compare to hardwood as a material?

Bamboo is waterproof meaning it is easier to clean and has better stain-resistance than hardwood. This is a great plus when using bamboo as wooden flooring. Whilst all wood has antibacterial properties, bamboo is particularly so making it “cleaner” overall when compared to normal wood.

Hardness is an important factor when considering a construction material. For wooden flooring, the hardness of the wood effects how durable the flooring is. The hardness of wood comes from its fibre density. Hardness is measured using the Janka Hardness Test. This equates to the force required to embed a steel ball half its diameter into the wood.

Natural bamboo has a hardness of 1300-1400 which is comparable to birch (1260), beech (1300) and oak (1360). Carbonised bamboo (heat treated to darken its natural colour) has a hardness of 1000-1100 which is still hard than pine (870).

Bamboo scaffolding is the norm across China but bamboo can even be an alternative to steel for reinforcing concrete. So regardless of the question is bamboo sustainable, it’s certainly extremely versatile.

Bamboo sustainable alternative wood

Is bamboo a real alternative to wood?

What are the environmental impacts of bamboo?

Bamboo cannot be grown on a significant, sustainable scale outside of Asia so all of the bamboo products in use in the West are imported. Around 80% of bamboo is grown in China, so there is the emission cost in transporting it around the globe to Europe and the USA. However, the environmental impact of shipping bamboo across the Pacific may not appear all that bad. It is comparable with logging transportation across the Americas, including within the USA itself.

Asia has less regulation than western nations regarding the use of pesticides and other chemicals used in the farming process.

With the demand for bamboo increasing so too is the financial temptation. Local farmers may choose to destroy local habitats in order to increase bamboo growth opportunities.

When asking is bamboo sustainable, it isn’t just the growing and harvesting that requires consideration. The ease with which the material can be transformed into a usable product is important too. As bamboo is a slender plant it requires additional processing to create planks. Timber can quickly be cut into ready-to-use planks. Bamboo needs to be glued together and that requires an adhesive – which is an additional chemical. There is also an additional energy cost to consider especially if the bamboo is carbonised to create a darker shade. However, there is less wastage unlike when turning timber into planks.

Bamboo as a textile is a bad idea due to the significant chemical use in its production.

There is no official grading system for the quality of bamboo used in flooring or furniture so quality-control of a final product may also be an issue. You can look for the FSC logo on a bamboo product which will mean that it has come from a more sustainable source.

Conclusion

Whilst there will always be an impact with using natural resources, it’s important to understand the relative impact each material has so we can limit or even mitigate the environmental costs. So, is bamboo sustainable? Well, it can be and where you are on the planet is a big factor. The use of bamboo in western countries may ease the rate of destruction of the rainforest in South America. But if all it does is shift the deforestation to other places on the planet, then there is no real benefit. As with any natural resource, it needs proper management otherwise it will become no different to the hardwood forests.

Discover ideas for using bamboo plants in your interiors from our blog post artificial bamboo tree inspiration.

Add a new dimension with trailing plants

Trailing plants are a great solution for adding greenery when space is a premium. Most plants can be suspended in hanging baskets or placed on a shelf such as the herbs and succulents featured in Floresy’s collaboration at Aneto Deli. But for a more wild, botanical look, why not try a trailing plant instead? Trailing plants will bring a softness – or even some wildness – to your interior decor.

trailing plants hanging from ceiling in a scandi bedroom

Trailing plants can be is displayed in the smallest of spaces whist not taking up valuable floor space.

A trailing plant hanging from the ceiling will emphasise the height of a ceiling. Also, placing a trailing plant on a high shelf will likewise emphasise the expanse of a wall. Conversely, where the ceiling height is disproportionate to the size of the room an array of trailing plants will lower the effective height of a ceiling. This eatery – Hammer & Tong 412 in Melbourne – does just that to create a more intermate setting.

Ceiling hanging trailing plants

Hammer & Tong 412 in Melbourne uses hanging vines to create a more intimate atmosphere.

How to display trailing plants

Hanging baskets

Long before living walls, there were hanging baskets. For the classic cottage garden look, it is hard to beat a traditional basket stuffed full of colourful flowers such as fuschias and lobelias. Perfect for an English pub garden.

trailing fuchsia in a hanging basket

An unashamed display of trailing fuchsia in a hanging basket. Photo: Pinterest

For indoors, a retro revival is the macrame or crochet hanging basket such as this plant hanger from Modern Macrame. Slip the potted plant inside the knotted rope hanger –  make sure the pot is attractive too. Most hangers of this style allow two or three plants to be stacked on top of each other and even small or low-level plants can be used to add height to an interior scheme.

Macrame plant hanger for trailing plants

Even small plants can add height using a plant hanger.

Trailing plants on shelves

Shelves will allow you to show the length of any trailing plant off to its maximum effect. In this display, the long, graceful plants balance the boxiness of the small display shelves. The trailing leaves break up the structured lines of the boxes. The images of the still life and green bird all contribute to the botanical theme.

Trailing plants on display box shelves artificial plants

Trailing plants on display box shelves

Here, the Hotel Armour use a dense display of trailing and upright plants to create a rich and vibrant look. The trailing leaves from one shelf spill over the plants on the shelf below. The display uses only a few varieties of plants and only foliage to slightly tame this otherwise wild look.

 

Trailing plants as living wall artificial plants

Hotel Amour creates their take on a living wall using selves and trailing plants. Photo by LostNCheeseland on Flickr

Window boxes

 

 

Trailing plants in a window box

Trailing plants in an old-school window box

Get the look with Floresy products

Floresy stock a wide selection of plants suitable for creating a hanging display. Products, such as this Ivy or Hedera, is a great choice for a more traditional theme and can be used inside or outside. Floresy makes ivy in two leaf styles – this long green 130cm product as shown below – or a white/green variegated leaf ivy.

long green ivy artificial plant trailing plant by Floresy

Artificial long green trailing ivy 130cm by Floresy

Succulents are very on trend. Try smaller plants in a hanging display such as these succulents in dark grey pots. These would work well in a contemporary or understated interior theme because of their neutral asthetic.

artificial succulents mix in dark grey pot

Artificial succulent mix in contemporary dark grey pots

A popular choice of trailing plant to display on a shelf is this variety of succulent. The Schlumbergera Truncata Floresy plant product comes in white ceramic pots and is the perfect length to add to an existing shelf because it isn’t too long. They will look great as a display at a reception desk area.  

succulent in ceramic pot cactus artificial

Succulent in ceramic pot cactus

 

This trailing succulent is known as the ‘fishhook’ plant or banana vine however its Latin name is Senecio radicans. Its tangle of leaves works well in any botanical theme whereas its length is perfect for display on a shelf or suspended.

Artificial succulent plant trailing plant banana vine

Artificial succulent fishhook or banana vine by Floresy

 

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Houseplant trend continues with IKEA display at Chelsea

The houseplant trend continues as the RHS Chelsea Flower Show hosted IKEA’s home office display at this year’s show. The stand in the Discovery area of the Pavillion was a collaboration between IKEA and Indoor Garden Design.

Chelsea flower show houseplants ikea display

Houseplants galore at IKEA’s home office display at this year Chelsea flower show. Photograph: IKEA

The display is entitled “Plant Works” is set in an open-plan home office that includes a desk and meeting area. The objective is to show how we can create healthier and greener environments for our workspaces and not just our homes.

Naturally, the design is scandi-fantastic with clean lines, crisp whites and cool greys all allowing ‘green’ to dominate. The room is open and informal that creates a relaxed and creative atmosphere. Every conceivable space is used for planting: the desktops and surfaces display a collection of small potted ficus and Sansevieria. There are floor-standing plants of differing sizes including palms, ferns and cacti. The wall-mounted floating shelves house variegated-leaved alocasia and neat rows of phalaenopsis orchids and Bromeliaceae. One of IKEA’s peg-board style storage solutions has miniature plants stuffed into little pockets and pots. Plants are hanging from the ceiling and they are even under the wire-framed side tables.

Houseplant trend continues with orchids

Houseplant trend continues with this orchid arrangement in moss. Photograph: IKEA

Small succulent houseplant in white ceramic pot

No space is too small, no plant is too small. Photograph: IKEA

This is the second collaboration at Chelsea for IKEA and Indoor Garden Design. In 2017, their display was called ‘At home with plants’ and showcased how to use plants in bedrooms, living rooms and in bathrooms. The display featured many houseplants still riding high on this ‘outdoors indoors’ trend such as the monstera deliciosa and beautiful peace lily or Spathiphyllum.  This year’s ‘Plant Works’ continues what IKEA and Indoor Garden Design started in 2017.

Plants for living not just living rooms

Plant Works isn’t only about plants. It also contained information on the science behind how plants help boost our productivity and well-being. The scheme is really a champion of biophilic design and how it’s application creates a healthy and happy space for humans to exist in.

As the millennial generation becomes the dominant demographic in the workforce, so too do we see an increase in their work-environment preferences. Open, collaborative spaces, communal areas and desks and workstations that baulk tradition. But we are also seeing an increase in freelancers and the self-employed who’s homes are also their workplaces. 

So the lines between work and living are blurred – or should that read ‘softened’ by some well-placed foliage?

Get the look

As the houseplant trend continues so does Floresy’s offerings of high-quality artificial house plants. Faux plants are a great option for office areas as their greenery adds productivity and creativity whilst their super-low-maintenance keeps your overheads down too. So consider choosing artificial office plants for your workstation as well.

artificial plant bonsai ficus

Miniature high-quality ficus bonsai by Floresy

artificial plant floor-standing cycas palm

Artificial Cycas Palm Plant 100 cm by Floresy

sansevieria green small zoom

Bespoke green sansevieria in a grey planter by Floresy

 

artificial death valley cactus

Artificial death valley cactus succulent by Floresy

 

 

white orchid arrangement

Artificial orchids by Floresy

The above modern orchid arrangement will add peace and class to your setting. Perfect for a reception desk or other client-facing areas.

These succulents arranged in moss in white pots are perfect for a desktop, restaurant table or even the corporate bathrooms.

Mixed artificial succulents in moss by Floresy

Mixed artificial succulents in moss by Floresy

For more information on our extensive range of products for both indoors and outdoors, please visit our shop.

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4 (and a half) Plants with Big Leaves

As we increasingly bring nature into our interiors, foliage is set to be an ongoing trend. So plants with big leaves are popular as they add a big dollop of green in one dose. Plants with big leaves can be clustered with other plants for a tropical or sumptuous feel. However, they can also stand alone and still have an impact. Big leaves are often unfussy and simple therefore give the plant a clean and uncluttered look. This means they suit many modern interiors especially those tending towards minimalism.

There are many choices of indoor plants with big leaves, ranging from trees to the humble houseplant. Here is our guide to some popular options for your interiors.

1. Plants with Big Leaves – Ficus

Fig trees or Ficus come in a wide variety of leaf and trunk variations. They are relatively easy to care for which makes them a popular indoor tree (although they are also known for losing their leaves). The beauty of using a tree over a bushier plant is the floor space remains more open and keeps the room feeling less cluttered.

Big Leaf Ficus in hallway

A pair of big-leaved Ficus in the hallway. Design by Sarah Baynes.

A popular choice from Floresy is this big-leaved ficus with green/white variegated leaves.

Premium Big White-Green Leaves Ficus

Premium Big White-Green Leaves Ficus

2. Anthurium

At first glance, the wet-looking, flesh-red of the anthurium flower suggests this plant could be a carnivore. It isn’t. It’s just a very distinctive houseplant with super-shiny leaves and a long-lasting ‘flowers’. The red part is actually a modified leaf or ‘bract’. It’s the yellow/white spike that contains spirals of tiny, densely-packed flowers.

Anthuriums are native to the Americas and so they have a vibrant, tropical feel. They are a great choice if you want plants with big leaves on a smaller surface such as desk or shelf. They come in a variety of colours ranging from white through a variety of pinks. But the most common is the blood red.

Anthurium with it's distinctive red flowers.

Anthurium with it’s distinctive red flowers.

Whilst the natural form of Anthuriums have fantastic air-purifying abilities, they are also poisonous. To avoid this toxic issue, you could consider an artificial anthurium such as this one from Floresy.

Red Anthurium in Pot

Anthurium by Floresy has large, tactile waxy leaves.

3. Alocasia Calidora

Nothing says “Hello, I’m a plant with big leaves” like an Alocasia. One of the bigger-leafed varieties is nickname ‘elephant ears’ for obvious reasons. These impressive plants need a bright position to thrive indoors so are best suited to sunny rooms and conservatories. Rooms with skylights are also suitable due to the increased light available.

Alocasia plants with big leaves interiors

Something witty or observational about Alocasia Calidora

Alocasia varieties include those with variegated leaves such as this artificial option from Floresy: 

alocasia plants with big leaves foliage display

Big, but not that big…

Alocasias are a fantastic choice for any interior. Available in a range of sizes, they are effectively design-neutral and so will fit into any decor. This classic, mid-green, wide-leafed artificial Alocasia by Floresy will bring fresh foliage to any room.

alocasia calidora plants with big leaves indoor foliage artificial plants

Artificial Alocasia Calidora in various sizes

4. Peace lily

The peace lily or spathiphyllum is an elegant and attractive plant that is a perfect choice for a desk or sunny windowsill. Being a smaller plant than some of the others on this list, it’s leaves aren’t as big. But their shape and texture are certainly evocative of the Alocasia. Like the Anthurium, they have a modified leaf that enhances the size of the delicate white flowers.

Peace Lily Indoor Plants with big leaves

Sergeant Angel’s favourite plant

artificial Spathiphyllum peace lily for interiors

Artificial peace lily by Floresy. Small, but with leaves that punch above their weight.

4.5. Rubber Tree Plant

Here’s the half:

The rubber tree is a really only a variety of the Ficus that features above. The clue is in its Latin name: Ficus Elastica. It is known for it’s large, dark green leaves and is a design icon of 1970’s interiors. Despite its groovy heritage, it has actually featured in our interiors since the Victorian era.

Rubber Tree Plants with big leaves

The rubber tree is at home in 1970’s interiors as it is any contemporary setting.

The rubber tree plant looks great in the sunny rooms with rattan furniture, as shown above in this image from Guiade Jardineria. Equally, this big-leaf plant will suit a dark and moody Victorian gentleman’s study (so great if you’re into Steampunk). If your setting does suffer from low natural light-levels, however, an artificial rubber tree from Floresy is a good solution.

Artificial rubber tree plant with big leaves by Floresy.

Artificial rubber tree plant with big leaves by Floresy.

Floresy stock a wide range of plants with big leaves plus some plants with more delicate leaves too. Visit our shop to view our extensive range.

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6 Hotel room design mistakes to avoid

A hotel room has to work hard. It has to offer good looks, comfort, practicality and a home-from-home for your guests. Whilst at the same time be cost-effective to maintain in order to earn its keep. But when it comes to striking a balance between form and function, there are common design mistakes that any hotel room can fall foul of.

1. Bad lighting

Few of us still sleep with the lights on but bad lighting can seriously cast a shadow on your guest experience. Rooms benefit from multiple light sources that allow guests to change the overall brightness to meet their own preferences. And controlling the lighting needs to be at your guest’s convenience too. Make sure the bedside lamps aren’t too bright and that the controls can be easily reached from the bed. And completely ditch any fluorescent lights – they were ever not a design mistake?

Hotel room with only one bedside table and light

Only one bedside table and light – but what about the guest sleeping on the left?

2. Bold colours that are not restful

It’s great to be able to make a design statement in a room, especially using colours that are on trend. But overuse of bright, powerful colours will not help your guests get a restful night’s sleep. If your chosen theme colour is bright or bold, use it sparingly. Consider using it in throw cushions, lampshade and in wall art. Also, you could choose a patterned curtain fabric that includes the colour in smaller amounts.

Red hotel bedroom accent

Ham Yard Hotel in London uses a very stimulating red but as an accent colour.

3. Oversized furniture or too much furniture

We’ve all been there. Bought that amazing super-king bed that we saw in the store and now you can’t open your wardrobe doors. Even generously sized rooms will feel cramped if they are full of furniture. Floor space is key. For smaller bedrooms, consider a smaller double bed. Alternatively, make each item of furniture earn its keep by having more than one function. For example, a bedside that is also a desk or a dressing table that is also a TV stand. If something can be wall-mounted do so, it frees up the floor giving a greater sense of space.

Clear surfaces and floor area creates space

So many great space-saving ideas such as the long wall shelf keep floor space and surface’s clear. Image from domino.com

4. Lack of technology

You’ve installed free wifi throughout your hotel and you’re patting yourself on the back. If technology was a guest room – you’ve just added the bed. Today’s travellers – especially millennials – expect more than access to wifi which is now considered a necessity. A common hotel room design mistake is insufficient charging sockets as multiple devices may need to be plugged-in simultaneously. With the number of connectable devices growing from two billion in 2006 to a predicted 200 billion by 2020, hotels cannot afford to not invest in greater room technology. Hotel apps that allow personalisation of temperature, lighting and interaction with other hotel’s facilities are fast becoming must-have hotel tech. The Marriott City Centre hotel knows how to do it.

Hotel room design mistakes with technology don't happen at Marriott

Marriott City Centre hotel in Charlotte, USA is an industry-leader for hotel tech. Rooms include Bluetooth connectivity for TV plus room key apps.

5. Clutter

When a guest comes to stay with you, they need to feel welcomed and accommodated. Part of that comes from having somewhere to put their belongings. Clear surfaces are more inviting and tell the guest that room is theirs to use. It might only be a phone and a toothbrush. But if the room is full of brochures, tea & coffee making facilities, lamps and potted plants, the result is a feeling of being unwanted. And that’s a big design mistake.

Radisson Blu Hotel Room

No design mistakes at the Radisson Blu in Schipol: subdued colour scheme with a bold accent, multiple light sources and all those clear surfaces… Design & images property of Creneau International

6. Looks over comfort

Achieving the wow-factor with hotel room design is what we want. It creates a memorable stay for your guests and really enhances their customer experience. However, if that fabulous-looking armchair is so low to the ground that it’s uncomfortable to sit on, what is it for? The fifteen throw cushions on the bed look sumptuous and inviting. But how practical is it for your guests to have to shove them off the bed to lie down. Not to mention the laundry bill! The panel curtains are in an exquisite print but don’t completely cover the window. The wow-factor will lose its value if the bedroom simply does not perform to the same expectation as the looks suggest. These are over-design mistakes. A trend rising alongside the millennial market is for simpler room design. Comfort without fuss.

Simple hotel room design

At the end of the day, it’s all about the bed.

Let Floresy contribute to your good hotel room design with our floral design service.

Amazing Designs using Interior Trees

The last place you expect to find a tree is indoors. Except of course in stunning interiors! A design that incorporates interior trees will make their guests feel welcome and ever-so-special. The addition of an interior tree will have the wow-factor for the very reasons that they are an unexpected addition to a room. Lavish botanicals will create an atmosphere completely different from the street or climate outside. Use them to set a room apart from the rest of a hotel, restaurant or bar by defining a room’s specific and unique character.

 

Interior Tree Designs

Light bright interior tree design

A light and fresh appeal in contrast to the dark and moody bar area.

Large stone planters on plinths add even greater height to these trees in the Ugly Duckling, Melbourne. The result is a light, bright and fresh feel to the restaurant – a stark comparison to the oak and dark blues of the proceeding bar area (not pictured).

Silver birch interior trees

Ethos uses silver birch trees as a design focal point

Ethos restaurant in London uses silver birch tree trunks to create this amazing interior. The unique bark of the trees echoes the marble table tops. The overall design gives an organic and bountiful-nature aspect that reflects the quality of the produce used on this vegetarian restaurant’s menu. 

Interior trees and decorations

A joyous combination of tree leaves and paper-chain ceiling decorations.

There are several interior trees in play at the Weranda Lunch & Wine restaurant in Pozna, Poland. Combine them with many plants, planters and table flowers plus the extraordinary paper-chain ceiling decorations and the result is magical.

 

Multiple plants and interior trees

Rich and warm interior of the Dishroom in Shoreditch

Whilst there are no actual trees in the Dishroom in Shoreditch, London, the lush ferns on tall plant stands are doing a grand job. The restaurant uses an eclectic mix of the dark-toned wooden furniture, leafy plants, and beige upholstery. Add the ropes-covered pillars, brick and bare plaster walls and the overall effect is kind of hipster-colonialism.

Interior Trees at night

Central interior tree design

Seating around the trunk allows you to site under the canopy.

The wonderfully-named Woolloomooloo Wharf hotel in Sydney has seating area constructed around one of its focal trees (plus compulsory kitsch pink flamingoes). The canopy has fairy lights decorating the branches making it a delightful space to sit and sip.

Interior trees with lights

1920s glamour at the refurbished Refuge in Manchester.

The Refuge, Manchester glamourous refurbishment includes a Winter Garden. Combining classy black and white tiles with a palette of soft greens, it has a decadent yet relaxed feel evocative of the 1920s. A great tip when adding an impressive interior tree is to also add lighting. The room can be transformed once more at night when the lighting is switched on.

Interior tree with lights

Who would have thought Disneyland could be classy?

The Starbucks at Disneyland demonstrates the lighted tree at night. Surprisingly stylish given its theme park location, a bench seat encircles the tree creating seating for multiple tables. Plus the fairy lights are certainly worthy of any Disney princess.

Artifical Tall Trees at Floresy

Floresy offers a bespoke design service for larger-scale artificial trees. Whether it’s oak, acacia or baobab, each tree is custom-made to the customer’s specifications. Suitable for indoor or outdoor use, our trees are durable, weather-proof and fully protected against UV fading and damage.

Faux Artificial interior tree

Floresy artificial trees are custom built to match your requirements

Each tree can be built to match very specific requirements. They can have an exact height, canopy size or even an unusual shape to frame an architectural feature such as a door or window. And once installed they require no additional maintenance and will look fabulous all year round. Our design team are here to help create you the perfect tree.

To speak to one of our design consultants, please call 0208 0770891 or fill out the contact form on our Artificial Tall Tree page.

 

Luxurious Artificial Plants

Interior Design with Luxurious Artificial Plants

Once upon a time, artificial plants were synonymous with cheap and tasteless style – a total no-go in any stylish home or office. But things have changed. Luxurious artificial plants and flower arrangements are now resident in the chicest of homes and office spaces and are on the wish-list of many a top interior designer. Thanks to the use of advanced materials and design methods, the fake plants of today almost indistinguishable from the real thing. Moreover, in the long run, they are much more economical both in terms of money and time.

Here at Floresy, we provide only the highest quality of luxurious artificial plants. All our products are, quite simply, beautiful, but in today’s post we will pick out some of our favourites from the collection.

We ask what are the different variations of luxury, and how can we create an atmosphere of opulence and abundance using artificial plants?

Jungle Fever

There’s no doubting that plants and flowers transform an interior. But if you keep your eye on design trends, you will notice that plants are everywhere. Interior designers are bringing the outdoors indoors. Luxurious urban homes are beginning to resemble an indoor jungle.

It seems that this urban-jungle theme is here to stay. Large-leaved, exotic plants are found littered all over the pages of interior design magazines. And, as winter approaches, our desire for tropical-style rooms will only get stronger. However, exotic plants require lots of care and sunlight. So for a low-maintenance solution for a busy lifestyle or a less-than-ideal environment, artificial counterparts are the perfect solution.

Zebras and Elephants

One of our all-time favourites is the gorgeous Alocasia Calidora or, as it’s affectionately known, ‘Elephant Ears’. With its luscious and vibrant green leaves, the Alocasia Calidora will liven up your living space no end.

artificial tree alocasia 120 cm

artificial alocasia calidora

Next is our fantastic selection of grasses. For instant height or to give a modern and contemporary feel, grasses are a great solution for your home or office. Our Zebra grasses come in a variety of sizes and are currently on Sale – snap one up now!

Zebra Grass high quality luxurious artificial plants

Artificial Zebra Grass

You needn’t wait until next summer to inject some warmth and colour into your home or office. All our products will provide year-round greenery. So brighten up your interiors regardless of the weather or season – you won’t regret it.

Orchids Orchids Everywhere

Both the Alocasia Calidora and the grasses are perfect for adding greenery to your space. But for additional colour and interest, how about adding flowers too? 

Orchids are rare and delicate plants that have a reputation for being difficult to care for. But this particular nature only adds to their association with beauty, opulence and wealth. Orchids have been admired and desired for centuries. From ancient tribal fertility rituals to the mantelpieces of the Victorian aristocracy, orchids are treasured all over the world.

Our artificial orchids are a firm favourite of our retail and hospitality clients. In restaurants and shops where natural light is scarce, our orchids are the perfect solution.

Below you can see an example of one of our displays of Phalaenopsis orchids (also known as moth orchids). These flowers are truly divine, and better yet, they are a perfect imitation of the real thing – it will take rather a lot of exploration before anyone can tell that they are actually luxorious artificial plants.

 

Luxurious artificial orchids

Luxurious artificial orchids are just like the real thing.

Artificial orchid arrangements in metal planters

Artificial orchid arrangements in metal planters

If it’s luxury with a hint of mystery that you’re after, it’s got to be orchids. You can find our Phalaenopsis orchids and other varieties over in our shop.

Bouquets Galore

Recently we’ve been working to create some bespoke flower bouquets for office buildings in London. First impressions count so creating a welcoming reception for any business is vital. However, keeping a constant supply of fresh flowers is a costly overhead. Worse still, a flower display that is past its best will have a detrimental effect on the impression you are trying to give. This is where Floresy comes in.

Our arrangements are the closest thing to real flowers that you can find. Your customers will be none the wiser. We can help you retain that luxurious feel at a fraction of the cost.

Exclusive Bespoke Service

In addition to our ready-made flower arrangements in our collection, we make most of our bouquets to order. This means that you can choose your favourite flowers and colours, and the shape of your arrangements. We can even work from a photograph to reproduce a live bouquet with artificial flowers. During production, we give our clients regular updates including photos of the products before they leave our workshop. This is so we ensure that your satisfaction will be guaranteed.

If you’re interested in our bespoke flower arranging service, give us a call today to discuss your requirements.

Luxurious Artificial Plants and Luxurious Services

Everyone has their own ideas about what luxury means to them. Here at Floresy all of our plants and flowers, regardless of their style, are luxurious. And on top of our products, our bespoke services are second to none. We go the extra mile to make sure you have exactly what you desire. So if floral dreams go beyond the scope of our catalogue, get in touch, because we can make them come true!

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