Interior Design

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Why do our brains like high ceilings?

High ceilings are a highly desirable architectural feature. But why? And what’s so bad about normal ceiling heights?

We like high ceilings because of their association with grand interiors or properties from certain periods, such as houses from the Georgian era. Walking into a hotel lobby with lofty ceilings will add anticipation of just how luxury your guest experience will be. And a cathedral’s vaulted ceiling will raise your eyes, and thoughts, to heaven.

But likewise, high ceilings can make a room feel cold or empty. The room may lack warmth or make you feel uncomfortable and exposed. A large foyer in an office building can feel intimidating or clinical. Or maybe the room just lacks the appropriate proportions to warrant a high ceiling and therefore feels ‘wrong’.

There have been several studies that have looked at our relationship with ceilings height. One suggests that we find high ceilings more beautiful because we associate them with freedom. Whereas lower ceilings seem to stimulate better decision making perhaps in response to feeling confined and in need of an exit strategy.

This is all because of a concept called ‘priming‘ which activates different thought-processing in the brain. In other words, ceiling height can change how we think.

The upshot of this information is that both high ceilings and ceilings of a normal height can be beneficial to a workplace or retailer, depending on how you want to workers or customers to behave.

Use ceiling height to create different working environments or to influence how we want our customers to behave.

Hotels may want to promote a sense of freedom and escapism for their customers, with high ceilings inspiring the possibilities of their stay. Retailers may also want their customers to feel inspired but would a more typical ceiling height encourage decision making and lead to a purchase better?

An ideal office environment would offer different spaces for when a worker needs to be creative and expansive in their thinking, perhaps problem-solving with colleagues. But when that report’s deadline is looming, getting your head down in a lower-ceiling environment could help improve focus.

How to make your ceiling look higher

  • Draw the eye to the highest point by hanging curtains/blinds at the top of the wall, not just the top of the window.
  • Choose furniture with a low profile. Avoid high back sofas and chairs. Low-profile will create a greater expanse of space between the top of the furniture and the ceiling. Conversely, you can include high profile pieces such as a tall shelving unit. This contrast of height with your low profile seating will also create a similar sense of expansive space.
  • Paint your ceiling the same colour as the walls. Lighter colours work better but so do gloss paints as they will reflect the light making the ceiling feel higher.
  • Avoid clutter and overfilling a room as this detracts from the sense of space.

How to make your ceiling look lower

  • Use darker colours on the ceiling. If you combine this with a picture rail at you desired ceiling height, paint the walls the same colour as the ceiling down to this rail.
  • Hang suspended lighting at lower heights to bring the focus down from the ceiling height. You can use this same trick with hanging/trailing plants.
  • Bigger furniture will fill a room with a high ceiling and give a better sense of scale.

Plants are a great way to emphasise an area that you want to draw focus to. You can use tall plants to raise the eye-line or to create contrast with low-profile furniture. Wall-mounted displays can also define the height of a room and hanging plants can be used to create a floating ceiling at whatever height you wish. Floor-standing pots with bushy foliage are a great way to keep the focus lower.

Floresy offers exciting solutions to your interior needs. Get in touch today.

 

 

What is Interior Landscaping?

Interior landscaping is an expression in use by many interior designers who work exclusively with indoor planting schemes to describe what they do. You’ve probably heard of landscaping – the physical process of reshaping the land. Hard landscaping refers to structures such as walls, pergolas, patios and even follies. Soft landscaping is the term for the planting within the landscaped garden.

So, interior landscaping is a bit of an oxymoron. Afterall, there isn’t any land to be ‘scaped! Instead, it is the process of adding plants and greenery to work with the angles, dimensions and light inside buildings and internal structures. Perhaps ‘plantscaping‘ or ‘interiorscaping‘ are more accurate terms. All three of these expressions are rather interchangeable with businesses and designers using them to describe their own unique services.

Despite sounding trendy, the term has been in popular use within the industry for a considerable amount of time. The terms emerged in the 1970s following the publication of Richard Gain’s book ‘Interior Plantscaping‘. Some people choose to use the term exclusively for interior spaces will others use them to describe gardens within buildings.

Interior landscaping is the design and possible implementation of a planting scheme that compliments an interior space. It isn’t the maintenance of those plants although some companies will offer both these services. It also is less about a potted plant of your desk but more about structural planting that works directly with architectural details of a building. 

Examples of Interior Landscaping

Done properly, you probably won’t notice that an interior has been ‘plantscaped‘. We expect interiors in hotels, shopping centres or business foyers to have a certain look and feel.

A popular interior feature is the Green Wall or Living Walls. Usually imposing and certainly spectacular, green walls are plants grown vertically such as this example from Biotecture for Centrica’s office in Windsor.

Interior landscaping of a green wall

Interior landscaping includes impressive installations like his green wall

For large interior spaces – those with considerable ceiling height – using tall indoor plants, such as trees can be just as spectacular. Trees are ultimately architectural plants due to their size. And trees indoors certainly have the wow-factor.

Interior trees can be difficult to maintain due to how very, very thirsty they can be. Some have extensive roots systems that extend out from the trunk for almost as far as the tree is tall. So the solution is to use certain species that could be grown in containers. Or, the alternative solution to this problem is to use tall artificial plants and artificial trees indoors.

Faux Artificial interior tree

Bespoke artificial trees match your individual requirements

How does Interior Landscaping benefit me?

Interior landscaping offers the same benefits as any interior styling. Without a planting scheme, a room or building may seem off or cold and clinical. But, hey, if cold and clinical is your brand – go with that. Interiorscaping is more obvious when it is missing. Here are some of the benefits of interior landscaping:

Brand

Help define who you are and what you do from the moment someone walks into your shop or lobby. Plants and their containers can add humour, elegance or even a tropical vibe.

Ambience

The atmosphere is important in any setting. A structured, neat and uniform planting scheme will add a professional and serious note to an office or lobby. Softer planting can help people feel more relaxed and less anxious which is a great thing in a dentists waiting room.

Function

Plants can help define a room’s function: Lines of container plants will define doorways or walkways. Add discretion and privacy to areas for seating and talking by using the plants as screens or room dividers.

Wellness

Many studies conclude how important connection to nature is. It has a direct impact on the overall wellness and happiness of people working in any environment. Plants help add the greenery needed for that connection. The wellness experienced by workers leads to increases in productivity and fewer sick days.

Noice reduction

Big open spaces are echoey. You can help improve the acoustics of large spaces by adding a planting to dampen the sounds. This is great for open-plan offices and hotel lobbies. But also for busy restaurants. Less so for libraries.

Interested in learning more? Check out these posts on the benefits of artificial plants in commercial spaces and biophilic design.

Floresy has an interior landscaping offering as part of our bespoke services. By working closely with you, we will use our knowledge and experience to design a scheme that works for and for your space. Contact us today for more information on how we can help.

 

 

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Benefits of Artificial plants in commercial spaces

Benefits of Artificial Plants in commercial interiors

For some, the concept of artificial or faux plants in their interiors seems counter-intuitive. Others may think of them as cheap or obviously fake. Apart from the high-quality and near-identical appearance of modern artificial plants to real plants, there are many benefits of artificial plants as well.

In addition to these benefits, plant maintenance can be a significant overhead for many hospitality businesses – especially those who opt for botanically themed interiors. Water accounts for 10% of utility bills for most hotels and that’s without the labour costs associated with plant maintenance.

Low Maintenance

Artificial plants are very nearly zero-maintenance. They do not require pruning, watering, feeding or pesticides. In fact, all you need to do is occasionally dust you artificial plants. But you need to dust natural plants too, especially big-leaved varieties.

There are no dead flowers or leaves to remove or sweep up and neither is there any soil to be spilt. Plus there is no risk of any water accidentally causing a slip hazard.

  • Low maintenance means you can reduce your overheads.

Suitable for any location

Artificial plants will tolerate any condition. Low light levels that would otherwise see off natural plants like fig trees and palms pose no issue to an artificial or faux plant.

ficus liana exotica tree

Artificial Ficus liana exotica tree from Floresy will not droop or lose its leaves.

Indoors real plants also need to be able to tolerate central heating and air conditioning which can quickly dry them out. You can place an artificial plant next to a radiator and be reassured that it will not wilt.

The benefits of artificial plants also include being able to place them in relatively inaccessible places. Such as suspending them from a ceiling or even just on a particularly high shelf. Because you do not need to water them, you can place an artificial plant where they are out of reach without making maintaining them problematic.

  • Suitability means you do not have to compromise on achieving the desired ambience for your customers.

Storable

Don’t need that artificial plant at the moment? Pop it in the cupboard until you do. Unlike their natural counterparts, you can put an artificial plant into storage until when it is needed next. Just like a Christmas tree.

This is a great benefit for venues who host events or weddings and need to be able to conveniently change layout and decor of a room for each booking.

  • Storable means the artificial plant is an asset that can be reused again and again.

Condition

Artifical plants will not shed their leaves. Their flowers will not fade. When you purchase an artificial plant from Floresy it will stay looking exactly the same all year round. It will not outgrow it’s pot not need pruning to maintain its shape.

  • Condition means that you will not have to reinvest in your plant solutions.

Flexibility

It’s much easier to move artificial plants than real ones. Artificial plants are more robust than real plants. They are also generally lighter in weight due to the planter or pot not containing soil. This portability is another one of the benefits of artificial plants.

  • Flexibility means you can more readily adapt your interiors to suit your needs.

Non-Allergenic

Whilst there are many benefits from having real plants in your spaces, it’s important to remember real plant negatives too. Some plants are triggers for allergy sufferers. Sometimes the plants themselves or the pollen their produce is the irritant. But for some people, it is the use of chemicals in the maintenance of real plants that cause the reaction.

Artificial plants are hypoallergenic. You can also sanitise them using cleanings products that you could do use on an organic plant. Because they do not require maintenance, there is no need for pesticides or insecticides either.

  • Non-allergenic means happier customers and happier employees.
artificial flower arrangements work

One of the benefits of artificial plants means no allergic reactions to flowers or pollen.

Artificial plants offer real solutions for businesses. This is either in the form of lowering their overheads or in the flexibility of using faux plants. You use them on their own to create permanent displays. Or combine them with real plants to achieve the right balance between cost, benefits and style. For more information on how artificial plants can help with your business’s interiors, please give Floresy a call on 0208 0770891

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4 (and a half) Plants with Big Leaves

As we increasingly bring nature into our interiors, foliage is set to be an ongoing trend. So plants with big leaves are popular as they add a big dollop of green in one dose. Plants with big leaves can be clustered with other plants for a tropical or sumptuous feel. However, they can also stand alone and still have an impact. Big leaves are often unfussy and simple therefore give the plant a clean and uncluttered look. This means they suit many modern interiors especially those tending towards minimalism.

There are many choices of indoor plants with big leaves, ranging from trees to the humble houseplant. Here is our guide to some popular options for your interiors.

1. Plants with Big Leaves – Ficus

Fig trees or Ficus come in a wide variety of leaf and trunk variations. They are relatively easy to care for which makes them a popular indoor tree (although they are also known for losing their leaves). The beauty of using a tree over a bushier plant is the floor space remains more open and keeps the room feeling less cluttered.

Big Leaf Ficus in hallway

A pair of big-leaved Ficus in the hallway. Design by Sarah Baynes.

A popular choice from Floresy is this big-leaved ficus with green/white variegated leaves.

Premium Big White-Green Leaves Ficus

Premium Big White-Green Leaves Ficus

2. Anthurium

At first glance, the wet-looking, flesh-red of the anthurium flower suggests this plant could be a carnivore. It isn’t. It’s just a very distinctive houseplant with super-shiny leaves and a long-lasting ‘flowers’. The red part is actually a modified leaf or ‘bract’. It’s the yellow/white spike that contains spirals of tiny, densely-packed flowers.

Anthuriums are native to the Americas and so they have a vibrant, tropical feel. They are a great choice if you want plants with big leaves on a smaller surface such as desk or shelf. They come in a variety of colours ranging from white through a variety of pinks. But the most common is the blood red.

Anthurium with it's distinctive red flowers.

Anthurium with it’s distinctive red flowers.

Whilst the natural form of Anthuriums have fantastic air-purifying abilities, they are also poisonous. To avoid this toxic issue, you could consider an artificial anthurium such as this one from Floresy.

Red Anthurium in Pot

Anthurium by Floresy has large, tactile waxy leaves.

3. Alocasia Calidora

Nothing says “Hello, I’m a plant with big leaves” like an Alocasia. One of the bigger-leafed varieties is nickname ‘elephant ears’ for obvious reasons. These impressive plants need a bright position to thrive indoors so are best suited to sunny rooms and conservatories. Rooms with skylights are also suitable due to the increased light available.

Alocasia plants with big leaves interiors

Something witty or observational about Alocasia Calidora

Alocasia varieties include those with variegated leaves such as this artificial option from Floresy: 

alocasia plants with big leaves foliage display

Big, but not that big…

Alocasias are a fantastic choice for any interior. Available in a range of sizes, they are effectively design-neutral and so will fit into any decor. This classic, mid-green, wide-leafed artificial Alocasia by Floresy will bring fresh foliage to any room.

alocasia calidora plants with big leaves indoor foliage artificial plants

Artificial Alocasia Calidora in various sizes

4. Peace lily

The peace lily or spathiphyllum is an elegant and attractive plant that is a perfect choice for a desk or sunny windowsill. Being a smaller plant than some of the others on this list, it’s leaves aren’t as big. But their shape and texture are certainly evocative of the Alocasia. Like the Anthurium, they have a modified leaf that enhances the size of the delicate white flowers.

Peace Lily Indoor Plants with big leaves

Sergeant Angel’s favourite plant

artificial Spathiphyllum peace lily for interiors

Artificial peace lily by Floresy. Small, but with leaves that punch above their weight.

4.5. Rubber Tree Plant

Here’s the half:

The rubber tree is a really only a variety of the Ficus that features above. The clue is in its Latin name: Ficus Elastica. It is known for it’s large, dark green leaves and is a design icon of 1970’s interiors. Despite its groovy heritage, it has actually featured in our interiors since the Victorian era.

Rubber Tree Plants with big leaves

The rubber tree is at home in 1970’s interiors as it is any contemporary setting.

The rubber tree plant looks great in the sunny rooms with rattan furniture, as shown above in this image from Guiade Jardineria. Equally, this big-leaf plant will suit a dark and moody Victorian gentleman’s study (so great if you’re into Steampunk). If your setting does suffer from low natural light-levels, however, an artificial rubber tree from Floresy is a good solution.

Artificial rubber tree plant with big leaves by Floresy.

Artificial rubber tree plant with big leaves by Floresy.

Floresy stock a wide range of plants with big leaves plus some plants with more delicate leaves too. Visit our shop to view our extensive range.

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6 Hotel room design mistakes to avoid

A hotel room has to work hard. It has to offer good looks, comfort, practicality and a home-from-home for your guests. Whilst at the same time be cost-effective to maintain in order to earn its keep. But when it comes to striking a balance between form and function, there are common design mistakes that any hotel room can fall foul of.

1. Bad lighting

Few of us still sleep with the lights on but bad lighting can seriously cast a shadow on your guest experience. Rooms benefit from multiple light sources that allow guests to change the overall brightness to meet their own preferences. And controlling the lighting needs to be at your guest’s convenience too. Make sure the bedside lamps aren’t too bright and that the controls can be easily reached from the bed. And completely ditch any fluorescent lights – they were ever not a design mistake?

Hotel room with only one bedside table and light

Only one bedside table and light – but what about the guest sleeping on the left?

2. Bold colours that are not restful

It’s great to be able to make a design statement in a room, especially using colours that are on trend. But overuse of bright, powerful colours will not help your guests get a restful night’s sleep. If your chosen theme colour is bright or bold, use it sparingly. Consider using it in throw cushions, lampshade and in wall art. Also, you could choose a patterned curtain fabric that includes the colour in smaller amounts.

Red hotel bedroom accent

Ham Yard Hotel in London uses a very stimulating red but as an accent colour.

3. Oversized furniture or too much furniture

We’ve all been there. Bought that amazing super-king bed that we saw in the store and now you can’t open your wardrobe doors. Even generously sized rooms will feel cramped if they are full of furniture. Floor space is key. For smaller bedrooms, consider a smaller double bed. Alternatively, make each item of furniture earn its keep by having more than one function. For example, a bedside that is also a desk or a dressing table that is also a TV stand. If something can be wall-mounted do so, it frees up the floor giving a greater sense of space.

Clear surfaces and floor area creates space

So many great space-saving ideas such as the long wall shelf keep floor space and surface’s clear. Image from domino.com

4. Lack of technology

You’ve installed free wifi throughout your hotel and you’re patting yourself on the back. If technology was a guest room – you’ve just added the bed. Today’s travellers – especially millennials – expect more than access to wifi which is now considered a necessity. A common hotel room design mistake is insufficient charging sockets as multiple devices may need to be plugged-in simultaneously. With the number of connectable devices growing from two billion in 2006 to a predicted 200 billion by 2020, hotels cannot afford to not invest in greater room technology. Hotel apps that allow personalisation of temperature, lighting and interaction with other hotel’s facilities are fast becoming must-have hotel tech. The Marriott City Centre hotel knows how to do it.

Hotel room design mistakes with technology don't happen at Marriott

Marriott City Centre hotel in Charlotte, USA is an industry-leader for hotel tech. Rooms include Bluetooth connectivity for TV plus room key apps.

5. Clutter

When a guest comes to stay with you, they need to feel welcomed and accommodated. Part of that comes from having somewhere to put their belongings. Clear surfaces are more inviting and tell the guest that room is theirs to use. It might only be a phone and a toothbrush. But if the room is full of brochures, tea & coffee making facilities, lamps and potted plants, the result is a feeling of being unwanted. And that’s a big design mistake.

Radisson Blu Hotel Room

No design mistakes at the Radisson Blu in Schipol: subdued colour scheme with a bold accent, multiple light sources and all those clear surfaces… Design & images property of Creneau International

6. Looks over comfort

Achieving the wow-factor with hotel room design is what we want. It creates a memorable stay for your guests and really enhances their customer experience. However, if that fabulous-looking armchair is so low to the ground that it’s uncomfortable to sit on, what is it for? The fifteen throw cushions on the bed look sumptuous and inviting. But how practical is it for your guests to have to shove them off the bed to lie down. Not to mention the laundry bill! The panel curtains are in an exquisite print but don’t completely cover the window. The wow-factor will lose its value if the bedroom simply does not perform to the same expectation as the looks suggest. These are over-design mistakes. A trend rising alongside the millennial market is for simpler room design. Comfort without fuss.

Simple hotel room design

At the end of the day, it’s all about the bed.

Let Floresy contribute to your good hotel room design with our floral design service.

Biophilic Design – what is it?

Biophilic design is a concept that strives to incorporate nature into our homes, workplaces and community spaces. It embraces the connection between humans and nature by creating a harmonious space that is fulfilling yet still functional and efficient.

The awareness of biophilic design in the workplace is increasing. It comes as we acknowledge how prevalent mental health disorders and cardiovascular disease are in our western societies. The World Health Organisation predicts that these stress-related conditions will be the two biggest health problems by 2020.

The traditional designs of offices and other workplaces focus more on how cost-effective the floor space can be instead of how well people can exist in the space. Furthermore, the increase in technology-dependence and ‘screen-time’ and we lose our connection with nature for significant proportions of our lives.

Biophilic design puts the human experience and well-being at the centre of any design. It is based on the observed concept of biophilia.

What is biophilia?

Biophilia was first noted by psychoanalyst Erich Fromm in his 1973 book The Anatomy of Human Destructiveness. He described it as “the passionate love of life and of all that is alive”. The term was then popularised in the 1980s by the psychologist, Edward O Wilson, in his book, Biophilia (1984). Wilson proposed that humans innate desire to connect with nature is, in part, genetic. He observed how we were becoming disconnected from the natural world because of increases in urbanisation.

Examples of Biophilic Design

Perhaps the most famous examples of biophilic design are the creative playgrounds that global corporations like Google call ‘offices’. However, biophilic design is not limited to billion-dollar industries. Proponents of biophilic design include designers such as Oliver Heath who’s projects have included a garden school in Hackney, London.

biophilic design in an office

Google’s office in Dublin shows examples of biophilic design in the workplace.

biophilc design healthcare hospital

Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne has a large-scale aquarium in its atrium. Photograph: John Gollings

What is the WELL Building Standard?

The International WELL Building Institute (IWBI) is a leader in the global wellness movement that focuses on the ‘design, operations and behaviours’ of buildings. The standard is a holistic approach to well-being and is based on seven core concepts:

  • Air – promote clean air and reduce in sources of indoor air pollution
  • Water – provide safe and clean water for various uses
  • Nourishment – encourage better eating habits and food culture
  • Light – protect the body’s circadian system and support good sleep quality
  • Fitness – integrate physical activity into everyday life and reduce sedentary behaviours
  • Comfort – distraction-free, productive and comfortable indoor environments
  • Mind – optimise cognitive and emotional health through design and technology

Any building can apply for the WELL certification. It is a fantastic tool, especially when used to improve the well-being of the building’s occupants.

What is Sick Building Syndrome (SBS)?

Sick building syndrome is a recognised medical condition relating to poor air quality in workplaces such as offices. The symptoms include headaches, dizziness and nausea as well as irration to the eyes, nose and throat. The majority of cases are considered to be linked to flaws in a building’s air conditioning, heating and ventilation. Contamination including microbial and chemical are also factors.

Because of these factors, addressing the main causes of SBS is likely to involve a serious overall of a building’s infrastructure. However, opening windows and giving the building a good clean are the first steps in addressing problems. The introduction of plants into the building will also help with poor air quality.

What can biophilic design do for you?

There are many studies that show that biophilic design can have a positive impact. Commercial, civic and residential buildings in addition to public spaces can benefit:

  • Biophilic workplaces show increases in worker well-being of up to 13% and in productivity of up to 8%.
  • Healthcare spaces see post-operative recovery rates reduce by 8.5% and a 22% reduction in the need for pain medication.
  • Customers are willing to pay up to 12% more for goods or services when a retail unit is situated in an area with vegetation and landscaping.
  • Urban spaces with greater access to nature have less crime by around 8%.
  • Guests staying in hotel rooms with views of nature including greenery or water are willing to pay 23% more than for rooms that don’t.
  • Concentration levels, rates of attendance and test results all increase in educational spaces with biophilic elements. The negative impacts of ADHD decrease.

In a 100% organic nutshell, biophilic design can have a positive impact in so many areas of our lives. Studies have shown that the simple act of adding plants to an office can have a positive measurable effect. The mental well-being of workers improves through reductions in stress, depression and anxiety.

Floresy design services are here to help you provide the right biophilic solution for your building. The addition of the colour green will create more relaxing and calm spaces for your workers.  Plants and greenery will help improve the customer experience for your guests and clients. Contact us here so we can get started today.

Aneto Case Study: Collaboration with Ink Inch

It is always a pleasure to work with Ink Inch Design Studios. Our latest collaboration with Ink Inch was on refurbishing new premises for cafe venture, Aneto.

Aneto is a cafe, restaurant, and bar located in East Dulwich, London. Its Italian-inspired, health-conscious menu includes a good variety of vegetarian and vegan dishes as well as organic wines and beers. They serve “Breakfast & Brunch, Coffee & Cocktails, Dinner & Drinks”. The premises on the East Dulwich Road was in need of a complete renovation before Aneto could open. A total overhaul of the 150 square meters old pub was required to turn it into a fresh and inviting cafe. The project began in November 2017 and completed in February 2018.

A Kitchen Garden

From the beginning, Ink Inch and Aneto owner, Damiano, knew ‘green’ was going to be an important theme. “We wanted to give a garden vibe to the place, with a lot of green almost everywhere,” says Francesca, designer at Ink Inch. “We already knew the quality of the Floresy plants so we thought that would be a good fit for us.”

Floresy was brought on board as both supplier and plant consultant.

The result is a balmy outdoor feel. The fresh greens in a bright space set against the natural brick walls. Just like being in a sunny kitchen courtyard garden.

The wall panels have been painted white with individual planks of blue in an effective but budget-friendly scheme. The blues repeat in the furniture, most of which has been repainted and restored.

Small plants, simple shelving and bare brick walls.

Fresh Blues

White and tones of blue keep the decor fresh and bright. The painted-white wall panelling has highlights of individual planks in varying shades of blue. This is an effective but budget-friendly scheme. The blues repeat in the repainted and restored furniture. The natural wood elements and punches of green give a grounded and natural vibe to the design. Simple and wholesome. The floor space is maximised by keeping the area uncluttered. The decoration is minimal, capitalising on the wall space to add interest and personality.

Blue highlights on bar area of a cafe

Highlights individual planks with differing shades of blue

Eatery Greenery

The bespoke wooden shelving that surrounds the kitchen doors creates a valuable space. The jars filled with ingredients plus Floresy herbs, grasses, and succulents in small pots suggest the cafe’s identity almost as much as the menu. The result is a larder like display that introduces the kitchen area. Fresh and honest ingredients therefore healthy and authentic food. In addition, the variety of plants and of their containers adds texture. It is informal and functional as well as being decorative.

Bespoke wooden shelving door surround kitchen larder

Shelving unit gives identity. This is an eatery with fresh and quality produce.

Ingredients succulents herbs in jars and pots on wooden shelf in cafe

Ingredients and Floresy plants in simple pots. This is an honest and authentic restaurant.

The recessed shelf along the back wall adds height to the room. The up-lit plants invite you deeper into the cafe, past the bar and into the main seating area. Especially as the numerous grasses in small pots are sitting against the brick wall. Are they playing with the perspective and depth of the room?

Commercial coffee shop design artificial plants, collaboration with Ink Inch Design on Aneto Deli

Recessed and uplight shelf unit along the back wall contains Floresy’s

Ready for business

In conclusion, Aneto is a vibrant and inviting space. Its ambience is that of a bustling kitchen and steaming coffee machines. How easy it is to imagine the buzz of family and friends enjoying each other’s company.

Ink Inch is a London-based team of interior and graphic designers. Combing both disciplines creates unity of visual elements. They adopt a simple and holistic approach to their work. All projects are met with “passion, love, and positivity“. We look forward to our next collaboration with Ink Inch.

You can find out more about our artificial flower design services here. Or you can instead read our dedicated sub-page about artificial plants for restaurants.

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How to use plants as room dividers

Plants are a must-have accessory for any interior but their use need not be purely decorative. Large open plan spaces such as lobbies, offices and restaurants often need to define areas or zones. This may be waiting areas, eating areas or different teams in an office. Using plants as room dividers allow spaces to be kept light and open whilst still defining the boundary.

1. Pot Plants on Free Standing Shelves

Free standing shelves pot plants

insideout.com.au plants on free-standing shelves as room dividers

insideout.com.au use multiple smaller plants on a free-standing shelf unit to create this effective room divider. The combination of the boxy lines of the shelves with the lush and leafy plants creates a definite but soft divide that maximises the greenery on display.

Light can still travel through the shelves and the space remains open and welcoming. Tantalising glimpses of what is on the other side can be had through the gaps in the leaves. Yet the physicality of the shelves keeps the zones separate.

This principle works well in an office or a restaurant area where space needs to be distinct but still remain communal and social.

free-standing shelves with potted plants creates an airy room divide

Conclusion Office by DZAP free-standing shelves with potted plants creates an airy room divider

DZAP, Heerlen fluently demonstrates the same principle in this project for Conclusion Office (as featured on retaildesignblog.net). Here, the ratio of plant to shelf space is smaller granting an even greater sense of transparency. The seating area is defined but open and remains connected to the rest of the interior.

It’s a very versatile look: swap or combine the plants with ceramics or books to change the look from leafy and fresh to thoughtful and contemplative. This style, evocative of art galleries and libraries, would also suit an urban coffee house.

Get the look:

Combine open, free-standing shelving units with Floresy’s ferns in galvanised pots. Or if capitalising on the mystery beyond the barrier interests you, why not try these herbs in glass pots that allow even more light to pass through. 


2. Low divides for seated areas

Room dividers need not be high level. In an office, where everyone is typically seated, the divide can be kept lower. This maximises the sense of space and makes for easier quick conversations over the dividers promoting communication and collaboration among workers.

This also works well for waiting areas and lobbies. Clients are able to sit and relax whilst striking the right balance between feeling suitably private but not hidden (and likely to be forgotten or missed).

This display from idealhome.co.uk uses the same principle in a living space. But the same set-up would look at home in a trendy office environment (maybe even the shoes). Plus the use of cupboards also offers much-needed storage space adding practicality to ornamentation.

Low room divider with large leaf plants

Low room divider with large leaf plants also provides storage

In this Miami hotel lounge, designed by Meyer Davis, the use of plant room dividers in the seating area is subtle but effective. Sitting on the pristine white sofas, the delicate fronds of the ferns are just high enough to give privacy. But also low enough so as to not distract from the height of the featured, painted banyan tree trunks.

 

Meyer Davis designed hotel lounge

Hotel lounge uses low planting to offer seated privacy.

Get the look:

Floresy offers many choices of plants and trees that would look great as a low-level room divider. The bushy nature of these Schefflera plants is perfect for creating screens.

Choose a low-level container to place on the ground or a trough-style planter if positioning on top of low storage furniture.

Or why not go retro with these floor standing small bamboo trees? At 120cm and in an attractive pot they are tall enough to provide a screen when seated.

 


3. Use trees to create impact and atmosphere

Often the use of trees indoors is to create a central or focal point to a lobby or other large space. But here, the small and medium-sized trees create a seating zone, offer privacy and form an attractive feature. Clusters of palms of varying height and variety create a lavish and tropical screen in this hotel lobby at the EDITION hotel, Miami. The elegant white planters reflect the white marble floors and light coloured upholstery.

Trees in hotel lobby

Miami Beach Edition lobby creates impact and atmosphere using trees.

Broad-leafed trees at Sony Music Entertainment’s Amsterdam HQ create a secluded spot in the corner of their office. The palette of greens and soft turquoises in the furnishings and planters blend to create a peaceful sea-green oasis.

The room dividers here are less of a physical barrier and offer more of a screen. So move through the trees and enter the seclusion under the canopy of exotic leaves.

Broad leafed trees and plants offer seclusion in an open plan office

Broad-leafed trees and plants offer seclusion in an open plan office

 

Get the look:

This deluxe Kentia palm tree at 225cm adds an instant tropical yet relaxed feel to an interior. Also available in smaller sizes. The palm combines beautifully with the big, waxy leaves of the Alocasia Calidora. The generous leaf size lends itself to creating privacy. Finish the look with a selection of stylish containers from Floresy’s range of planters and pots.

Luxurious Artificial Plants

Interior Design with Luxurious Artificial Plants

Once upon a time, artificial plants were synonymous with cheap and tasteless style – a total no-go in any stylish home or office. But things have changed. Luxurious artificial plants and flower arrangements are now resident in the chicest of homes and office spaces and are on the wish-list of many a top interior designer. Thanks to the use of advanced materials and design methods, the fake plants of today almost indistinguishable from the real thing. Moreover, in the long run, they are much more economical both in terms of money and time.

Here at Floresy, we provide only the highest quality of luxurious artificial plants. All our products are, quite simply, beautiful, but in today’s post we will pick out some of our favourites from the collection.

We ask what are the different variations of luxury, and how can we create an atmosphere of opulence and abundance using artificial plants?

Jungle Fever

There’s no doubting that plants and flowers transform an interior. But if you keep your eye on design trends, you will notice that plants are everywhere. Interior designers are bringing the outdoors indoors. Luxurious urban homes are beginning to resemble an indoor jungle.

It seems that this urban-jungle theme is here to stay. Large-leaved, exotic plants are found littered all over the pages of interior design magazines. And, as winter approaches, our desire for tropical-style rooms will only get stronger. However, exotic plants require lots of care and sunlight. So for a low-maintenance solution for a busy lifestyle or a less-than-ideal environment, artificial counterparts are the perfect solution.

Zebras and Elephants

One of our all-time favourites is the gorgeous Alocasia Calidora or, as it’s affectionately known, ‘Elephant Ears’. With its luscious and vibrant green leaves, the Alocasia Calidora will liven up your living space no end.

artificial tree alocasia 120 cm

artificial alocasia calidora

Next is our fantastic selection of grasses. For instant height or to give a modern and contemporary feel, grasses are a great solution for your home or office. Our Zebra grasses come in a variety of sizes and are currently on Sale – snap one up now!

Zebra Grass high quality luxurious artificial plants

Artificial Zebra Grass

You needn’t wait until next summer to inject some warmth and colour into your home or office. All our products will provide year-round greenery. So brighten up your interiors regardless of the weather or season – you won’t regret it.

Orchids Orchids Everywhere

Both the Alocasia Calidora and the grasses are perfect for adding greenery to your space. But for additional colour and interest, how about adding flowers too? 

Orchids are rare and delicate plants that have a reputation for being difficult to care for. But this particular nature only adds to their association with beauty, opulence and wealth. Orchids have been admired and desired for centuries. From ancient tribal fertility rituals to the mantelpieces of the Victorian aristocracy, orchids are treasured all over the world.

Our artificial orchids are a firm favourite of our retail and hospitality clients. In restaurants and shops where natural light is scarce, our orchids are the perfect solution.

Below you can see an example of one of our displays of Phalaenopsis orchids (also known as moth orchids). These flowers are truly divine, and better yet, they are a perfect imitation of the real thing – it will take rather a lot of exploration before anyone can tell that they are actually luxorious artificial plants.

 

Luxurious artificial orchids

Luxurious artificial orchids are just like the real thing.

Artificial orchid arrangements in metal planters

Artificial orchid arrangements in metal planters

If it’s luxury with a hint of mystery that you’re after, it’s got to be orchids. You can find our Phalaenopsis orchids and other varieties over in our shop.

Bouquets Galore

Recently we’ve been working to create some bespoke flower bouquets for office buildings in London. First impressions count so creating a welcoming reception for any business is vital. However, keeping a constant supply of fresh flowers is a costly overhead. Worse still, a flower display that is past its best will have a detrimental effect on the impression you are trying to give. This is where Floresy comes in.

Our arrangements are the closest thing to real flowers that you can find. Your customers will be none the wiser. We can help you retain that luxurious feel at a fraction of the cost.

Exclusive Bespoke Service

In addition to our ready-made flower arrangements in our collection, we make most of our bouquets to order. This means that you can choose your favourite flowers and colours, and the shape of your arrangements. We can even work from a photograph to reproduce a live bouquet with artificial flowers. During production, we give our clients regular updates including photos of the products before they leave our workshop. This is so we ensure that your satisfaction will be guaranteed.

If you’re interested in our bespoke flower arranging service, give us a call today to discuss your requirements.

Luxurious Artificial Plants and Luxurious Services

Everyone has their own ideas about what luxury means to them. Here at Floresy all of our plants and flowers, regardless of their style, are luxurious. And on top of our products, our bespoke services are second to none. We go the extra mile to make sure you have exactly what you desire. So if floral dreams go beyond the scope of our catalogue, get in touch, because we can make them come true!

Watch more on YouTube Floresy channel

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Artificial Bamboo Tree – Inspiration

Artificial Bamboo Trees at Floresy are versatile, practical and decorative.

Bamboo is a mystical plant deeply rooted in Chinese culture and other countries across Asia. To the Chinese, it represents integrity and means friendship in India. Some folktales from around the world include either a baby or a beautiful woman that emerges from a bamboo stem…

Rare-blooming, bamboo is actually a grass and is one of the fastest growing plants in the world. Some species grow at rates of up to 90cm in a 24 hour period. It is lightweight, strong but flexible and very versatile. It can be used in place of wood as anything from rafts and skateboards through to fishing rods and scaffolding. Modern Western interiors see bamboo used in flooring, furniture and kitchen utensils. Bamboo suggests peace and tranquillity. It is also used to create natural textiles for clothing. And no self-respecting English garden is without Sweet Peas growing up a wigwam of bamboo canes.

So, needless to say, this plant is rather special.

artificial bamboo tree indoor

At Floresy, we offer a wide choice of artificial Bamboo Tree products. Bamboo is consistently one of our most popular selling plants. Just as the natural form lends itself to many uses, our artificial bamboo products are just as versatile. Bamboo works well both indoors and outdoors. One of it’s most versatile qualities from a design point of view is that it is both decorative and architectural. Here are some design ideas to give inspiration of how to use bamboo in your domestic or commercial setting.

Artificial bamboo as a space divider

You can use artificial bamboo to divide specific areas. Subdividing large spaces creates smaller, more usable “rooms” without losing the scale of the space.  For an example, rows of bamboo will create smaller, more discrete spaces. This quickly and cost-effectively solves the demand for more meeting rooms that many open-plan offices can’t deliver. For a large outdoor space – for example, a swimming pool terrace – you can use potted bamboos to separate the pool from the terrace giving bathers greater privacy. Using bamboo like this creates a sense of order and privacy in an otherwise open space. It retains the sense of space and doesn’t adversely affect light conditions. Plus it is exotic yet calming.

artificial bamboo wall screen

Artifical bamboo as a screen

Try using a bamboo screen to disguise or hide something. You can use a line of plants to hide an unsightly or unattractive wall, for example. Likewise, you can use bamboo’s natural beauty to bring interest to an otherwise boring and plain area. Because bamboo is tall, it is useful for screening larger areas. During a refurbishment, artificial bamboo offers a flexible and attractive choice to temporarily screen the work.  Plus, being artificial you can store them when not in use.

Artificial bamboo as a decorative feature

Simple decorations of bamboo are perfect for interiors with a minimalist style. By placing bamboo poles in a modern vase act you can create a frugal and honest display. Or, place the bamboo close to a wall to add some colour and interest. The leaves of bamboo add texture whilst the tall stems bring instant height. You can easily create a gentle atmosphere of harmony with a well-chosen bamboo.

artificial bamboo office reception

 

Our artificial bamboos are perfect for anyone who wants to add more greenery to a room. They are great for areas which are too dark for real plants. Being artificial means they are more flexible in how you choose to use them. Plus, they are portable so can adapt to changes in a rooms purpose, layout or design. And, very unlike a real plant, pop them in the cupboard when not in use. Our artificial bamboo is the best faux bamboo you can find. Available to buy in sizes ranging from 60cm to 300cm in height, Floresy has artificial bamboos to suit every location.

If you would like advice about designing your space with artificial plants or faux tall trees, please contact us here.