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Artificial Christmas product showcase

Christmas 2018 is nearly upon us, again, despite it only being a year since the last one. Let’s look at the artificial Christmas trees and plants that Floresy has to offer:

Poinsettia

Artificial Poinsettia Red White

Artificial Christmas Poinsettia Plants

The Poinsettia is a popular Christmas ‘flower’ prized for its deep green leaves and bright red bracts. The bracts aren’t true flowers but instead leaves that turn red (or orange, pink or white depending on the variety).

The plant is originally from Mexico where it also began its association with Christmas. Legend has it that a young girl too poor to buy a gift for Jesus’s birthday picked plants from the roadside instead. The bright red blossoms sprouted from the weeds when displayed on the Church’s alter and – bingo – Poinsettias were created.

In the US, 12th December is National Poinsettia Day.

Floresy’s artificial poinsettias come in either white or red colours.

 

Advent Crown

Conifers Artificial Advent Wreath

Conifers Advent Wreath Artificial Plant

The Advent Wreath or Advent Crown is a Christian tradition that represents the four weeks of Advent.

A circular wreath made from evergreen plants symbolises the Christian god’s love and eternity. One of the candles is lit on each Sunday of the four weeks of advent. Different Christian sects may use different colours of candles to match the vestments of their priests such as blue, red, violet or rose.

Sometimes, people will add a fifth candle to the advent wreath and light it on Christmas Day.

The advent wreath was made famous on the British children’s TV program, Blue Peter. The presenters made a wreath using wire coat hangers and tinsel.

Floresy’s artificial advent wreath uses conifer branches.

Artificial Christmas Wreath

Artificial Christmas Wreath Arrangement

Christmas Wreath Artificial

People have been using assortments of flowers, leaves, twigs and fruits to form rings for centuries. Wreaths are often used as decoration but people may also wear them on their heads or around their necks.

Politicians of the ancient Greco-roman world would wear laurel wreaths on their heads to represent their rank or occupation, such as a politician. Farming communities would make harvest wreaths from the leftover straw from their grain bounty.

The Christmas wreath is made using evergreen foliage and is decorated with twigs, berries or pine cones associated with winter. It has its roots in Pagan religions but has become a popular decorative addition at Christmas time too.

The artificial Christmas wreath from Floresy includes pine cones and a mixture of evergreen conifer and spruce fronds.

Potted Spruce

artificial spruce Christmas tree

Artificial spruce tree in a pot

It’s the classic Christmas tree we all know and love.

Spruce trees are members of the same family as firs and pine trees. They come from northern temperate regions of the planet. They are evergreen trees that have needles instead of leaves. Conifers, the family of trees that spruces belong to, have been growing on earth since the early Carboniferous period, which is about 300 million years ago.

The oldest living tree is believed to be a Norway spruce that is thought to be 9550 years old!

Spruce trees sometimes grow up to 60m in height. So you’ll be glad to know that Floresy’s artificial spruce trees are available in more manageable 145cm, 160cm and 180cm sizes.

Silver Winter Tree

artificial silver tree with no leaves

Artificial silver tree

If you’re looking for an alternative look for your Christmas display, why not consider this silver artificial tree? Resembling a deciduous tree in deep winter, these trees have no leaves and their bare branches are silver in colour. 

Their shimmer is a perfect addition to a winter wonderland scene but likewise, those barren branches would make for a dramatic festive look.

In the 1950s, silver Christmas trees made from aluminium gained popularity. It’s dramatically artificial look matched the era of innovation, atomic power and the dawning of the space-age. But they came to represent the over-commercialisation of Christmas and had lost their appeal by 1965.

Now, these retro trees are collector’s items and museum exhibits. Despite their bad-taste design, they are cultural icons of the hopeful and positive spirit of the 1950s.

Snow Tree

snow tree xmas

snow tree, green and snow

Floresy’s snow tree is a ready-to-display artificial Christmas tree that comes complete with lights. The thick branches covered with glossy green needles are decorated to simulate the snow-covered fronds of a forest in winter.

The tradition of bringing an evergreen branch indoors for a winter festival goes back for thousands of years. Most pagan or pre-Christian rituals would use branches or fronds of evergreen foliage fashioned into wreaths. Christianity popularised the tree tradition, most likely alongside the already accepted the pagan customs.

Prince Albert introduced the Christmas Tree tradition to the UK during Queen Victoria’s reign. Decorating trees at Christmas time had grown in fashion among the European nobles during the early 19th century. 

Before plastic tinsel and baubles, people would decorate their trees using fruits and paper flowers.

Check out Florey’s complete range of artificial Christmas trees and plants.

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Summer Solstice – Connecting with nature

Throughout human history, we have always recognised the summer solstice. Ancient civilisations the world over have celebrated it as the longest day or shortest shadow of the year. Described as both midsummer and the start of summer it is widely associated with the fertility of the earth and therefore feminine power.

  • In ancient China, the summer solstice would celebrate the feminine yin (while the masculine yang gets his moment at the Winter Solstice).
  • The Sioux people of North America honoured the sun in their rituals at this time of year, including the symbolic connecting earth and heaven by felling and raising a large tree.
  • Across pagan Europe, people would dance and light ritual bonfires to represent the power of the sun at its peak.

Pagan rituals were largely wiped out by Christianity spreading across Europe. However, in some instances, the practices live on in the Christian traditions of that region. For example, in Scandinavia, St John the Baptist is celebrated on 24th June and includes both traditional midsummer celebrations and Christian symbolism.

Connecting with nature

Today, the solstice – or Litha or Epona – is still widely celebrated and fertility remains a dominant theme. We acknowledge feminine power with Mother Nature in full bloom during the summer months. After all, the land is bountiful and the food is plentiful during the year’s most active growing season.

Through movements such as neo-paganism and New Age ways of thinking, the summer solstice is also about reconnecting with nature. The awareness of our impact on the environment, being outdoors, respecting our environment and each other are all key aspects of modern-day midsummer celebrations. Creativity, community and self-expression, through dancing and music, are as integral to our worship today as they have always been.

And, of course, the most notable celebration of the summer solstice is the large gathering of people at Stonehenge, UK.

Flowers of Summer Solstice Celebrations

Some flowers have particular importance for the summer solstice. Here are some of the key blooms:

Flower garlands

Nothing represents summer like flowers! Any flowers are suitable choices for displays that celebrate the summer. They are popular choices for decorating homes, commercial or communal spaces. Plus flowers are a favourite choice for headdresses by revellers celebrating the solstice.

Silk Peony Wreath

Secret Garden – Silk Peony Wreath makes the perfect table centrepiece for a summer-time celebration

Artificial peony table centrepiece

This long garland can easily adorn a reception desk, the head table at a wedding or above a mantlepiece

These beautiful flower garlands from Floresy are perfect for any summer celebration. You can use them to decorate a table as shown in the images but also on a fire surround or mantle, across the front of a shelf or reception desk – you can even fix the garland to the wall.

Oak Tree

Oak is particularly symbolic. Trees are often the focus of worship and oak represents strength and endurance. It also represents a doorway and so, in the context of the solstice, crossing the threshold into the second part of the year where Summer’s abundance gives way to Winter’s frugality.

Floresy offers a bespoke large tree design service. You can have your very own artificial oak tree tailor-made to fit your requirements.

Mistletoe

More often associated with the Winter Solstice, mistletoe is still important to the summer festival because of its strong potency when found on oak trees. Mistletoe has associations with fertility and when cut from an oak tree, represents the powerful oak tree losing its strength as the seasons begin to wane.

Herbs

Early pagan cultures believed that herbs were at their most potent during the summer hence their association with the summer solstice. This sweet collection of potted artificial herbs from Floresy are a great choice to add a touch of nature to any setting. Herbs represent health and fresh, quality food. A great choice for a spa or restaurant.

Small potted herbs

Small potted artificial herbs by Floresy. Herbs represent health, traditional remedies and fresh ingredients.

Floresy has over 150 artificial flowers, trees and plant products ready to decorate your business or home. Being artificial means you can easily store them out of season, ready for the next opportunity for display. What not browse our online shop to find your perfect artificial plant solution?