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How to use plants as room dividers

Plants as room dividers

Plants are a must-have accessory for any interior but their use need not be purely decorative. Large open plan spaces such as lobbies, offices and restaurants often need to define areas or zones. This may be waiting areas, eating areas or different teams in an office. Using plants as room dividers allow spaces to be kept light and open whilst still defining the boundary.

1. Pot Plants on Free Standing Shelves

Free standing shelves pot plants

insideout.com.au plants on free-standing shelves as room dividers

insideout.com.au use multiple smaller plants on a free-standing shelf unit to create this effective room divider. The combination of the boxy lines of the shelves with the lush and leafy plants creates a definite but soft divide that maximises the greenery on display.

Light can still travel through the shelves and the space remains open and welcoming. Tantalising glimpses of what is on the other side can be had through the gaps in the leaves. Yet the physicality of the shelves keeps the zones separate.

This principle works well in an office or a restaurant area where space needs to be distinct but still remain communal and social.

free-standing shelves with potted plants creates an airy room divide

Conclusion Office by DZAP free-standing shelves with potted plants creates an airy room divider

DZAP, Heerlen fluently demonstrates the same principle in this project for Conclusion Office (as featured on retaildesignblog.net). Here, the ratio of plant to shelf space is smaller granting an even greater sense of transparency. The seating area is defined but open and remains connected to the rest of the interior.

It’s a very versatile look: swap or combine the plants with ceramics or books to change the look from leafy and fresh to thoughtful and contemplative. This style, evocative of art galleries and libraries, would also suit an urban coffee house.

Get the look:

Combine open, free-standing shelving units with Floresy’s ferns in galvanised pots. Or if capitalising on the mystery beyond the barrier interests you, why not try these herbs in glass pots that allow even more light to pass through. 


2. Low divides for seated areas

Room dividers need not be high level. In an office, where everyone is typically seated, the divide can be kept lower. This maximises the sense of space and makes for easier quick conversations over the dividers promoting communication and collaboration among workers.

This also works well for waiting areas and lobbies. Clients are able to sit and relax whilst striking the right balance between feeling suitably private but not hidden (and likely to be forgotten or missed).

This display from idealhome.co.uk uses the same principle in a living space. But the same set-up would look at home in a trendy office environment (maybe even the shoes). Plus the use of cupboards also offers much-needed storage space adding practicality to ornamentation.

Low room divider with large leaf plants

Low room divider with large leaf plants also provides storage

In this Miami hotel lounge, designed by Meyer Davis, the use of plants to divide the seating areas is subtle but effective. Sitting on the pristine white sofas, the delicate fronds of the ferns are just high enough to give privacy. But also low enough so as to not distract from the height of the featured, painted banyan tree trunks.

 

Meyer Davis designed hotel lounge

Hotel lounge uses low planting to offer seated privacy.

Get the look:

Floresy offers many choices of plants and trees that would look great as a low-level room divider. The bushy nature of these Schefflera plants is perfect for creating screens.

Choose a low-level container to place on the ground or a trough-style planter if positioning on top of low storage furniture.

Or why not go retro with these floor standing small bamboo trees? At 120cm and in an attractive pot they are tall enough to provide a screen when seated.

 


3. Use trees to create impact and atmosphere

Often the use of trees indoors is to create a central or focal point to a lobby or other large space. But here, the small and medium-sized trees create a seating zone, offer privacy and form an attractive feature. Clusters of palms of varying height and variety create a lavish and tropical screen in this hotel lobby at the EDITION hotel, Miami. The elegant white planters reflect the white marble floors and light coloured upholstery.

Trees in hotel lobby

Miami Beach Edition lobby creates impact and atmosphere using trees.

Broad-leafed trees at Sony Music Entertainment’s Amsterdam HQ create a secluded spot in the corner of their office. The palette of greens and soft turquoises in the furnishings and planters blend to create a peaceful sea-green oasis.

The room dividers here are less of a physical barrier and offer more of a screen. So move through the trees and enter the seclusion under the canopy of exotic leaves.

Broad leafed trees and plants offer seclusion in an open plan office

Broad-leafed trees and plants offer seclusion in an open plan office

 

Get the look:

This deluxe Kentia palm tree at 225cm adds an instant tropical yet relaxed feel to an interior. Also available in smaller sizes. The palm combines beautifully with the big, waxy leaves of the Alocasia Calidora. The generous leaf size lends itself to creating privacy. Finish the look with a selection of stylish containers from Floresy’s range of planters and pots.

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