Do you remember the time “faux” plants looked…fake?

Nowadays, with advancements in manufacturing techniques and new materials, it’s often easy to mistake artificial plants for the real thing!

But when did the use of faux plants actually become part of home and commercial life? And what exactly are their origins?

Back in Time

No one can quite pin down the exact timeframe of artificial/faux plants inception. However, they can be traced as far back as the Egyptian and Roman era. The materials used back then would have been radically different, but the art and ingenuity of production were just as intricate as the designs that you see today. Floral wreaths were made using thin stained plates of animal horn. Materials such as copper, silver and gilt were also utilised to represent flora and fauna when deemed symbolic or appropriate. 

It is fitting that China is a major producer of faux plants. According to historians, this was where they originated from. Although early artificial designs were somewhat crude —  using twisted ribbon and wire — the Chinese then went on to harness the use of silk in their productions to add an unrivalled flourish at the time. The mini-masterpieces were only enjoyed by the privileged few who could afford such artisan wares.

Often, the ladies of the Imperial Family ordered them to be worn in their hair. The trend spread beyond the confines of the palace walls, influencing the masses who were desperate to emulate their social superiors.

Origins of the Artificial Plant

Moving Ahead

With each century came more developments and from many of them in Europe. Over in 12th Century Italy, various groups of Artisans begin crafting unique and eye-catching faux flowers using silkworm cocoons. 

Then — in the 15th Century — the French began crafting their own faux-fauna and surpassed the workmanship of their other European rivals. After the French Revolution, some of these Artisans fled to Britain and found a gaggle of wealthy patrons eager to purchase their wares.

The Victorian era was another benchmark for faux-fauna. Dazzling and opulent arrangements were made using a combination of both fresh and faux flowers. Whilst still utilising silk, other materials (crepe, velvet and muslin etc) were also brought in to embellish the ever-expanding range of designs.

Florists in the 1920’s used faux-fauna to supplement fresh arrangements. When certain flowers were out of season,  this was a great way to meet demand.

Silk - Origins of the Artificial Plant

Present Day Faux

With modern-day production techniques, we’re now in the enviable position of being able to create a sophisticated product that offers durability and long life whilst emulating live fauna.

The future journey of artificial plant and flower production is likely to mirror its illustrious past. Especially as it allows people to be enveloped by a beautiful representation from nature — without the hassle of constant upkeep.

What’s not to like?

It won’t come as much of a surprise that the wedding design industry is big business and least of all in the floral department. In fact, the wedding service industry was estimated to be worth at least £10 billion last year and that was in the UK alone.

According to various sources, the average newly-engaged couple will be looking to spend about 8-10% of their nuptials budget on floral arrangements for their big day. A hefty chunk when you consider all the expenditures that go into planning the wedding as a whole.

Flowers are always going to be an essential detail for any wedding design, but they don’t necessarily have to be real to create an everlasting impression.

7 pros to using artificial flowers in wedding designs

  1. They are hardy! No more wilting and shrivelling – especially during the heat of summer when so many weddings take place. In fact, they’re ready to go from the initial ordering process to the time of the big day itself.
  2. Artificial flowers also tend to be a lot lighter. This also applies to the various centrepieces as they won’t need a water source. This is important when it comes to transportation and hanging installations in the venue space. No water source = no water splash = one less thing to worry about! 
  3. Takes the stress away! You don’t have to order the flowers to arrive last minute so they are as fresh as possible or worry about them turning up on time. Artificial flowers can be ordered way in advance and then be lightly dusted and adjusted before they are actually needed. Also, if you are arranging them yourself this gives you plenty of time to play around with arrangements without having to constantly keep buying fresh ones.
  4. Allergies! If there are concerns that a wedding guest may sneeze through the ceremony or start sputtering through the speeches then this may be a good way to eliminate the fear of a sudden pollen attack ruining everyone’s day.
  5. The couple gets to keep them forever! This element of a couple’s special day will be frozen in time if that’s their wish. 
  6. Once their primary use is complete, the wedding display can then double up as a great gift of thanks to the bridal party.
  7. You don’t have to wait for the right season for a particular flower to appear! It’s the couple’s big day so their choices are widened by going down the artificial route.

Here are some great faux wedding design ideas:

Table setting 

Secret Garden – Peony Garland

Outdoor wedding 

Wisteria Tree 300cm     

Grand entrance 

Modern Eclectic – Amaryllis

Although you may not have the smell of fresh flowers, the versatility that faux-flora and fauna have to offer quashes any worries on that front. This is all about getting maximum impact with a minimum amount of stress and disruption. Plus, it’s about creating a lasting reminder of a beautiful day.

Could you or any of your employees benefit from great outdoor space at work?

In today’s working environment, the economic pressures are high and the demands to succeed are intense. It’s no wonder lunch breaks are slowly becoming a thing of the past for many and adding to stress levels.

Space for employees to remove themselves from staring at their screens and recharge for a moment equals smart business thinking. A breath of fresh air feels like the best thing in the world if you’re bogged down by work. It delivers that much-needed energy boost and clarity of mind – which in turn leads to a more productive workplace.

According to a poll undertaken by hospitality specialist Sodexo and the nonprofit health body Ukactive, 800 British workers they surveyed only took an average of 22 minutes for their lunch breaks.

How employees can benefit 

Taking a short break every couple of hours from a tough work schedule helps employees keep in good shape physically, mentally and emotionally, considerably improving productivity.

Spending as little as 20 minutes a day outside can:

  • reduce stress
  • improve memory and concentration
  • restore mental energy 
  • encourage team building
  • improve social interaction

How to Create an Outdoor Office Space

  1. Plants, plants and more plants

    Fill the space with (you guessed it) … plants. As a business, things can get busy and stressful at times, so the last thing you may be thinking about is tending to green spaces and making sure it looks luscious all year round. Try a low maintenance version of a botanical garden by opting for artificial plants. You can still mix in live plants for the extra wow factor. Grow herbs or vegetables. Or, plant flowers and grasses and create a space that attracts butterflies and pollinators.
  2. Seating

    If you really want to entice employees into using the outdoor space, provide comfortable seating where they can enjoy lunch, take a moment to themselves or even have a catch up with colleagues. 
  3. Walking Trails

    For larger spaces with land. A walking trail would be a great way to get out, take in some fresh air and get some vitamin D. For an extra endorphin boost,  this could be a great time of the day for a run or team walk.
  4. Outdoor Grilling Station

    If you really want to splash out, how about a grilling station? This would make a fabulous way for the team to get together on a Friday afternoon.

With the pressures placed on today’s workforce, it is important to remember that employees need to detach from their screens and take those all-important regular breaks.   

Giving employees an opportunity to untether themselves from technology is one more step on the ladder to staff retainment and loyalty.

Open your hotel to remote workers and reap the benefits

The number of remote workers is increasing. The Office of National Statistics predicts that 50% of UK employees will be remotely working to some degree by 2020. London alone already has more than a million people who regularly work from cafes, restaurants and other public spaces. D&D London is catering to the coworking market when it opens five of their restaurants to remote workers in June.

As the number of remote workers increases so too does demand for quality remote workspaces. A Guestline survey states that 1 in 4 remote workers feel there aren’t enough hotels that cater to the remote working market.

So, how can your hospitality business benefit from this shift in how we work and encourage digital nomads into your premises?

What is remote working?

A remote worker is someone who works outside a traditional office environment or in a different location to their employer/client.

Remote workers include freelancers and the self-employed who may not have dedicated business premises other than their home. But also includes employed staff who can choose to “work from home” either full-time or part-time aka a remote employee.

Why is remote working increasing?

Being able to work remotely has been empowered by both technology and attitude. Laptops, mobile devices and wifi have given workers the freedom to move away from a desk and therefore also out of the office. Cloud technology allows access to central information from anywhere. Plus video calling and collaboration software such as Slack negates the need for face-to-face communication.

The types of roles have also changed with an increase in tech- or service-orientated jobs. Plus there’s been a cultural shift in our understanding the importance of a good work/life balance that has helped facilitate the shift towards remote working.

What remote workspaces do remote workers choose to work from?

Remote workers are resourceful and creative in where they choose to work:

  • Work from home: not everyone has a study or home office so this can often be on the sofa, at the kitchen table or even in bed.
  • Use a coworking office: remote workers can hire deskspace in a shared office that includes shared office equipment plus other people to chat or network with.
  • Coffee shops and libraries: many public spaces offer free wifi to their patrons. Coffee shops also offer refreshments whereas libraries offer peace and quiet.
  • Your hotel lobby or restaurant: hospitality businesses are beginning to tap into the remote worker market. Read on to find out more.

Remote workers workspace

Remote worker finds a quiet spot to work.

What are the benefits of remote working?

The benefits to the worker and their employee are significant:

  • Workers have a better work/life balance
  • Environment benefits from less commuting and travel
  • Remote working means happier and less stressed employees
  • Remote workers are outperforming office workers with increases in productivity
  • Cost savings for the employer in operating overheads including needing smaller offices.

Is coworking and remote working the same thing?

Not always. A coworking space, where individuals can rent a desk or office space to suit their needs, could be viewed as a regular or traditional place of work – it’s still an office after all. Freelancers and self-employed people are more likely to use a coworking space than a remote employee.

The shared amenities and opportunities to meet and chat with other workers are much like a typical office with similar distractions of the open plan office. However, not all coworking spaces are equal. The rise of the remote worker has also led to the rise in the choice of coworker spaces.

Benefits of opening your hotel to remote workers

Many hotels and restaurants struggle to fill their premises during the day. Tapping into the remote worker market can help boost many aspects of your hospitality business:

  • Increase footfall during quieter times of the day
  • Existing guests will benefit from the workspaces too
  • Encourages contractors and business travellers to your hotel
  • Brings new people into your business who may not have otherwise visited
  • Promotes the use of your function rooms for business purposes
  • Creates a vibrant ambience: your establishment is a popular venue!
  • More sales of beverages, snacks and lunches. How about a remote worker “lunchtime special”?
  • Benefit from word of mouth recommendations.

empty hotel lobby remote workers

An empty lobby during the day isn’t earning you anything.

How to encourage remote workers into your business

Wifi and Connectivity

The biggest factor that will attract remote workers into your lobby is the quality of the internet connection. It needs to be fast, reliable and secure. Show that you welcome remote workers by displaying the information about your free wifi and how to connect to it.

Ambient noise levels

Most remote workers will opt for a quieter workspace (but there are those who thrive in busier environments). So, ambient and background noise is acceptable whereas loud voices are less desirable. Consider how close the coworking space is to the kitchen, front desk, toilets or other areas that are noisier and busier.

Comfort

Your hotel lobby or lounge is probably already a comfortable space. Think about keeping seating in smaller groups and add side or coffee tables. Natural light is best but bear in mind that harsh lighting can increase screen glare.

Privacy

Feeling you have your own space within which to work is true for remote workers as much as it for those confined to a traditional office desk. A sense of workspace privacy is vital:

  • Use plants as room dividers and screens to create privacy.
  • Experiment with different seating and table heights to define zones and options for the remote worker.
  • Create smaller working spaces and a larger meeting room area with your furniture layouts.
  • Keep furniture lower level if you’re tight on space to create a better feeling of space.

Facilities

Are you able to offer device charging facilities or provide access to a printer? Some devices are power hungry so access to sockets is likely to be a dealbreaker for most remote workers. Consider offering free tea, coffee and water as well.

Free vs Paid Coworking space

If you’re are considering a paid coworking space you’ll need to ensure you can consistently offer all of the above. So the decision to offer a rentable space will depend on how much space you can dedicate to coworking. Plus both your location and existing infrastructure. If you’re not in an area of higher-demand – such as a city or large town – then you might not attract enough remote workers to make it viable.

The benefits listed above still apply to a free remote workspace. If encouraging remote workers into your premises helps your business feel vibrant and sells a few more covers and coffees each day, then what do you have to lose?


Floresy is a supplier of artificial plants and trees to hotels, restaurants and commercial businesses in London and across the UK.

Wellness tourism is booming. But you don’t have to be a health spa to take advantage of this trend in travellers. Here are some ideas that any hotel can implement to help appeal to the wellness tourist:

Promote good sleep

As a hotelier, you know that getting a good night’s sleep is a key factor in getting a good review and seeing repeat business. Whilst you may already be proud of the quality of your bedrooms, are you using it in your marketing?

Getting good sleep is paramount to health and wellbeing just as getting exercise and eating a balanced diet. So, go the extra step and help achieve a high sleep quality for your customers:

  • Help your guests avoid caffeine and alcohol before bedtime. A fruit and oat smoothie is a better option than a nightcap as the oats and dairy contain sleep-inducing compounds. 
  • Blackout curtains and/or eyemasks will help eliminate unwanted light
  • With people coming and going, it isn’t always easy to reduce noise levels, especially in urban areas. So how about complimentary ear plugs for all your guests?
  • Give your guests the option of no TV in their room.

You can help set the mood from the very moment your guests arrive and create a relaxed lobby. The use of plants and greenery to bring your guests closer to nature will have a beneficial effect. 

Review your menu

One of the best things about staying in a hotel is someone else does the cooking (and the washing up). For many travellers, this is an opportunity to indulge. However, for a wellness hotel, this may be an opportunity to indulge your guests in healthier options as well: 

  • Ensure you offer healthy, balanced meal options on your menu.
  • Consider including calorie information. This helps your wellness guest make informed choices about when they indulge.
  • Local and organic produce has long been a staple for many hoteliers and is a must for a wellness hotel. To push this further, you could include information about the local producers such as the ethics behind their business.
  • Include more plant-based choices on your menus – and make them accessible. How about an indulgent (and not particularly healthy) vegetarian main course? Better for the planet but also good for the soul. Avoid treating gluten-free or vegan options as afterthoughts. 

Find out about wellness activities in your area

What is there to do near you that would appeal to a wellness traveller? Activities or experiences that will help relax or enlighten are perfect and why not try them out yourself first so you can give informed advice. Show your prospective guests there are lots to choose from near your hotel. It also helps create a stress-free experience when you’ve done the legwork. Activities to consider include:

  • Yoga, meditation or alternative therapies.
  • Walking groups or maps for local walking routes or sightseeing tours
  • Expressive and creative activities such as drawing or painting classes, craft experiences like weaving or woodworking.

You can also bring the activities to your guests and organise events in your hotel.

Dare to drop the WiFi?

Whilst ditching guest WiFi altogether might be a bit drastic, how about a technology-free zone somewhere in your hotel. No phones, tablets or laptops allowed. This helps create a relaxing and stress-free zone for travellers looking to escape.

Got gym facilities? Promote them.

Whilst fitness is probably secondary to relaxation, exercise and mental health are closely connected. And a hotel gym is a great asset so make sure your guests know about. However, perhaps consider the choice of words when promoting your gym. To attract a wellness traveller, its often more about de-stressing and being active than it is about working out or getting ‘pumped’.

If you don’t have gym facilities, is there a local gym that offers day passes? How about the optional extra for guests to have an exercise bike or a yoga mat in their room for the duration of their stay? Make sure you have a solution for the physically active wellness tourist.

What to take away for your Wellness Hotel

Wellness isn’t all about exercise and healthy eating. It’s a holistic approach to looking after the mind and body. So take a step back and think about what really makes people feel happy and healthy and implement that in your business.

Floresy can help set the mood with some well-chosen artificial plants and trees. Our products are low-maintenance, realistic and perfect for your wellness hotel vibe.

 

Wellness tourism has a global worth of $639 billion. In 2017, there were over 830 million wellness trips representing 17% of all global tourism. Plus the average wellness traveller spends more per trip than the average tourist. Spending by wellness tourists is 53% more when travelling internationally and 178% more for domestic travel.

What’s more, is the forecast for growth. Global wellness tourism is growing at an annual rate of 7.5% which is notably faster than the overall tourism growth prediction. The industry’s value is set to reach $919 billion by 2022 and surpass the 1 billion wellness trips per year.

So why is wellness tourism growing so fast?

What is Wellness Tourism?

Wellness tourism is a vacation, holiday or short break that puts your wellbeing at the centre of your experience. Travellers seek to relieve stress, regain a balance, pursue a personal passion or life goal or to simply kick-start a new healthier lifestyle.

Examples of a wellness trip include:

wellness tourism infographic

Wellness tourism infographic

  • Holidays that give the opportunity for reconnecting with nature either through their location or through activities they offer such as 
  • Yoga retreats are popular choices as they combine physical and spiritual stimulation with relaxation, calm and inward reflection.
  • Activity-based holidays aimed at those seeking physical exhilaration.
  • Creative-themed holidays where travellers can attend creative writing boot camps or artists’ retreats.
  • Cultural experiences that seek to connect people with other cultures or religions. 

Wellness destinations are not health farms where the objective is weight loss. Neither is it travelling to another country seeking medical treatment. A wellness hotel – one that promotes quality sleep, healthy food and freedom from stress is a simple example of a wellness destination.

So, why is wellness tourism growing so fast?

Wellness is the tonic to the stresses of modern life and is a growing trend. Wellness dumps the fad diets and fitness crazes for a more holistic approach to health. People are realising that they are in control of their own good health. 

Wellness promotes healthy ageing

Our population is ageing. In 2015, 12.3% of the world’s population was aged 60 or over. That’s around 901 million people. By 2030, this is projected to increase to 1.4 billion or 16.4% of the world’s population. And he over 85s age range will show the biggest growth.

The baby boomer generation, those currently in their 60s and early 70s, want good health to get the best out of their later years. Plus they have the money, time and conviction to make their health goals a priority.

Being in better health as we age means that our growing population will not create an equal impact on healthcare. We don’t want to be a burden or to lose purpose as we age, and the pursuit of wellness allows us to remain independent and vibrant.

Wellness empowers people

The pursuit of wellness is not dependent on firstly consulting healthcare professional. People are able to make well-informed, proactive decisions about their lives independently.

One of the biggest shifts in healthcare is the balance or power or knowledge between a patient and their doctor. The wealth of information available to us as individuals is partly responsible for this shift.

People are realising that prevention is better than cure. So improving our health means that we are in control of our health choices. We are less dependent on a prescription or drug and therefore a faceless, third party like Big Pharma.

The wellness industry is booming

Naturally, as the overall wellness industry grows so too does wellness tourism. The popularity of mindfulness apps and plant-based diets are growing and many aspects of wellness are accessible and low cost.

Wellness brings global philosophies

Exploring other cultures can give a traveller a connection to the past, a fresh understanding of themselves or a simple sense of the one world identity. New ways of thinking can bring rejuvenation and a new zeal for life. We can access tai chi in Western countries but nothing beats the authenticity of morning practice in Bejing, for example.

How can Floresy help?

We can help create a welcoming environment for your wellness guests using our experience as interior plant landscapers. Wellness tourists may have expectations on the style and quality of the venues they choose and we can help your business meet that expectation. Find out more about our artificial plants for hotels or contact us today to speak to one of our customer managers.

Does an office without boundaries create division among workers?

An open-plan office should be a collaborative space, right? A place where workers interact and communicate without hindrance by boundaries such as cubical walls and room dividers. But despite this seemingly obvious statement, the opposite is truer. Open plan office productivity from collaboration is a myth.

A recent study looked at the impact of ‘open’ workspaces on human collaboration. It found that the amount of face-to-face communication dropped by 70% while electronic communication increased by up to 50%.

How was collaboration measured?

Researchers followed two firms during a planned layout change from a cubicle-dominated office to an open plan style. Both firms were Fortune 500 multi-nationals who were about to redesign an office at their head office. The researchers recorded the employee’s behaviours before and after the layout change.

Prior studies looking to measure productivity and collaboration in the workplace have relied upon surveys and activity logging by the workers. This study, by Ethan S. Bernstein and Stephen Turban of Havard University, instead employed a wearable tech device or ‘sociometric badge’.

wearable tech measures open plan office productivity

Sociometric badge measures collaboration in the open-plan office

The badge recorded their face-to-face interactions. The devices worked when they came in close proximity to another badge i.e. when the participants were interacting. The aim of the device was to capture a great deal of data:

  • An infrared sensor captured whom they were facing
  • A microphone captured whether they were talking or listening (without recording what was said for privacy).
  • A movement sensor captured body movement and posture
  • Plus a Bluetooth sensor to record their location within the office

The first study had 52 participants (about 40% of the total workers) and monitored them for 15 working days before the transition. The study used a settling-in period of two months to allow for the changes to become embedded. The monitoring of the participants then continued for another 15 days within their new office environment.

A second study further tested the results from the first study. One hundred employees (roughly 45%) agreed to participate and were monitored using the badges.

This time, monitoring of the participants lasted for eight weeks prior to the redesign and eight weeks after the move. This second study also included the two-month settling-in period.

What were the open plan office productivity results?

Both studies saw a fall in face-to-face communication decrease of around 70%. Email and messaging went up by between 20% to 50% and accounts for some of that lost interaction. 

It seems that, when working within an open-plan setting, workers would seek to create their own “privacy” by isolating themselves. For example, people wear large headphones to appear busy. Or they choose to use electronic communication forms instead.

There is a basic human desire for privacy. Evidence supports that acting on that desire can help productivity. In other words, we don’t like feeling observed. This study also touches on how ‘collective intelligence’ works. It’s a new concept but there could be an optimum amount of stimulation that promotes higher levels of this type of ‘hive-mind’ intelligence. And open-place offices may be too stimulating.

The study sums up the findings “In short… open architecture appeared to trigger a natural human response to socially withdraw from officemates…”

How to use plants to create more privacy in your workplace

It seems that the best office layouts include a variety of different working spaces. Here are some ideas to easily adapt an existing workspace for better open plan office productivity:

  • Avoid desks where the worker’s back faces a walkway or corridor. It makes employees feel on-show plus its bad Feng Shui.
  • Read our blog on how to use plants are room dividers.
  • Include comfortable seating areas without any desks that promote conversation.
  • Take advantage of the open-plan design to create collaborative areas away from people’s desks.
  • Create privacy screens from office dividers or plants such as bamboo to help workers feel more enclosed.
  • Make sure any open-plan areas aren’t overfilled with desks. Respect your employee’s sense of personal space.
  • Always include private working stations or pods that allow employees to focus on work undisturbed.

Floresy is always ready to help solve any office layout dilemmas using our years of experience with commercial interiors. 

 

A survey of 2000 UK workers by Mindspace (a co-working and collaborative workspace provider), uncovered some disconcerting opinions among employees. A surprising 16% of 18 to 24-year-olds said that they had left a job because of its poor workplace design. A further 31% of workers felt their current work environment was uninspiring, while 28% stated that their workplace is simply outdated and dull.

Another study by Office Genie in 2017, a whacking 45% of employees were frustrated at the lack of collaborative spaces in their place of work. And 20% actually stated that their work environment hindered their ability to do their job.

So how does a modern business attract, and retain, the more discerning generation of employees a.k.a. the millennials? What can office design do to improve worker happiness? Would adopting resimmercial design help with your businesses recruitment challenges?

What is resimmercial design?

The word ‘resimmercial’ is a blend of two words: residential and commercial. And this is exactly what resimmercial design is all about – blending home and work life. By creating spaces that are more home-like and less like a place of work, designers are hoping to make the office a more comfortable place to be.

Resimmercial design follows on from commercial spaces that have introduced more creativity to their premises. Sometimes, that may have been through necessity such as the “hot-desking” concept. Other reasons include wanting to change the atmosphere to make it more productive or relaxed.

Resimmercial design

Workplaces that feel more like home. Resimmercial design.

The main principles are creating spaces that feel warm, welcoming and homely plus flexibility for employees with different working preferences. This is predominantly achieved by opting for non-traditional office furniture, moving away from neutral tones and adding more natural textures into the work environment.

What are the features of resimmercial design?

Communal and casual areas

Think less “open-plan office” and more hotel lobby. These areas are lounge spaces with casual seating arrangements that are conducive to conversation. But likewise, a good resimmercial space also more secluded spots for those times when someone needs a quiet place to work.

Multi-functional spaces

By assigning less purpose to a space you allow it to adapt to the needs of the people working there. A room isn’t a meeting room because it’s just another space that could be used for a meeting. Is that a coffee bar or a standing desk? The user decides.

Soft edges and rich textures

That oh-so-typical modular office furniture is replaced with less ‘officey’ pieces often in vibrant colours or natural materials such as wood, cork or bamboo. There are more fabric coverings in a resimmercial space including tactile velvets, prints and other interesting textures. Just like all the curtains, carpets, cushions and upholstery that you would expect to find in a comfortable home.

Resimmercial design is a relaxing work environment

Resimmercial feels like you could be working whilst sitting on your sofa at home

Closer to nature

Resimmercial design often incorporates biophilic principles too. The use of plants helps to create a healthy and relaxing environment As does other natural materials such as stone and water. There may even be a fish tank (ok, that’s very “dentist’s waiting room” and nothing new but, aw, look at the fishies!).

Why choose resimmercial for your office?

An important factor that influences a millennial’s decision making, whether it is spending money or choosing a company to work for, is the ethics and authenticity of a brand or employer. Creating positive working environments shows a commitment to staff welfare above and beyond what any brochure or HR person can demonstrate. And this will be important for any prospective millennial candidate.

Once you’ve attracted talented people to your business it’s important to retain them. The cost of hiring a new employee can cost as much as what you’re paying them. Offering a flexible work environment will help to keep your employees happy and productive. Of course, flexibility must include options for not working in the office in the first place. Reducing staff turnover helps reduce the overall cost of recruitment.

Stress and the mental health of our colleagues is a serious topic. Ping pong tables and breakout areas aren’t remedies for depression. But sympathetic resimmercial design can, in part, offer a less intense working environment for anyone going through a mental illness.

Get it right and the result is fresh, valued and happy staff. And since happiness is a powerhouse, this can lead to improvements in productivity, better work/life balance and fewer sick days. It’s a win-win.

Happy workers in resimmercial office

Ok, there’s a happy worker and then there’s this guy.

Of course, this flexible, adaptable and spontaneous office design could not exist without the advent of mobile computing. WiFi and other technologies that have freed us from the standard 1.5m power cable “leash” are fueling this office place revolution. But is the idea of a progressive workplace anything new? Read our blog post on the history of office design to find out.

 

Plants for restaurant tables can be that finishing touch that really completes the customer experience. Whether you prefer foliage over flowers, a considered table display can complete the branding you’ve worked hard to establish.

Things to consider when choosing a plant include:

  • Size of the plant. You don’t want the display to interfere with your guests being able to see each other. Also, a larger display takes up valuable table space.
  • Cost is an important factor for plants or flowers for restaurant tables because of the number required, especially for medium or larger sized establishments.
  • Maintenance is another cost. Using fresh flowers quickly adds up either in the cost of cut blooms or the labour required for watering and keeping the plants looking healthy.
  • Repeatability is an important factor for controlling the customer experience at every table in your restaurant. Seating guests at a table with a drooping plant or a flower that is passed it’s best does not make that guest feel valued.

If you are looking for plants to add character to your restaurant tables but that are also cost-effective, artificial plants are an option worth exploring. Here is a hand-picked list of suggestions from the Floresy product range.

Succulents as plants for restaurant tables

Succulents are a fabulous choice for a restaurant table plants. They are a popular and trendy plant plus because they are low-growing won’t interrupt the diner’s view across the table. They are also relatively neutral in their appeal so they can fit in with most interiors.

These succulents in dark grey pots are great for either a moodier or more masculine theme. With four plants for only £45, they are great for your budget too.

artificial succulents mix in dark grey pot

Artificial succulent mix in contemporary dark grey pots will suit a masculine or even an oriental-styled interior

 For a restaurant with a more organic or rustic feel, these succulents in glass jars (complete with hemp string) are a good match.

succulents as plants for restaurant tables

Succulents in glass jars are a perfect match to a rustic interior.

Miniature individual artificial succulents as plants for restaurant tables

Miniature individual artificial succulents – they are just too cute!

These are mini individual succulents in white pots and come in a set of six are super-budget friendly working out at just £4.50 per plant. In addition, they are a great choice if space is a premium on your table. You can use them individually but you can also cluster them in groups of threes.

If you want to continue with succulents in your restaurant interior, Floresy has many more artificial succulents to choose from. They are a great cost-effective plant to choose and because of their size, also a really flexible option for any business. Plus they are on trend! Why not visit our shop to see what else we can offer your business’ decor.

Flowers for restaurant tables

These sweet and elegant displays of grape hyacinths would be a welcome addition to both a traditional French restaurant or a farmhouse-style gastropub. Whilst a taller offering at 46cm in height, they are slender and the delicate hyacinth won’t intrude on the view of your guests.

Grape hyacinth in tall glass table display

Let’s get blooming grape hyacinth in tall display glass

A good choice if you want a sunnier flower are these kalanchoes in shallow pots. Choose from white, yellow or pink, the combination of flowers at different stages of blooming really add to their delightful and sunny appeal.

Artificial kalanchoe flowers in pots

Kalanchoes are in a shallow pots making them perfect flowers for restaurant tables or as summer bedding plants on a patio.

These mini anthuriums have a striking flower and come in a set of three in a choice of pink, red or white/cream flower. Additionally, they come unpotted. This means that by using a pot or container of your choice, you can create an individual look. Add your own flavour to truly match the decor of your business. The flowers have an architectural quality so lend themselves to more modern or contemporary settings.

Artificial anthurium plant

Artificial mini anthuriums come in a set of three in a colour of your choice.

How about some lavender flowers for restaurant tables? Both a flower and a herb, these would be at home in any kitchen-restaurant. Equally, they suit French cuisine and conversely a traditional English pub. The rustic appeal of the pots would also suit a tea room or country cafe. As these lavenders come in four different sizes you can choose them to fit your table sizes. Or use them in other places on your premises to compliment the design such as any waiting stations.

Lavender in galvanised tin pots by Floresy

Artificial lavender from Floresy comes in a variety of sizes to suit your needs.

Benefits of using artificial plants for restaurant tables

One of the key benefits of using artificial plants for restaurant tables is that they are storable. This gives your business’ decor flexibility to adapt with the seasons or with layout changes. This is especially useful if you hold events or private functions at your restaurant. Frequently changes the number of tables in use means displays become can become redundant. Your artificial plant won’t fade or die whilst in storage. They will be in perfect condition when you take them out of storage to use them again.

You can find more information on how Floresy can help your hospitality business by reading our artificial plants for restaurants page.