As we fight to improve our impact on the planet, environmental issues have never been more important. All industries are taking a long hard look at their business models and how they can make improvements in order to lessen their carbon footprint. 

The building and construction industry is no exception.

What is a Sustainable Building?

By its very nature, the building and construction industry is a big drain on natural resources. 

According to The World Green Building Council, buildings and construction are responsible for 39% of global energy-related carbon emissions. 

So, the aim of sustainable building is to carry out activities without depleting natural resources and reducing the industry’s impact on the environment

How Can Construction and Building be Sustainable 

So what can the industry do in order to build sustainably:

  1. Explore the refurbishment of existing buildings, reusing/recycling materials.
  2. Carefully deconstruct green buildings once they have come to the end of their use and reuse the materials in further constructions.
  3. Design with sustainability in mind, aiming for longterm energy efficiency and emission reduction. 
  4. Make considered choices on the construction of buildings, procuring green and responsibly-sourced materials and taking into consideration their transportation to site.
  5.  Ensure buildings are energy-efficient, using less water and creating minimal waste. 

Examples of Sustainable Buildings Around the World

Sustainable does not have to be boring. In fact, this is the perfect time for innovative thinking to really come into play. Here are some examples of sustainability that will drop jaws as well as carbon emission.

Bosco Verticale (Milan, Italy)

Fighting air pollution has never looked so awe-inspiringly beautiful. 

Opening 2014, the Milan’s Bosco Verticale, or “vertical forest” comprises two 27-storey residential high-rises, planted with almost 900 trees and more than 2,000 shrubs and bushes. 

Equipped with solar panels and greywater recycling, this extensive greenery provides residents with shade in the summer and filtered sunlight in the winter. As well as being aesthetically pleasing, the botanical life also provides cleaner air and reduced noise pollution.

Bosco Verticale

Bahrain World Trade Center (Manama, Bahrain)

This unprecedented design, featuring 42-storey wind turbines, has won several awards.  Designed by the architect Atkins, it incorporates renewable energy into its large-scale building design. 

Bahrain World Trade Center

Nanyang Technological University, School of Art, Design and Media (Nanyang, Singapore)

Completed in July 2006 and officially opening in April 2009, the university is regarded as a sophisticated icon in design.

The spectacular sloped grass roofs of this four-storey building go beyond aesthetic. It not only doubles as a communal space but keeps the environmental temperature low, reducing heat in the day.

Nanyang Technological University

The building and construction industry is forever pushing innovative boundaries. Reaching for a way to reconnect with nature may inspire the industry to find a greater appreciation for the environment thus putting sustainability at the forefront of every design.

Trade shows are an excellent way to demonstrate the value of your product or service. It’s a big investment in terms of time and cost so careful consideration must be taken when deciding whether you want to actually exhibit. But, once you have decided to go ahead, that’s when you need to come up with an effective strategy.

Pre-Trade show 

Finding the Right Show

Beware – a trade show can be oversaturated. Maybe a show that is not specific to your product or service but where your brand is still relevant could work. For example, if you trade in the gift market then consider exhibiting at a literary trade show. Bookshops thrive on till-point add ons which may work perfectly with what you have to offer.

Stand Design

Like everything else, it is important to get organised as early as possible to allow for any last-minute changes so any contractors that you have hired are not forced to cut corners at the eleventh hour.

Promotion and Appointments

Make sure you are promoting your attendance well in advance. Brands often begin promoting for the following year straight after the current trade show has wrapped up. At the same time – to ensure that you make the most of the event – schedule all of your appointments. Not only does this help make your stand look in demand, it also ensures that you have the relevant visitors at your booth. Passersby notice these things!

The Stand 

Finishing Touches

Exhibition halls can be vast and somewhat sterile. Why don’t you bring a bit of the outside in by adding artificial plants? They can be ordered in advance, unlike real flowers that would need to be ordered last minute to ensure freshness. Once you are finished, you can then place them in storage to be reused for the next show.

Organise Seating

Consider how long attendees have spent walking the trade show halls. When designing your stand, consider various seating options. This would be useful for meetings, to view the products and to encourage potential buyers to spend more time at your stand.

Banners

Brochures and leaflets can often make a space look cluttered and in this day and age of recycling don’t appear sustainable. A banner can promote your core message whilst also hiding any unsightly items from view.

Giveaways

Gratis promotional items will always draw attention, especially if you use bold colours. Think smart with your designs and use them to your advantage – these items will double as advertising for your brand.

Trade show 

Hands-on

When it comes to your stand, try and have some interactive elements for any potential buyers. This encourages conversation and will lead to the lockdown of any potential new clients.

Engage

As well as having your pre-booked visitors, it’s always important to engage with new business. No need for the hard sell, something as simple as a greeting and an innovative demonstration will suffice. Don’t waste valuable time chatting with fellow stand members as you never know, you could miss that vital sale or important new lead. 

Data Collection

Following on from any interaction you’ll need to tie-up any data collection. So ensure you have allocated a space on your stand for a card bowl, laptop or clipboard so you can gather that all-important information. 

Post Trade show 

Follow-up After the Show

Ensure you immediately follow up with any new leads. Collate further details and fulfil orders etc. Time is key, so don’t leave it so long to allow new contacts the opportunity to change their mind. Some businesses send blanket emails, but whatever you do the more personalised your approach the better. 

The trade show experience that you choose to offer is a perfect moment to bring the creativity of your own brand to any potential customer.

Don’t just turn up with a table and chair and hope for the best!

Even if budgets are tight, do your research. There are a multitude of effective ways that you can promote your company without a hefty price tag attached. But if you don’t have the time and want a slick finish, hire an expert to take the pressure off your hands. 

Our technicians at Floresy will provide you with all the assistance you need to install and implement our designs into your booth. They can show you the best methods for assembly, disassembly and reassembly, and will provide any further technical assistance you require.

If you have any questions or would like to discuss your project in further details please contact us.

As we move away from those glorious summer days with their light airy breeze, we then shift into the crisp and warm tones of autumn.

This reflective season is known for its earthy rich colours and is an exciting time to identify what emerging trends designers want us to see. These new ideas are hopefully reflected in the inspirations of Interior Designers and Architects everywhere.

Here are some top tips to revamp your space in a bid to re-energize and rejuvenate the ambience of any potential project.

Natural Fibres

cain

Credit @abbeylanghome and @bakerfurniture

The timeless material of cane has been resurrected in the last few years. It is a strong and intricate natural fibre that has been derived from the rattan vine. Woven together, this durable item can create anything from sumptuous seating, headboards and outdoor furniture that can weather the seasons. Remember! Longevity is key with the use of materials these days and cane certainly meets the demand.

Power of the Curve

Credit: Covethouse

There is something alluring about a curved sofa. With the right material and colour combination, it can change the dynamics of any space or potential project. With the ability to remove harsh angles with its seamless contour, this seating design has the dexterity to welcome anyone with open arms. Think calm, think zen.

Statement Paper

Credit: Murals Wallpaper 

Who doesn’t love florals on a large scale? This is a great trend, but to fully cultivate the style the florals must be sizable and must pop. Mix strong contrasting colours to bring out the beauty in your blooms, compliment with bespoke pieces or individual reclaimed items. Look out for big patterns that have a Pre-Raphaelite style – you’ll find them on cushions, bedding, murals etc. Make the rest of the look simple so the florals themselves become the star and focal point. 

Fringe

Credit: BeauVamp

Lighting is the perfect way to update a room all in one go. It’s a great way to give vintage chic a chance to impress and like many trends that have made their way back to the fore, this one has found its way back from the victorian era, but with a modern twist.

Metallics

Those who wish to do a makeover of their space will find copper the ideal material this autumn. Its warm orange hue is capable of giving a sophisticated and elegant air to any environment. This is a sure bet, especially with Nordic themes or rooms with an industrial style finish.

Interior design, like any other art, is subject to change and allows us all to embrace new styles and trends that emerge throughout the seasons. This autumn isn’t any different and we’re looking forward to seeing your imagination run riot!

Could a bespoke service be the best fit for your organisation?

Whilst mass-produced products may be cheaper or convenient, bespoke products are the best way to ensure that each piece that ends up in your business reflects your brand style, so as to create a harmonious concept.

But what is a bespoke service? It essentially means a custom made product designed just for you.

Having an item designed and made for you provides more flexibility when enhancing the style of the space concerned. It increases your trademark over the whole creative process and enables you to create spaces that may not have been there before, showing your aesthetic vision to the world.

With the right professional guidance, you can be certain that the style and materials are fit for purpose and that the finished piece meets your exacting requirements and budget, big or small. 

artificial lighting bespoke service

4 Benefits of Using a Bespoke Service

  1. Skys the limit:  With mass-produced items, you are always going to be constrained by colour and size and you’ll always feel deflated when you see,  what you thought was a standout look in a rival commercial venue.
  2.  Experts on hand:  Because you are working so closely with an artisan or workshop to get the exact product you desire, you have direct access to experienced and skilled tradesmen. 
  3. Quality not quantity: Working directly with a designer or an artist gives you the added layer of assurance that the bespoke item in question will be built to last – sustainability is key! This is often a concern with mass-production and the carbon footprint that comes with it. 
  4. Space solutions: One of the best things about a bespoke piece is that it will be built to ensure a perfect fit. This can solve the problem of awkward spaces that you want to fill. Even better, you’ll have a unique piece suited to your taste. Central interior tree design bespoke service

Is a Bespoke Service Right for Me? 

Working out whether a bespoke design is right for your business can be tricky to figure out and plan logistically. After all, this custom made product will essentially be built to last. Here are the questions that you should ask yourself to see if this is the right fit.

  • Is quality more important than price?
  • Do you want to stand out with your style choice?
  • Would you like to fill a specific space or dimension?
  • Do you want to ensure you are working with a highly specialised artisan?
  • Would you like an eye-catching feature?
  • Do you need an item that will last?

Why not consider commissioning a design that is as unique as your business?

An Interior Designer may sound like a luxury, but if executed correctly, this could be an investment that might save you time and money.

Whether you are redecorating, refurbishing or undergoing a complete revamp, it is imperative that you get the best advice you can.

So What is an Interior Designer?

An Interior designer is an accredited professional with the knowledge and ability to help you create aesthetically pleasing interior spaces for home, working or public environments. This can cover anything from paint selection and colour palettes, interior landscaping, lighting and furniture choices.

Searching for an Interior Designer

Important Questions to Ask Yourself

Before you begin the actual process of redecoration, you’ll need to ask yourself some questions to help focus your search and prioritise your options.

  • What do you need an Interior Designer for?
  • Is this a large or small project?
  • What is your maximum budget? 
  • How much responsibility do you want to take on yourself?

Where to Find the Perfect Interior Designer?

 
Magazines 

Look at your favourite interiors magazine. Many of the features will credit an interior designer or stylist that has come up with the looks and feel that are currently in vogue. For example, at ElleDecor you can find some inspiring design spaces along with contact details of the creators. 

 
Reviews and Referrals

If you have seen a look or design that you like and admire, then go ahead and ask! What do you have to lose? All you’re doing is complementing their aesthetic choices. With the rapid development of social media – especially Instagram – getting a recommendation has never been easier. Think of the digital world as your mood board,  but always get references and remember to be open-minded whilst still doing your due diligence! There might be an amazing new graduate who can replicate a look from the ‘World of Interiors’ at a price for your budget.

What to Look for in an Interior Designer

 
Qualifications

The British Interior Design Association (BIDA) has a list of accredited members along with a useful guide to the different qualifications. However, don’t stop there! Make sure that you are checking their reviews in detail and that testimonials are genuine. Looking at their body of work as a whole is just as important as looking at the first few reviews.

On the Same Page

You have to make sure that you are being listened to by your Interior Designer. Ensure that you look through the designer’s portfolio comprehensively to make sure they are able to deliver the look you’ve envisioned or whether they have achieved it previously for other clients. The execution of the final look will need to blend with your taste and make the statement you desire.

Working with Your Interior Designer

 
Important Questions

First off – write a list of exact questions. For example, what would their solutions be for any of your concerns? What do they offer as a follow-up package besides the usual snag list? Is the initial appraisal to be part of the deal and can you get a lockdown on the charges involved?

Contract Between Both Parties.

It’s imperative that you draw up a contract that requires each and every decision to be signed off by you both. Start with a mutual understanding of the concept, showing images, fabrics and a colour scheme that is agreed upon. Any Interior Designer should be able to produce a set of drawings for the project along with samples of actual materials. Once you have agreed upon a programme, it can be as simple as watching that original concept slowly take shape.

Choosing the right Interior Designer needs for you to be clear and precise about your vision. The fun part is communicating your hopes and ideas, checking out materials and fabrics and then exploring new options. Just remember that this can be a big financial commitment, so in-depth research is key to get the desired result and to create a harmonious working process throughout your property’s interior upgrade.

 

Do you remember the time “faux” plants looked…fake?

Nowadays, with advancements in manufacturing techniques and new materials, it’s often easy to mistake artificial plants for the real thing!

But when did the use of faux plants actually become part of home and commercial life? And what exactly are their origins?

Back in Time

No one can quite pin down the exact timeframe of artificial/faux plants inception. However, they can be traced as far back as the Egyptian and Roman era. The materials used back then would have been radically different, but the art and ingenuity of production were just as intricate as the designs that you see today. Floral wreaths were made using thin stained plates of animal horn. Materials such as copper, silver and gilt were also utilised to represent flora and fauna when deemed symbolic or appropriate. 

It is fitting that China is a major producer of faux plants. According to historians, this was where they originated from. Although early artificial designs were somewhat crude —  using twisted ribbon and wire — the Chinese then went on to harness the use of silk in their productions to add an unrivalled flourish at the time. The mini-masterpieces were only enjoyed by the privileged few who could afford such artisan wares.

Often, the ladies of the Imperial Family ordered them to be worn in their hair. The trend spread beyond the confines of the palace walls, influencing the masses who were desperate to emulate their social superiors.

Origins of the Artificial Plant

Moving Ahead

With each century came more developments and from many of them in Europe. Over in 12th Century Italy, various groups of Artisans begin crafting unique and eye-catching faux flowers using silkworm cocoons. 

Then — in the 15th Century — the French began crafting their own faux-fauna and surpassed the workmanship of their other European rivals. After the French Revolution, some of these Artisans fled to Britain and found a gaggle of wealthy patrons eager to purchase their wares.

The Victorian era was another benchmark for faux-fauna. Dazzling and opulent arrangements were made using a combination of both fresh and faux flowers. Whilst still utilising silk, other materials (crepe, velvet and muslin etc) were also brought in to embellish the ever-expanding range of designs.

Florists in the 1920’s used faux-fauna to supplement fresh arrangements. When certain flowers were out of season,  this was a great way to meet demand.

Silk - Origins of the Artificial Plant

Present Day Faux

With modern-day production techniques, we’re now in the enviable position of being able to create a sophisticated product that offers durability and long life whilst emulating live fauna.

The future journey of artificial plant and flower production is likely to mirror its illustrious past. Especially as it allows people to be enveloped by a beautiful representation from nature — without the hassle of constant upkeep.

What’s not to like?

It won’t come as much of a surprise that the wedding design industry is big business and least of all in the floral department. In fact, the wedding service industry was estimated to be worth at least £10 billion last year and that was in the UK alone.

According to various sources, the average newly-engaged couple will be looking to spend about 8-10% of their nuptials budget on floral arrangements for their big day. A hefty chunk when you consider all the expenditures that go into planning the wedding as a whole.

Flowers are always going to be an essential detail for any wedding design, but they don’t necessarily have to be real to create an everlasting impression.

7 Pros of Using Artificial Flowers in Wedding Designs

  1. They are hardy! No more wilting and shrivelling – especially during the heat of summer when so many weddings take place. In fact, they’re ready to go from the initial ordering process to the time of the big day itself.
  2. Artificial flowers also tend to be a lot lighter. This also applies to the various centrepieces as they won’t need a water source. This is important when it comes to transportation and hanging installations in the venue space. No water source = no water splash = one less thing to worry about! 
  3. Takes the stress away! You don’t have to order the flowers to arrive last minute so they are as fresh as possible or worry about them turning up on time. Artificial flowers can be ordered way in advance and then be lightly dusted and adjusted before they are actually needed. Also, if you are arranging them yourself this gives you plenty of time to play around with arrangements without having to constantly keep buying fresh ones.
  4. Allergies! If there are concerns that a wedding guest may sneeze through the ceremony or start sputtering through the speeches then this may be a good way to eliminate the fear of a sudden pollen attack ruining everyone’s day.
  5. The couple gets to keep them forever! This element of a couple’s special day will be frozen in time if that’s their wish. 
  6. Once their primary use is complete, the wedding display can then double up as a great gift of thanks to the bridal party.
  7. You don’t have to wait for the right season for a particular flower to appear! It’s the couple’s big day so their choices are widened by going down the artificial route.

Here are some great faux wedding design ideas:

Table setting 

Secret Garden – Peony Garland

Outdoor wedding 

Wisteria Tree 300cm     

Grand entrance 

Modern Eclectic – Amaryllis

Although you may not have the smell of fresh flowers, the versatility that faux-flora and fauna have to offer quashes any worries on that front. This is all about getting maximum impact with a minimum amount of stress and disruption. Plus, it’s about creating a lasting reminder of a beautiful day.

Could you or any of your employees benefit from great outdoor space at work?

In today’s working environment, the economic pressures are high and the demands to succeed are intense. It’s no wonder lunch breaks are slowly becoming a thing of the past for many and adding to stress levels.

Space for employees to remove themselves from staring at their screens and recharge for a moment equals smart business thinking. A breath of fresh air feels like the best thing in the world if you’re bogged down by work. It delivers that much-needed energy boost and clarity of mind – which in turn leads to a more productive workplace.

According to a poll undertaken by hospitality specialist Sodexo and the nonprofit health body Ukactive, 800 British workers they surveyed only took an average of 22 minutes for their lunch breaks.

How employees can benefit 

Taking a short break every couple of hours from a tough work schedule helps employees keep in good shape physically, mentally and emotionally, considerably improving productivity.

Spending as little as 20 minutes a day outside can:

  • reduce stress
  • improve memory and concentration
  • restore mental energy 
  • encourage team building
  • improve social interaction

How to Create an Outdoor Office Space

  1. Plants, plants and more plants

    Fill the space with (you guessed it) … plants. As a business, things can get busy and stressful at times, so the last thing you may be thinking about is tending to green spaces and making sure it looks luscious all year round. Try a low maintenance version of a botanical garden by opting for artificial plants. You can still mix in live plants for the extra wow factor. Grow herbs or vegetables. Or, plant flowers and grasses and create a space that attracts butterflies and pollinators.
  2. Seating

    If you really want to entice employees into using the outdoor space, provide comfortable seating where they can enjoy lunch, take a moment to themselves or even have a catch up with colleagues. 
  3. Walking Trails

    For larger spaces with land. A walking trail would be a great way to get out, take in some fresh air and get some vitamin D. For an extra endorphin boost,  this could be a great time of the day for a run or team walk.
  4. Outdoor Grilling Station

    If you really want to splash out, how about a grilling station? This would make a fabulous way for the team to get together on a Friday afternoon.

With the pressures placed on today’s workforce, it is important to remember that employees need to detach from their screens and take those all-important regular breaks.   

Giving employees an opportunity to untether themselves from technology is one more step on the ladder to staff retainment and loyalty.

Open your hotel to remote workers and reap the benefits

The number of remote workers is increasing. The Office of National Statistics predicts that 50% of UK employees will be remotely working to some degree by 2020. London alone already has more than a million people who regularly work from cafes, restaurants and other public spaces. D&D London is catering to the coworking market when it opens five of their restaurants to remote workers in June.

As the number of remote workers increases so too does demand for quality remote workspaces. A Guestline survey states that 1 in 4 remote workers feel there aren’t enough hotels that cater to the remote working market.

So, how can your hospitality business benefit from this shift in how we work and encourage digital nomads into your premises?

What is remote working?

A remote worker is someone who works outside a traditional office environment or in a different location to their employer/client.

Remote workers include freelancers and the self-employed who may not have dedicated business premises other than their home. But also includes employed staff who can choose to “work from home” either full-time or part-time aka a remote employee.

Why is remote working increasing?

Being able to work remotely has been empowered by both technology and attitude. Laptops, mobile devices and wifi have given workers the freedom to move away from a desk and therefore also out of the office. Cloud technology allows access to central information from anywhere. Plus video calling and collaboration software such as Slack negates the need for face-to-face communication.

The types of roles have also changed with an increase in tech- or service-orientated jobs. Plus there’s been a cultural shift in our understanding the importance of a good work/life balance that has helped facilitate the shift towards remote working.

What remote workspaces do remote workers choose to work from?

Remote workers are resourceful and creative in where they choose to work:

  • Work from home: not everyone has a study or home office so this can often be on the sofa, at the kitchen table or even in bed.
  • Use a coworking office: remote workers can hire deskspace in a shared office that includes shared office equipment plus other people to chat or network with.
  • Coffee shops and libraries: many public spaces offer free wifi to their patrons. Coffee shops also offer refreshments whereas libraries offer peace and quiet.
  • Your hotel lobby or restaurant: hospitality businesses are beginning to tap into the remote worker market. Read on to find out more.

Remote workers workspace

Remote worker finds a quiet spot to work.

What are the benefits of remote working?

The benefits to the worker and their employee are significant:

  • Workers have a better work/life balance
  • Environment benefits from less commuting and travel
  • Remote working means happier and less stressed employees
  • Remote workers are outperforming office workers with increases in productivity
  • Cost savings for the employer in operating overheads including needing smaller offices.

Is coworking and remote working the same thing?

Not always. A coworking space, where individuals can rent a desk or office space to suit their needs, could be viewed as a regular or traditional place of work – it’s still an office after all. Freelancers and self-employed people are more likely to use a coworking space than a remote employee.

The shared amenities and opportunities to meet and chat with other workers are much like a typical office with similar distractions of the open plan office. However, not all coworking spaces are equal. The rise of the remote worker has also led to the rise in the choice of coworker spaces.

Benefits of opening your hotel to remote workers

Many hotels and restaurants struggle to fill their premises during the day. Tapping into the remote worker market can help boost many aspects of your hospitality business:

  • Increase footfall during quieter times of the day
  • Existing guests will benefit from the workspaces too
  • Encourages contractors and business travellers to your hotel
  • Brings new people into your business who may not have otherwise visited
  • Promotes the use of your function rooms for business purposes
  • Creates a vibrant ambience: your establishment is a popular venue!
  • More sales of beverages, snacks and lunches. How about a remote worker “lunchtime special”?
  • Benefit from word of mouth recommendations.

empty hotel lobby remote workers

An empty lobby during the day isn’t earning you anything.

How to encourage remote workers into your business

Wifi and Connectivity

The biggest factor that will attract remote workers into your lobby is the quality of the internet connection. It needs to be fast, reliable and secure. Show that you welcome remote workers by displaying the information about your free wifi and how to connect to it.

Ambient noise levels

Most remote workers will opt for a quieter workspace (but there are those who thrive in busier environments). So, ambient and background noise is acceptable whereas loud voices are less desirable. Consider how close the coworking space is to the kitchen, front desk, toilets or other areas that are noisier and busier.

Comfort

Your hotel lobby or lounge is probably already a comfortable space. Think about keeping seating in smaller groups and add side or coffee tables. Natural light is best but bear in mind that harsh lighting can increase screen glare.

Privacy

Feeling you have your own space within which to work is true for remote workers as much as it for those confined to a traditional office desk. A sense of workspace privacy is vital:

  • Use plants as room dividers and screens to create privacy.
  • Experiment with different seating and table heights to define zones and options for the remote worker.
  • Create smaller working spaces and a larger meeting room area with your furniture layouts.
  • Keep furniture lower level if you’re tight on space to create a better feeling of space.

Facilities

Are you able to offer device charging facilities or provide access to a printer? Some devices are power hungry so access to sockets is likely to be a dealbreaker for most remote workers. Consider offering free tea, coffee and water as well.

Free vs Paid Coworking space

If you’re are considering a paid coworking space you’ll need to ensure you can consistently offer all of the above. So the decision to offer a rentable space will depend on how much space you can dedicate to coworking. Plus both your location and existing infrastructure. If you’re not in an area of higher-demand – such as a city or large town – then you might not attract enough remote workers to make it viable.

The benefits listed above still apply to a free remote workspace. If encouraging remote workers into your premises helps your business feel vibrant and sells a few more covers and coffees each day, then what do you have to lose?


Floresy is a supplier of artificial plants and trees to hotels, restaurants and commercial businesses in London and across the UK.

Wellness tourism is booming. But you don’t have to be a health spa to take advantage of this trend in travellers. Here are some ideas that any hotel can implement to help appeal to the wellness tourist:

Promote good sleep

As a hotelier, you know that getting a good night’s sleep is a key factor in getting a good review and seeing repeat business. Whilst you may already be proud of the quality of your bedrooms, are you using it in your marketing?

Getting good sleep is paramount to health and wellbeing just as getting exercise and eating a balanced diet. So, go the extra step and help achieve a high sleep quality for your customers:

  • Help your guests avoid caffeine and alcohol before bedtime. A fruit and oat smoothie is a better option than a nightcap as the oats and dairy contain sleep-inducing compounds. 
  • Blackout curtains and/or eyemasks will help eliminate unwanted light
  • With people coming and going, it isn’t always easy to reduce noise levels, especially in urban areas. So how about complimentary ear plugs for all your guests?
  • Give your guests the option of no TV in their room.

You can help set the mood from the very moment your guests arrive and create a relaxed lobby. The use of plants and greenery to bring your guests closer to nature will have a beneficial effect. 

Review your menu

One of the best things about staying in a hotel is someone else does the cooking (and the washing up). For many travellers, this is an opportunity to indulge. However, for a wellness hotel, this may be an opportunity to indulge your guests in healthier options as well: 

  • Ensure you offer healthy, balanced meal options on your menu.
  • Consider including calorie information. This helps your wellness guest make informed choices about when they indulge.
  • Local and organic produce has long been a staple for many hoteliers and is a must for a wellness hotel. To push this further, you could include information about the local producers such as the ethics behind their business.
  • Include more plant-based choices on your menus – and make them accessible. How about an indulgent (and not particularly healthy) vegetarian main course? Better for the planet but also good for the soul. Avoid treating gluten-free or vegan options as afterthoughts. 

Find out about wellness activities in your area

What is there to do near you that would appeal to a wellness traveller? Activities or experiences that will help relax or enlighten are perfect and why not try them out yourself first so you can give informed advice. Show your prospective guests there are lots to choose from near your hotel. It also helps create a stress-free experience when you’ve done the legwork. Activities to consider include:

  • Yoga, meditation or alternative therapies.
  • Walking groups or maps for local walking routes or sightseeing tours
  • Expressive and creative activities such as drawing or painting classes, craft experiences like weaving or woodworking.

You can also bring the activities to your guests and organise events in your hotel.

Dare to drop the WiFi?

Whilst ditching guest WiFi altogether might be a bit drastic, how about a technology-free zone somewhere in your hotel. No phones, tablets or laptops allowed. This helps create a relaxing and stress-free zone for travellers looking to escape.

Got gym facilities? Promote them.

Whilst fitness is probably secondary to relaxation, exercise and mental health are closely connected. And a hotel gym is a great asset so make sure your guests know about. However, perhaps consider the choice of words when promoting your gym. To attract a wellness traveller, its often more about de-stressing and being active than it is about working out or getting ‘pumped’.

If you don’t have gym facilities, is there a local gym that offers day passes? How about the optional extra for guests to have an exercise bike or a yoga mat in their room for the duration of their stay? Make sure you have a solution for the physically active wellness tourist.

What to take away for your Wellness Hotel

Wellness isn’t all about exercise and healthy eating. It’s a holistic approach to looking after the mind and body. So take a step back and think about what really makes people feel happy and healthy and implement that in your business.

Floresy can help set the mood with some well-chosen artificial plants and trees. Our products are low-maintenance, realistic and perfect for your wellness hotel vibe.