Inspiration from the world of interior design and how Floresy products can recreate the look.

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How a lack of privacy is killing open plan office productivity

Does an office without boundaries create division among workers?

An open-plan office should be a collaborative space, right? A place where workers interact and communicate without hindrance by boundaries such as cubical walls and room dividers. But despite this seemingly obvious statement, the opposite is truer. Open plan office productivity from collaboration is a myth.

A recent study looked at the impact of ‘open’ workspaces on human collaboration. It found that the amount of face-to-face communication dropped by 70% while electronic communication increased by up to 50%.

How was collaboration measured?

Researchers followed two firms during a planned layout change from a cubicle-dominated office to an open plan style. Both firms were Fortune 500 multi-nationals who were about to redesign an office at their head office. The researchers recorded the employee’s behaviours before and after the layout change.

Prior studies looking to measure productivity and collaboration in the workplace have relied upon surveys and activity logging by the workers. This study, by Ethan S. Bernstein and Stephen Turban of Havard University, instead employed a wearable tech device or ‘sociometric badge’.

wearable tech measures open plan office productivity

Sociometric badge measures collaboration in the open-plan office

The badge recorded their face-to-face interactions. The devices worked when they came in close proximity to another badge i.e. when the participants were interacting. The aim of the device was to capture a great deal of data:

  • An infrared sensor captured whom they were facing
  • A microphone captured whether they were talking or listening (without recording what was said for privacy).
  • A movement sensor captured body movement and posture
  • Plus a Bluetooth sensor to record their location within the office

The first study had 52 participants (about 40% of the total workers) and monitored them for 15 working days before the transition. The study used a settling-in period of two months to allow for the changes to become embedded. The monitoring of the participants then continued for another 15 days within their new office environment.

A second study further tested the results from the first study. One hundred employees (roughly 45%) agreed to participate and were monitored using the badges.

This time, monitoring of the participants lasted for eight weeks prior to the redesign and eight weeks after the move. This second study also included the two-month settling-in period.

 

What were the open plan office productivity results?

Both studies saw a fall in face-to-face communication decrease of around 70%. Email and messaging went up by between 20% to 50% and accounts for some of that lost interaction. 

It seems that, when working within an open-plan setting, workers would seek to create their own “privacy” by isolating themselves. For example, people wear large headphones to appear busy. Or they choose to use electronic communication forms instead.

There is a basic human desire for privacy. Evidence supports that acting on that desire can help productivity. In other words, we don’t like feeling observed. This study also touches on how ‘collective intelligence’ works. It’s a new concept but there could be an optimum amount of stimulation that promotes higher levels of this type of ‘hive-mind’ intelligence. And open-place offices may be too stimulating.

The study sums up the findings “In short… open architecture appeared to trigger a natural human response to socially withdraw from officemates…”

How to use plants to create more privacy in your workplace

It seems that the best office layouts include a variety of different working spaces. Here are some ideas to easily adapt an existing workspace for better open plan office productivity:

  • Avoid desks where the worker’s back faces a walkway or corridor. It makes employees feel on-show plus its bad Feng Shui.
  • Read our blog on how to use plants are room dividers.
  • Include comfortable seating areas without any desks that promote conversation.
  • Take advantage of the open-plan design to create collaborative areas away from people’s desks.
  • Create privacy screens from office dividers or plants such as bamboo to help workers feel more enclosed.
  • Make sure any open-plan areas aren’t overfilled with desks. Respect your employee’s sense of personal space.
  • Always include private working stations or pods that allow employees to focus on work undisturbed.

Floresy is always ready to help solve any office layout dilemmas using our years of experience with commercial interiors. 

 

Why do our brains like high ceilings?

High ceilings are a highly desirable architectural feature. But why? And what’s so bad about normal ceiling heights?

We like high ceilings because of their association with grand interiors or properties from certain periods, such as houses from the Georgian era. Walking into a hotel lobby with lofty ceilings will add anticipation of just how luxury your guest experience will be. And a cathedral’s vaulted ceiling will raise your eyes, and thoughts, to heaven.

But likewise, high ceilings can make a room feel cold or empty. The room may lack warmth or make you feel uncomfortable and exposed. A large foyer in an office building can feel intimidating or clinical. Or maybe the room just lacks the appropriate proportions to warrant a high ceiling and therefore feels ‘wrong’.

There have been several studies that have looked at our relationship with ceilings height. One suggests that we find high ceilings more beautiful because we associate them with freedom. Whereas lower ceilings seem to stimulate better decision making perhaps in response to feeling confined and in need of an exit strategy.

This is all because of a concept called ‘priming‘ which activates different thought-processing in the brain. In other words, ceiling height can change how we think.

The upshot of this information is that both high ceilings and ceilings of a normal height can be beneficial to a workplace or retailer, depending on how you want to workers or customers to behave.

Use ceiling height to create different working environments or to influence how we want our customers to behave.

Hotels may want to promote a sense of freedom and escapism for their customers, with high ceilings inspiring the possibilities of their stay. Retailers may also want their customers to feel inspired but would a more typical ceiling height encourage decision making and lead to a purchase better?

An ideal office environment would offer different spaces for when a worker needs to be creative and expansive in their thinking, perhaps problem-solving with colleagues. But when that report’s deadline is looming, getting your head down in a lower-ceiling environment could help improve focus.

How to make your ceiling look higher

  • Draw the eye to the highest point by hanging curtains/blinds at the top of the wall, not just the top of the window.
  • Choose furniture with a low profile. Avoid high back sofas and chairs. Low-profile will create a greater expanse of space between the top of the furniture and the ceiling. Conversely, you can include high profile pieces such as a tall shelving unit. This contrast of height with your low profile seating will also create a similar sense of expansive space.
  • Paint your ceiling the same colour as the walls. Lighter colours work better but so do gloss paints as they will reflect the light making the ceiling feel higher.
  • Avoid clutter and overfilling a room as this detracts from the sense of space.

How to make your ceiling look lower

  • Use darker colours on the ceiling. If you combine this with a picture rail at you desired ceiling height, paint the walls the same colour as the ceiling down to this rail.
  • Hang suspended lighting at lower heights to bring the focus down from the ceiling height. You can use this same trick with hanging/trailing plants.
  • Bigger furniture will fill a room with a high ceiling and give a better sense of scale.

Plants are a great way to emphasise an area that you want to draw focus to. You can use tall plants to raise the eye-line or to create contrast with low-profile furniture. Wall-mounted displays can also define the height of a room and hanging plants can be used to create a floating ceiling at whatever height you wish. Floor-standing pots with bushy foliage are a great way to keep the focus lower.

Floresy offers exciting solutions to your interior needs. Get in touch today.

 

 

5 myths about artificial plants – busted!

We bust 5 common myths about artificial plants. Think artificial plants are fake and tacky? Think again…

Artificial plants look fake

There was a time when fake plants did look fake, it’s true. But that was when they were only found next to a bowl of stale potpourri in the ladies toilets of some shady 1970’s pub. The materials used in modern artificial flowers are far more sophisticated. Most leaves and petals are created using a polyester blend but silk is also used. Polyester fibres can be woven to create soft, textured surfaces that can even fool the touch-test.

Have you seen a Gerbera? The first time I saw a cut flower Gerbera, I thought it was fake. It wasn’t. I couldn’t believe it was real. But these days, I can’t believe artificial plants are fake.

Artificial plants are bad feng shui

The ancient Chinese discipline of interior design centres around the flow of energy through buildings. It’s about achieving a balance of masculine and feminine aspects but also elements such as air and water. You can go as mystical as you like with it but Feng Shui has many underlying principles that just make good design sense.

Because of it’s connection to the natural world, you might think that Feng Shui would reject artificial plants because, well, they’re fake. But many designers actually argue to the contrary. A dead, real plant is seriously bad feng shui. That dried up specimen is going to suck the chi right out of your room.

So if you’re a serial plant killer or if you have an area where maintenance of a real plant would be an issue, artificial plants make great feng shui sense.

Artificial plants are tacky

Maybe the ultimate “tacky” artificial plants are, in fact, the well-loved artificial Christmas tree. Year on year, we get these artificial plants out from storage and display them proudly in our homes and businesses. Why do we love them? Well, they don’t drop their needles, they don’t pose an allergy hazard and no real trees are sacrificed instead.

But an artificial plant that stands like a sentinel in an office or hotel lobby isn’t tacky: it’s stoic. The screen of bamboo that gives privacy to a seating area isn’t tacky: it’s reassuring. And a cheerful hyacinth that greets you as approach a reception desk isn’t tacky: it’s welcoming.

Artificial plants are not as good as real plants

This depends on why you are using plants. If you want to purify the air in your office, artificial plants aren’t as good as real ones (duh). But if you want to add lots of greenery for the mental wellbeing of your staff or visitors without the maintenance overhead, artificial plants aren’t just as good, they are better than real plants.

The best solution is usually a combination of both. Use the artificial where maintenance may be awkward, where the light levels are too low or where the central heating is too high. And add as many real plants as your maintenance plan will allow.

Artificial plants are expensive

One of the odd myths about artificial plants is that they are expensive. As with anything you can spend as much or as little on a product. And you usually get what you pay for. The main difference between buying an artificial plant and a real one is longevity. The artificial plant will remain the same size and in the same, prime condition. In other words, after you got what you paid for, you’ll get it to keep it for longer than a real plant.

If you’re a business looking for a plant maintenance package, consider reading this post on the comparative costs or renting and buying plants first.

Artificial plants represent an investment in your interiors whether you spend £5 or £500.

Most myths about artificial plants are really about personal preference. At Floresy, we know we produce the best range of high-quality artificial plants and trees on the market. Our products are firmly rooted in reality so we’re confident that they will bust any myth thrown at them.

Add a new dimension with trailing plants

Trailing plants are a great solution for adding greenery when space is a premium. Most plants can be suspended in hanging baskets or placed on a shelf such as the herbs and succulents featured in Floresy’s collaboration at Aneto Deli. But for a more wild, botanical look, why not try a trailing plant instead? Trailing plants will bring a softness – or even some wildness – to your interior decor.

trailing plants hanging from ceiling in a scandi bedroom

Trailing plants can be is displayed in the smallest of spaces whist not taking up valuable floor space.

A trailing plant hanging from the ceiling will emphasise the height of a ceiling. Also, placing a trailing plant on a high shelf will likewise emphasise the expanse of a wall. Conversely, where the ceiling height is disproportionate to the size of the room an array of trailing plants will lower the effective height of a ceiling. This eatery – Hammer & Tong 412 in Melbourne – does just that to create a more intermate setting.

Ceiling hanging trailing plants

Hammer & Tong 412 in Melbourne uses hanging vines to create a more intimate atmosphere.

How to display trailing plants

Hanging baskets

Long before living walls, there were hanging baskets. For the classic cottage garden look, it is hard to beat a traditional basket stuffed full of colourful flowers such as fuschias and lobelias. Perfect for an English pub garden.

trailing fuchsia in a hanging basket

An unashamed display of trailing fuchsia in a hanging basket. Photo: Pinterest

For indoors, a retro revival is the macrame or crochet hanging basket such as this plant hanger from Modern Macrame. Slip the potted plant inside the knotted rope hanger –  make sure the pot is attractive too. Most hangers of this style allow two or three plants to be stacked on top of each other and even small or low-level plants can be used to add height to an interior scheme.

Macrame plant hanger for trailing plants

Even small plants can add height using a plant hanger.

Trailing plants on shelves

Shelves will allow you to show the length of any trailing plant off to its maximum effect. In this display, the long, graceful plants balance the boxiness of the small display shelves. The trailing leaves break up the structured lines of the boxes. The images of the still life and green bird all contribute to the botanical theme.

Trailing plants on display box shelves artificial plants

Trailing plants on display box shelves

Here, the Hotel Armour use a dense display of trailing and upright plants to create a rich and vibrant look. The trailing leaves from one shelf spill over the plants on the shelf below. The display uses only a few varieties of plants and only foliage to slightly tame this otherwise wild look.

 

Trailing plants as living wall artificial plants

Hotel Amour creates their take on a living wall using selves and trailing plants. Photo by LostNCheeseland on Flickr

Window boxes

 

 

Trailing plants in a window box

Trailing plants in an old-school window box

Get the look with Floresy products

Floresy stock a wide selection of plants suitable for creating a hanging display. Products, such as this Ivy or Hedera, is a great choice for a more traditional theme and can be used inside or outside. Floresy makes ivy in two leaf styles – this long green 130cm product as shown below – or a white/green variegated leaf ivy.

long green ivy artificial plant trailing plant by Floresy

Artificial long green trailing ivy 130cm by Floresy

Succulents are very on trend. Try smaller plants in a hanging display such as these succulents in dark grey pots. These would work well in a contemporary or understated interior theme because of their neutral asthetic.

artificial succulents mix in dark grey pot

Artificial succulent mix in contemporary dark grey pots

A popular choice of trailing plant to display on a shelf is this variety of succulent. The Schlumbergera Truncata Floresy plant product comes in white ceramic pots and is the perfect length to add to an existing shelf because it isn’t too long. They will look great as a display at a reception desk area.  

succulent in ceramic pot cactus artificial

Succulent in ceramic pot cactus

 

This trailing succulent is known as the ‘fishhook’ plant or banana vine however its Latin name is Senecio radicans. Its tangle of leaves works well in any botanical theme whereas its length is perfect for display on a shelf or suspended.

Artificial succulent plant trailing plant banana vine

Artificial succulent fishhook or banana vine by Floresy

 

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6 Hotel room design mistakes to avoid

A hotel room has to work hard. It has to offer good looks, comfort, practicality and a home-from-home for your guests. Whilst at the same time be cost-effective to maintain in order to earn its keep. But when it comes to striking a balance between form and function, there are common design mistakes that any hotel room can fall foul of.

1. Bad lighting

Few of us still sleep with the lights on but bad lighting can seriously cast a shadow on your guest experience. Rooms benefit from multiple light sources that allow guests to change the overall brightness to meet their own preferences. And controlling the lighting needs to be at your guest’s convenience too. Make sure the bedside lamps aren’t too bright and that the controls can be easily reached from the bed. And completely ditch any fluorescent lights – they were ever not a design mistake?

Hotel room with only one bedside table and light

Only one bedside table and light – but what about the guest sleeping on the left?

2. Bold colours that are not restful

It’s great to be able to make a design statement in a room, especially using colours that are on trend. But overuse of bright, powerful colours will not help your guests get a restful night’s sleep. If your chosen theme colour is bright or bold, use it sparingly. Consider using it in throw cushions, lampshade and in wall art. Also, you could choose a patterned curtain fabric that includes the colour in smaller amounts.

Red hotel bedroom accent

Ham Yard Hotel in London uses a very stimulating red but as an accent colour.

3. Oversized furniture or too much furniture

We’ve all been there. Bought that amazing super-king bed that we saw in the store and now you can’t open your wardrobe doors. Even generously sized rooms will feel cramped if they are full of furniture. Floor space is key. For smaller bedrooms, consider a smaller double bed. Alternatively, make each item of furniture earn its keep by having more than one function. For example, a bedside that is also a desk or a dressing table that is also a TV stand. If something can be wall-mounted do so, it frees up the floor giving a greater sense of space.

Clear surfaces and floor area creates space

So many great space-saving ideas such as the long wall shelf keep floor space and surface’s clear. Image from domino.com

4. Lack of technology

You’ve installed free wifi throughout your hotel and you’re patting yourself on the back. If technology was a guest room – you’ve just added the bed. Today’s travellers – especially millennials – expect more than access to wifi which is now considered a necessity. A common hotel room design mistake is insufficient charging sockets as multiple devices may need to be plugged-in simultaneously. With the number of connectable devices growing from two billion in 2006 to a predicted 200 billion by 2020, hotels cannot afford to not invest in greater room technology. Hotel apps that allow personalisation of temperature, lighting and interaction with other hotel’s facilities are fast becoming must-have hotel tech. The Marriott City Centre hotel knows how to do it.

Hotel room design mistakes with technology don't happen at Marriott

Marriott City Centre hotel in Charlotte, USA is an industry-leader for hotel tech. Rooms include Bluetooth connectivity for TV plus room key apps.

5. Clutter

When a guest comes to stay with you, they need to feel welcomed and accommodated. Part of that comes from having somewhere to put their belongings. Clear surfaces are more inviting and tell the guest that room is theirs to use. It might only be a phone and a toothbrush. But if the room is full of brochures, tea & coffee making facilities, lamps and potted plants, the result is a feeling of being unwanted. And that’s a big design mistake.

Radisson Blu Hotel Room

No design mistakes at the Radisson Blu in Schipol: subdued colour scheme with a bold accent, multiple light sources and all those clear surfaces… Design & images property of Creneau International

6. Looks over comfort

Achieving the wow-factor with hotel room design is what we want. It creates a memorable stay for your guests and really enhances their customer experience. However, if that fabulous-looking armchair is so low to the ground that it’s uncomfortable to sit on, what is it for? The fifteen throw cushions on the bed look sumptuous and inviting. But how practical is it for your guests to have to shove them off the bed to lie down. Not to mention the laundry bill! The panel curtains are in an exquisite print but don’t completely cover the window. The wow-factor will lose its value if the bedroom simply does not perform to the same expectation as the looks suggest. These are over-design mistakes. A trend rising alongside the millennial market is for simpler room design. Comfort without fuss.

Simple hotel room design

At the end of the day, it’s all about the bed.

Let Floresy contribute to your good hotel room design with our floral design service.

Amazing Designs using Interior Trees

The last place you expect to find a tree is indoors. Except of course in stunning interiors! A design that incorporates interior trees will make their guests feel welcome and ever-so-special. The addition of an interior tree will have the wow-factor for the very reasons that they are an unexpected addition to a room. Lavish botanicals will create an atmosphere completely different from the street or climate outside. Use them to set a room apart from the rest of a hotel, restaurant or bar by defining a room’s specific and unique character.

 

Interior Tree Designs

Light bright interior tree design

A light and fresh appeal in contrast to the dark and moody bar area.

Large stone planters on plinths add even greater height to these trees in the Ugly Duckling, Melbourne. The result is a light, bright and fresh feel to the restaurant – a stark comparison to the oak and dark blues of the proceeding bar area (not pictured).

Silver birch interior trees

Ethos uses silver birch trees as a design focal point

Ethos restaurant in London uses silver birch tree trunks to create this amazing interior. The unique bark of the trees echoes the marble table tops. The overall design gives an organic and bountiful-nature aspect that reflects the quality of the produce used on this vegetarian restaurant’s menu. 

Interior trees and decorations

A joyous combination of tree leaves and paper-chain ceiling decorations.

There are several interior trees in play at the Weranda Lunch & Wine restaurant in Pozna, Poland. Combine them with many plants, planters and table flowers plus the extraordinary paper-chain ceiling decorations and the result is magical.

 

Multiple plants and interior trees

Rich and warm interior of the Dishroom in Shoreditch

Whilst there are no actual trees in the Dishroom in Shoreditch, London, the lush ferns on tall plant stands are doing a grand job. The restaurant uses an eclectic mix of the dark-toned wooden furniture, leafy plants, and beige upholstery. Add the ropes-covered pillars, brick and bare plaster walls and the overall effect is kind of hipster-colonialism.

Interior Trees at night

Central interior tree design

Seating around the trunk allows you to site under the canopy.

The wonderfully-named Woolloomooloo Wharf hotel in Sydney has seating area constructed around one of its focal trees (plus compulsory kitsch pink flamingoes). The canopy has fairy lights decorating the branches making it a delightful space to sit and sip.

Interior trees with lights

1920s glamour at the refurbished Refuge in Manchester.

The Refuge, Manchester glamourous refurbishment includes a Winter Garden. Combining classy black and white tiles with a palette of soft greens, it has a decadent yet relaxed feel evocative of the 1920s. A great tip when adding an impressive interior tree is to also add lighting. The room can be transformed once more at night when the lighting is switched on.

Interior tree with lights

Who would have thought Disneyland could be classy?

The Starbucks at Disneyland demonstrates the lighted tree at night. Surprisingly stylish given its theme park location, a bench seat encircles the tree creating seating for multiple tables. Plus the fairy lights are certainly worthy of any Disney princess.

Artifical Tall Trees at Floresy

Floresy offers a bespoke design service for larger-scale artificial trees. Whether it’s oak, acacia or baobab, each tree is custom-made to the customer’s specifications. Suitable for indoor or outdoor use, our trees are durable, weather-proof and fully protected against UV fading and damage.

Faux Artificial interior tree

Floresy artificial trees are custom built to match your requirements

Each tree can be built to match very specific requirements. They can have an exact height, canopy size or even an unusual shape to frame an architectural feature such as a door or window. And once installed they require no additional maintenance and will look fabulous all year round. Our design team are here to help create you the perfect tree.

To speak to one of our design consultants, please call 0208 0770891 or fill out the contact form on our Artificial Tall Tree page.

 

Define doorways using this simple design trick

First impressions really do count when your business relies on attracting customers from the street – whether you are a retailer or in the hospitality trade. So the most important area of business premises is, therefore, the doorway. In one cursory glance from a passer-by, you need to be able to communicate what your business is and who your clients are.

A very popular technique for defining the entrance to your premises is to use a pair of trees or plants. Placing the plants in matching containers either side of the door or porch will demark and frame the doorway. Whether you use boxwood or olive or whether it’s a standard or a natural shape, it’s a quick and easy to achieve a polished look.

Traditional and formal doorways

Nothing creates a traditional, elegant and refined look to an entranceway like a topiary of classic clipped boxwood. Symmetry is important with any formal look. These plain grey planters, neat box and black door make an imposing and professional entranceway.

It is not an inviting look. It suggests authority and power and that only a select few may enter. Perfect for a members-only club.

Formal Front Door with boxwood trees

Neat boxwood, grey planters and a big black door.

 

Executive hotels also want to appear exclusive but need a softer image to invite in the right kind of clientele. The Marignan Hotel in Paris uses these impressive planters to create a more contemporary look to this very formal entrance. Doubling up on the pairs of plants doubles the impact. And having a doorman is always impressive too.

Marignan Hotel Paris Entranceway

A very impressive facade at the Marignan in Paris

Modern and clean doorways

When you are a retailer, attracting customers in from the street is crucial to your success. Framing a doorway with symmetrical planting will give a sophisticated look but it also needs to be inviting. 

The Hudson Grace store in San Fransisco uses a classic-shaped topiary to frame the door whilst retaining a modern, clean look.

Classic contemporary topiary Doorway

Hudson Grace Shop Front Doorway with a classic yet contemporary topiary

This Dior shop front still conveys sophistication and refinery. However, the harsh formal look is softened by the addition of the pretty whites flowers and the wooden planters. The coordinating pale grey and white painted shop front echoes the tones of the wooden planters and flowers.

Dior Shop Front Doorway

The formal yet appealing image helps attract customers into your shop.

Warm and homely doorways

Humble Pie Whitby Doorway

Humble Pie shop in Whitby uses galvanised tin planters

So, the severity of this formal look is easily adapted to create a warm and inviting exterior. Combine the main tree or shrub with flowers. Change the planter for something informal. Humble Pie in Whitby (above) uses galvanised tin planters to decorate their shop front. Adapting the classic look by placing both trees central to the shop window, most likely due to space. Serena Lily’s home decor store uses re-purposed beer barrels as planters. This hotel in Province, Crillon le Brave, uses worn terracotta pots. The black and white shop front (photo by Mackenzie Horan) uses wooden containers in black to match the awning. The planting is softened by sweet little colourful flowers.

Standard Trees available at Floresy

Floresy design, make and sell a variety of trees perfect for use defining any doorway:

This classic long trunk olive at 210cm tall will add an instant wow factor to any premises entrance. Perfect on its own in an equally impressive container.

The Croton Artificial Tree has a unique appearance with a variegated leaf tinged with brown for a very natural look. It comes in two heights (150cm and 180cm) and would be great for a relaxed and tropical style restaurant.

The fabulous Ginkgo tree is 190cm and has an interesting leaf shape and a vibrant mid-green colour. It has a sunny feel and would be perfect for any cheerful and happy shop front.

One of Floresy’s many Ficus trees, this particularly bushy product is 120cm and would create a traditional topiary look, outside a hotel or office building.

 

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How to use plants as room dividers

Plants are a must-have accessory for any interior but their use need not be purely decorative. Large open plan spaces such as lobbies, offices and restaurants often need to define areas or zones. This may be waiting areas, eating areas or different teams in an office. Using plants as room dividers allow spaces to be kept light and open whilst still defining the boundary.

1. Pot Plants on Free Standing Shelves

Free standing shelves pot plants

insideout.com.au plants on free-standing shelves as room dividers

insideout.com.au use multiple smaller plants on a free-standing shelf unit to create this effective room divider. The combination of the boxy lines of the shelves with the lush and leafy plants creates a definite but soft divide that maximises the greenery on display.

Light can still travel through the shelves and the space remains open and welcoming. Tantalising glimpses of what is on the other side can be had through the gaps in the leaves. Yet the physicality of the shelves keeps the zones separate.

This principle works well in an office or a restaurant area where space needs to be distinct but still remain communal and social.

free-standing shelves with potted plants creates an airy room divide

Conclusion Office by DZAP free-standing shelves with potted plants creates an airy room divider

DZAP, Heerlen fluently demonstrates the same principle in this project for Conclusion Office (as featured on retaildesignblog.net). Here, the ratio of plant to shelf space is smaller granting an even greater sense of transparency. The seating area is defined but open and remains connected to the rest of the interior.

It’s a very versatile look: swap or combine the plants with ceramics or books to change the look from leafy and fresh to thoughtful and contemplative. This style, evocative of art galleries and libraries, would also suit an urban coffee house.

Get the look:

Combine open, free-standing shelving units with Floresy’s ferns in galvanised pots. Or if capitalising on the mystery beyond the barrier interests you, why not try these herbs in glass pots that allow even more light to pass through. 


2. Low divides for seated areas

Room dividers need not be high level. In an office, where everyone is typically seated, the divide can be kept lower. This maximises the sense of space and makes for easier quick conversations over the dividers promoting communication and collaboration among workers.

This also works well for waiting areas and lobbies. Clients are able to sit and relax whilst striking the right balance between feeling suitably private but not hidden (and likely to be forgotten or missed).

This display from idealhome.co.uk uses the same principle in a living space. But the same set-up would look at home in a trendy office environment (maybe even the shoes). Plus the use of cupboards also offers much-needed storage space adding practicality to ornamentation.

Low room divider with large leaf plants

Low room divider with large leaf plants also provides storage

In this Miami hotel lounge, designed by Meyer Davis, the use of plant room dividers in the seating area is subtle but effective. Sitting on the pristine white sofas, the delicate fronds of the ferns are just high enough to give privacy. But also low enough so as to not distract from the height of the featured, painted banyan tree trunks.

 

Meyer Davis designed hotel lounge

Hotel lounge uses low planting to offer seated privacy.

Get the look:

Floresy offers many choices of plants and trees that would look great as a low-level room divider. The bushy nature of these Schefflera plants is perfect for creating screens.

Choose a low-level container to place on the ground or a trough-style planter if positioning on top of low storage furniture.

Or why not go retro with these floor standing small bamboo trees? At 120cm and in an attractive pot they are tall enough to provide a screen when seated.

 


3. Use trees to create impact and atmosphere

Often the use of trees indoors is to create a central or focal point to a lobby or other large space. But here, the small and medium-sized trees create a seating zone, offer privacy and form an attractive feature. Clusters of palms of varying height and variety create a lavish and tropical screen in this hotel lobby at the EDITION hotel, Miami. The elegant white planters reflect the white marble floors and light coloured upholstery.

Trees in hotel lobby

Miami Beach Edition lobby creates impact and atmosphere using trees.

Broad-leafed trees at Sony Music Entertainment’s Amsterdam HQ create a secluded spot in the corner of their office. The palette of greens and soft turquoises in the furnishings and planters blend to create a peaceful sea-green oasis.

The room dividers here are less of a physical barrier and offer more of a screen. So move through the trees and enter the seclusion under the canopy of exotic leaves.

Broad leafed trees and plants offer seclusion in an open plan office

Broad-leafed trees and plants offer seclusion in an open plan office

 

Get the look:

This deluxe Kentia palm tree at 225cm adds an instant tropical yet relaxed feel to an interior. Also available in smaller sizes. The palm combines beautifully with the big, waxy leaves of the Alocasia Calidora. The generous leaf size lends itself to creating privacy. Finish the look with a selection of stylish containers from Floresy’s range of planters and pots.

Luxurious Artificial Plants

Interior Design with Luxurious Artificial Plants

Once upon a time, artificial plants were synonymous with cheap and tasteless style – a total no-go in any stylish home or office. But things have changed. Luxurious artificial plants and flower arrangements are now resident in the chicest of homes and office spaces and are on the wish-list of many a top interior designer. Thanks to the use of advanced materials and design methods, the fake plants of today almost indistinguishable from the real thing. Moreover, in the long run, they are much more economical both in terms of money and time.

Here at Floresy, we provide only the highest quality of luxurious artificial plants. All our products are, quite simply, beautiful, but in today’s post we will pick out some of our favourites from the collection.

We ask what are the different variations of luxury, and how can we create an atmosphere of opulence and abundance using artificial plants?

Jungle Fever

There’s no doubting that plants and flowers transform an interior. But if you keep your eye on design trends, you will notice that plants are everywhere. Interior designers are bringing the outdoors indoors. Luxurious urban homes are beginning to resemble an indoor jungle.

It seems that this urban-jungle theme is here to stay. Large-leaved, exotic plants are found littered all over the pages of interior design magazines. And, as winter approaches, our desire for tropical-style rooms will only get stronger. However, exotic plants require lots of care and sunlight. So for a low-maintenance solution for a busy lifestyle or a less-than-ideal environment, artificial counterparts are the perfect solution.

Zebras and Elephants

One of our all-time favourites is the gorgeous Alocasia Calidora or, as it’s affectionately known, ‘Elephant Ears’. With its luscious and vibrant green leaves, the Alocasia Calidora will liven up your living space no end.

artificial tree alocasia 120 cm

artificial alocasia calidora

Next is our fantastic selection of grasses. For instant height or to give a modern and contemporary feel, grasses are a great solution for your home or office. Our Zebra grasses come in a variety of sizes and are currently on Sale – snap one up now!

Zebra Grass high quality luxurious artificial plants

Artificial Zebra Grass

You needn’t wait until next summer to inject some warmth and colour into your home or office. All our products will provide year-round greenery. So brighten up your interiors regardless of the weather or season – you won’t regret it.

Orchids Orchids Everywhere

Both the Alocasia Calidora and the grasses are perfect for adding greenery to your space. But for additional colour and interest, how about adding flowers too? 

Orchids are rare and delicate plants that have a reputation for being difficult to care for. But this particular nature only adds to their association with beauty, opulence and wealth. Orchids have been admired and desired for centuries. From ancient tribal fertility rituals to the mantelpieces of the Victorian aristocracy, orchids are treasured all over the world.

Our artificial orchids are a firm favourite of our retail and hospitality clients. In restaurants and shops where natural light is scarce, our orchids are the perfect solution.

Below you can see an example of one of our displays of Phalaenopsis orchids (also known as moth orchids). These flowers are truly divine, and better yet, they are a perfect imitation of the real thing – it will take rather a lot of exploration before anyone can tell that they are actually luxorious artificial plants.

 

Luxurious artificial orchids

Luxurious artificial orchids are just like the real thing.

Artificial orchid arrangements in metal planters

Artificial orchid arrangements in metal planters

If it’s luxury with a hint of mystery that you’re after, it’s got to be orchids. You can find our Phalaenopsis orchids and other varieties over in our shop.

Bouquets Galore

Recently we’ve been working to create some bespoke flower bouquets for office buildings in London. First impressions count so creating a welcoming reception for any business is vital. However, keeping a constant supply of fresh flowers is a costly overhead. Worse still, a flower display that is past its best will have a detrimental effect on the impression you are trying to give. This is where Floresy comes in.

Our arrangements are the closest thing to real flowers that you can find. Your customers will be none the wiser. We can help you retain that luxurious feel at a fraction of the cost.

Exclusive Bespoke Service

In addition to our ready-made flower arrangements in our collection, we make most of our bouquets to order. This means that you can choose your favourite flowers and colours, and the shape of your arrangements. We can even work from a photograph to reproduce a live bouquet with artificial flowers. During production, we give our clients regular updates including photos of the products before they leave our workshop. This is so we ensure that your satisfaction will be guaranteed.

If you’re interested in our bespoke flower arranging service, give us a call today to discuss your requirements.

Luxurious Artificial Plants and Luxurious Services

Everyone has their own ideas about what luxury means to them. Here at Floresy all of our plants and flowers, regardless of their style, are luxurious. And on top of our products, our bespoke services are second to none. We go the extra mile to make sure you have exactly what you desire. So if floral dreams go beyond the scope of our catalogue, get in touch, because we can make them come true!

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Plant Pot Ideas

The entrance to your office, hotel or restaurant is an important showcase for your business. It communicates to passers-by – your potential customers – your brand, your style and even your niche.

When you have an avenue or approach to your premises, you have space and scope to display your style, taste and quality of your establishment. But when your entrance is direct from the street, making a definite statement about who you are can be more of a challenge.

A great solution to this problem is using plant pots to add character and definition to your entrance way.

Plant pot ideas

The range of plant pot styles, textures and colours are almost endless. Pots can add height to a display. They also offer convenience as they can be moved around and adapted to different styles and as the seasons change.

Metallic pots

Galvanised metal pots are tough, rust-resistant containers. Far from the shiny metallic look, this type of pot has a worn, aged and weathered look that would suit a period property. Conversely, this style of pot will also suit a venue with an industrial design.

Titanium zinc plant pot style ideas

Titanium zinc planters from outer-eden.co.uk are galvanised for rust-resistance.

Copper is on trend. When used as an outdoor plant pot, however, the copper will eventually succumb to the weather and turn green. Whilst this verdigris adds a wonderful patina to the copper, it won’t be the shiny, polished copper look that is so current. A good solution would be to use pots painted in a metallic copper paint instead or these copper plated galvanised pots from wayfair.com. 

Hammered Copper plant pot style ideas

Hammered copper-plated galvanised iron pots have a mid-sheen finish.

 

Stoneware and terracotta

Stone can be ancient, period, rustic or contemporary. It’s pretty much fully-weatherproof and will last a lifetime. But they are heavy and therefore not so easy to move. 

entrance to the hotel plant pot style ideas

These stone pots at the entrance to a hotel suit the age of the building whilst their clean lines remain contemporary.

Terracotta pots, however, are lighter in weight but need to be treated to be frost-hardy. They are also more porous than stone, metal or plastic pots meaning that the soil will dry out quicker and your plants will need more watering. Terracotta can be painted or glazed to add even more colour. 

terracotta plant pot ideas

Glazed pots add colour and can help reduce water-evaporation through the terracotta

 

If space is a real premium, this windowbox presentation of terracotta pots is a great solution. It adds character and colour without taking up any floor space. 

Window box plant pot ideas

A window box is the perfect space-saving solution. Consider using lightweight planters.

 

 

Plastic plant pot ideas

Plastic pots must be the go-to choice for any designer who needs a quick, cheap and all-round functional plant pot. Just like Floresy’s high-quality artificial plants that are near identical to the real thing, plastic pots can be indistinguishable from other materials. 

Metallic looking plastic pot

terracotta effect plastic plant pot ideas

Terracotta look plastic pot

wood-effect plastic plant pot ideas

Wood-effect plastic pot

 

 Pots with a difference

Imagine these planters outside a restaurant or bar. Even at the front of an office – what an impact! These planters are both a lighting and planting solution and show how a setting can be transformed at night time using light. A great option for a business that trades at both day and nighttime.

entrance to the hotel, office restaurant

Plant pot ideas – a plant pot that is also a light?

Of course, you are not limited to using a shop-bought, purpose-made planter of any kind. Match the planter to your business for instant humour and character. 

shoes as alternative plant pot ideas

A shoe shop?

Chest of drawers as a plant pot idea

For a furniture restored or second-hand furniture shop?

bicycle as alternative plant pot ideas

A bicycle shop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reusing something from your business is also a great cost-saving option. Be creative!

Artificial plants in pots

Whilst natural planting in pots require higher maintenance due to the amount of watering they require, planting in pots offers great flexibility. The solution to the watering problem is to use artificial plants. Another benefit of using artificial plants is that you can use them even if the light conditions are poor or your climate doesn’t suit your plant choice.

If you’d like any further inspiration on how to decorate the hotel entrance with the plant & pot decoration – contact us. Our passion and years of experience will enable us to create and implement any project. You can also find out more information about our artificial plants and flowers by going to Artificial Plants for Restaurants.