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Artificial Christmas product showcase

Christmas 2018 is nearly upon us, again, despite it only being a year since the last one. Let’s look at the artificial Christmas trees and plants that Floresy has to offer:

Poinsettia

Artificial Poinsettia Red White

Artificial Christmas Poinsettia Plants

The Poinsettia is a popular Christmas ‘flower’ prized for its deep green leaves and bright red bracts. The bracts aren’t true flowers but instead leaves that turn red (or orange, pink or white depending on the variety).

The plant is originally from Mexico where it also began its association with Christmas. Legend has it that a young girl too poor to buy a gift for Jesus’s birthday picked plants from the roadside instead. The bright red blossoms sprouted from the weeds when displayed on the Church’s alter and – bingo – Poinsettias were created.

In the US, 12th December is National Poinsettia Day.

Floresy’s artificial poinsettias come in either white or red colours.

 

Advent Crown

Conifers Artificial Advent Wreath

Conifers Advent Wreath Artificial Plant

The Advent Wreath or Advent Crown is a Christian tradition that represents the four weeks of Advent.

A circular wreath made from evergreen plants symbolises the Christian god’s love and eternity. One of the candles is lit on each Sunday of the four weeks of advent. Different Christian sects may use different colours of candles to match the vestments of their priests such as blue, red, violet or rose.

Sometimes, people will add a fifth candle to the advent wreath and light it on Christmas Day.

The advent wreath was made famous on the British children’s TV program, Blue Peter. The presenters made a wreath using wire coat hangers and tinsel.

Floresy’s artificial advent wreath uses conifer branches.

Artificial Christmas Wreath

Artificial Christmas Wreath Arrangement

Christmas Wreath Artificial

People have been using assortments of flowers, leaves, twigs and fruits to form rings for centuries. Wreaths are often used as decoration but people may also wear them on their heads or around their necks.

Politicians of the ancient Greco-roman world would wear laurel wreaths on their heads to represent their rank or occupation, such as a politician. Farming communities would make harvest wreaths from the leftover straw from their grain bounty.

The Christmas wreath is made using evergreen foliage and is decorated with twigs, berries or pine cones associated with winter. It has its roots in Pagan religions but has become a popular decorative addition at Christmas time too.

The artificial Christmas wreath from Floresy includes pine cones and a mixture of evergreen conifer and spruce fronds.

Potted Spruce

artificial spruce Christmas tree

Artificial spruce tree in a pot

It’s the classic Christmas tree we all know and love.

Spruce trees are members of the same family as firs and pine trees. They come from northern temperate regions of the planet. They are evergreen trees that have needles instead of leaves. Conifers, the family of trees that spruces belong to, have been growing on earth since the early Carboniferous period, which is about 300 million years ago.

The oldest living tree is believed to be a Norway spruce that is thought to be 9550 years old!

Spruce trees sometimes grow up to 60m in height. So you’ll be glad to know that Floresy’s artificial spruce trees are available in more manageable 145cm, 160cm and 180cm sizes.

Silver Winter Tree

artificial silver tree with no leaves

Artificial silver tree

If you’re looking for an alternative look for your Christmas display, why not consider this silver artificial tree? Resembling a deciduous tree in deep winter, these trees have no leaves and their bare branches are silver in colour. 

Their shimmer is a perfect addition to a winter wonderland scene but likewise, those barren branches would make for a dramatic festive look.

In the 1950s, silver Christmas trees made from aluminium gained popularity. It’s dramatically artificial look matched the era of innovation, atomic power and the dawning of the space-age. But they came to represent the over-commercialisation of Christmas and had lost their appeal by 1965.

Now, these retro trees are collector’s items and museum exhibits. Despite their bad-taste design, they are cultural icons of the hopeful and positive spirit of the 1950s.

Snow Tree

snow tree xmas

snow tree, green and snow

Floresy’s snow tree is a ready-to-display artificial Christmas tree that comes complete with lights. The thick branches covered with glossy green needles are decorated to simulate the snow-covered fronds of a forest in winter.

The tradition of bringing an evergreen branch indoors for a winter festival goes back for thousands of years. Most pagan or pre-Christian rituals would use branches or fronds of evergreen foliage fashioned into wreaths. Christianity popularised the tree tradition, most likely alongside the already accepted the pagan customs.

Prince Albert introduced the Christmas Tree tradition to the UK during Queen Victoria’s reign. Decorating trees at Christmas time had grown in fashion among the European nobles during the early 19th century. 

Before plastic tinsel and baubles, people would decorate their trees using fruits and paper flowers.

Check out Florey’s complete range of artificial Christmas trees and plants.

Japanese Forest Bathing is a thing

It isn’t surprising that forest bathing – spending time in a forest or other green space – is good for you.

Forest bathing or Shinrin yoku is becoming very popular in some countries. Countries such as Japan, in particular, take this practice very seriously.

But more than just hokem or new-age hippy-ness, there is growing scientific evidence to back up why spending time in green spaces is good for our health.

A recent analysis in the scientific journal, Environmental Research, drew on data from multiple previous studies. The combined studies tracked a total of 290 million participants from 20 different countries. The study suggested a correlation between spending time in green spaces and several health benefits:

  • Reduces stress
  • Reduces the risk of coronary heart disease
  • Lower blood pressure and cholesterol
  • Reduces risk of Type II diabetes

Above all, the participants were also more likely to describe their own health as “good”.

Why is forest bathing is good for our health?

There are many contributing factors to why spending time in green spaces is good for us. They include:

  • Promotes physical activity
  • Social interaction
  • Exposure to sunlight
  • Improved air quality

Other theories include an increased exposure to the microorganisms can strengthen the immune system. But also that particular chemicals emitted by trees may actually affect our health in different ways. Some compounds have anti-bacterial properties whilst others may actually increase the activity of our immune system.

Forest bathing as a therapy

“Green prescriptions” have been given to people with various ailments since the Victorian age. And the connection between greenery and health contributed to town planning and the addition of so many parks during the 19th century.

The NHS provides advice to their GPs on the physical and mental benefits of visiting green places. The NHS states that 6-8 months after receiving a green prescription, 63% of patients are more active and 46% have lost weight. Encouraging physical activity outside in good quality green spaces is, therefore, a valuable tool in disease prevention.

Forest Bathing and Biophilic Design

Of course, the principles behind forest bathing and biophilic design are the same. We are innately connected to nature and benefit from being close to natural things such as water and plants. Biophilic design takes these principles and incorporates them into our urban and interior spaces.

How can I incorporate forest bathing into my lifestyle?

You may already be subconsciously seeking out nature for relaxation. Going for a walk is an obvious idea but for many people living urban lives, access to good quality green spaces may be difficult. So if you’re in a pinch what can you do? Here are some ideas:

  • Listen to nature’s sounds, such as birdsong and running water, to help de-stress and relax.
  • Make sure you have greenery in the form of indoor plants or even artwork depicting natural scenes.
  • Make time at the weekend to visit a green space such as a local park or a garden that’s open to the public.

At Floresy, we understand the importance of greenery in our home and work environments. If you want to increase the greenery in your space, without increasing your water consumption or the time it takes to maintain your plants, our artificial products are here to support your needs. Give us a call today to find out how we can help.