Our Top 5 Tall Artificial Plants

The Floresy range of artificial plants and flowers includes an impressive choice of tall artificial plants including trees. Here are the Top 5 tallest-of-the-tall artificial plants from Floresy:

5. Classic Long Trunk Olive Tree 210cm

This classic long trunk olive stands at 210cm but is also available in sizes 150cm and 180cm. It’s the smart/casual of our range and can be presented in formal settings but will also elegantly sit with more informal and relaxed venues due to it’s looser topiary shape. Olive trees are often associated with Mediterranean countries and so are also great choices for restaurants specialising in cuisine from that region.

Floresy offers several trees at 210cm including this big-leaved ficus and the ever popular Dracaena Reflexa tree. You can view our range of tall artificial trees here.

Classic Long Trunk Olive Tree

Classic Long Trunk Olive Tree is 210cm

4. Kentia Palm 225cm

Kentia palms are very popular tall artificial plants. They are graceful, tropical plus they are unfussy with their simple fronds. Floresy palms are amazingly life-like and therefore they are popular additions to many offices, lobbies and foyers. Where the long trunk olive has a classic shape, this kentia palm is the classic commercial indoor plant. Little known fact: in London, you are never more than 10 feet from a Kentia Palm…

Artificial deluxe Kentia palm tree

Artificial deluxe Kentia palm tree provides a tropical feel

3. Thin Leaves Braided Trunk Ficus 250cm

Ficus are fig trees. One of the benefits of this particular product is the gnarly braided trunk. They add such realism that these trees deceptively life-like. At 250cm they are impressive by their size alone.

As with all trees, they can act as focal points. But they also work well with the architectural features of a building such as doorways or long walkways. They look especially fabulous in foyers with full height ceilings. However, even with Floresy’s industry-leading realism in the field of faux plants, these artificial fig trees don’t produce actual figs.

Thin Leaves Braided Trunk Ficus

Thin Leaves Braided Trunk Ficus

2. Amazing Braided Trunk Ficus 300cm

 Straight off the back of our thin leaves braided trunk ficus is our Amazing braided trunk ficus. This fig tree is so amazing partly because it comes in an amazing choice of seven sizes from 120cm to 300cm! Its leaves are broader than it’s cousin at No. 3 which gives it a bushier feel.

Three metres in height is a seriously tall artificial plant. So it needs careful consideration as to where it should go. If you like the idea of an impressively big tree like this but you’re working with average ceiling heights, consider using one of the smaller sizes. For a typical 2.4m ceiling height, a product of 210cm will happily fill that space without looking cramped. Three-metre products generally work best is open plan or full ceiling height spaces. 

Amazing Braided Trunk Ficus

A-maz-ing Braided Trunk Ficus

1. Joint First – Bamboo and Wisteria 300cm

Artificial bamboo remains one of our most popular plants. And this product is the tallest bamboo in our range. They’re great as screens or room dividers but at this size, we recommend them for tradeshows and exhibitions.

tall artificial plants bamboo tree

Tall Artificial Plants: bamboo tree 300 cm

Bamboo makes it to the top spot because it is such a popular product. It shares the top spot with one of our most spectacular products, a wisteria in full bloom. This tall artificial plant is probably the reserve of shopping centres or malls, exhibitions or large hotels. Can you imagine sitting under this tree in the food court of your local shopping centre? It’s spring all year round when an artificial tree is in bloom.tall artificial plant wisteria tree 300 cm

This wisteria is an impressive 300cm 

Hopefully, our Top 5 tall artificial plants have both inspired you and informed you about our range of products at Floresy. We are careful to ensure that our customers choose the right plants for their needs. If you are in any doubt about which artificial plant or tree is best for your business or client, please give us a call and we’ll help you make the most informed choice possible.

What is Interior Landscaping?

Interior landscaping is an expression in use by many interior designers who work exclusively with indoor planting schemes to describe what they do. You’ve probably heard of landscaping – the physical process of reshaping the land. Hard landscaping refers to structures such as walls, pergolas, patios and even follies. Soft landscaping is the term for the planting within the landscaped garden.

So, interior landscaping is a bit of an oxymoron. Afterall, there isn’t any land to be ‘scaped! Instead, it is the process of adding plants and greenery to work with the angles, dimensions and light inside buildings and internal structures. Perhaps ‘plantscaping‘ or ‘interiorscaping‘ are more accurate terms. All three of these expressions are rather interchangeable with businesses and designers using them to describe their own unique services.

Despite sounding trendy, the term has been in popular use within the industry for a considerable amount of time. The terms emerged in the 1970s following the publication of Richard Gain’s book ‘Interior Plantscaping‘. Some people choose to use the term exclusively for interior spaces will others use them to describe gardens within buildings.

Interior landscaping is the design and possible implementation of a planting scheme that compliments an interior space. It isn’t the maintenance of those plants although some companies will offer both these services. It also is less about a potted plant of your desk but more about structural planting that works directly with architectural details of a building. 

Examples of Interior Landscaping

Done properly, you probably won’t notice that an interior has been ‘plantscaped‘. We expect interiors in hotels, shopping centres or business foyers to have a certain look and feel.

A popular interior feature is the Green Wall or Living Walls. Usually imposing and certainly spectacular, green walls are plants grown vertically such as this example from Biotecture for Centrica’s office in Windsor.

Interior landscaping of a green wall

Interior landscaping includes impressive installations like his green wall

For large interior spaces – those with considerable ceiling height – using tall indoor plants, such as trees can be just as spectacular. Trees are ultimately architectural plants due to their size. And trees indoors certainly have the wow-factor.

Interior trees can be difficult to maintain due to how very, very thirsty they can be. Some have extensive roots systems that extend out from the trunk for almost as far as the tree is tall. So the solution is to use certain species that could be grown in containers. Or, the alternative solution to this problem is to use tall artificial plants and artificial trees indoors.

Faux Artificial interior tree

Bespoke artificial trees match your individual requirements

How does Interior Landscaping benefit me?

Interior landscaping offers the same benefits as any interior styling. Without a planting scheme, a room or building may seem off or cold and clinical. But, hey, if cold and clinical is your brand – go with that. Interiorscaping is more obvious when it is missing. Here are some of the benefits of interior landscaping:

Brand

Help define who you are and what you do from the moment someone walks into your shop or lobby. Plants and their containers can add humour, elegance or even a tropical vibe.

Ambience

The atmosphere is important in any setting. A structured, neat and uniform planting scheme will add a professional and serious note to an office or lobby. Softer planting can help people feel more relaxed and less anxious which is a great thing in a dentists waiting room.

Function

Plants can help define a room’s function: Lines of container plants will define doorways or walkways. Add discretion and privacy to areas for seating and talking by using the plants as screens or room dividers.

Wellness

Many studies conclude how important connection to nature is. It has a direct impact on the overall wellness and happiness of people working in any environment. Plants help add the greenery needed for that connection. The wellness experienced by workers leads to increases in productivity and fewer sick days.

Noice reduction

Big open spaces are echoey. You can help improve the acoustics of large spaces by adding a planting to dampen the sounds. This is great for open-plan offices and hotel lobbies. But also for busy restaurants. Less so for libraries.

Interested in learning more? Check out these posts on the benefits of artificial plants in commercial spaces and biophilic design.

Floresy has an interior landscaping offering as part of our bespoke services. By working closely with you, we will use our knowledge and experience to design a scheme that works for and for your space. Contact us today for more information on how we can help.

 

 

Is bamboo fabric really eco-friendly?

The manufacturers and retailers of bamboo clothing and textiles are singing its praises. They say this wonderfully soft fibre is so eco-friendly, you’re saving the planet just by wearing it. Too good to be true? Probably.

Following our recent blog post on the sustainability of bamboo as a wood alternative, we are looking at bamboo fabric with the same objectivity. So what do we already know about bamboo as a fabric?

  • Bamboo fabric is super soft, strong and lightweight.
  • It has good drape characteristics and allows the skin to breath making it ideal for clothing.
  • Bamboo also imparts it’s absorbent and anti-bacterial properties into its fabric form which is great for medical uses.
  • Plus textiles made from bamboo require less energy to wash and dry than other natural fibres.

Doesn’t that all sound fabulous so far? It almost reads like an advert from a retailer of bamboo clothing…

However, as with any resource or product, we need to look at the entire process – from harvesting to retailing – to understand the impact on the environment. It’s worth noting at this point that nothing has zero impact. When you cut down a tree or harvest a cotton crop there is an energy cost and direct effect on the immediate environment (“Hey, where’s my tree gone?” said the squirrel). Among other things, sustainability considers how that cost is balanced against providing income and education for farm workers and how easy it is to replace or regrow a resource.

Eco-recap on growing bamboo

Whilst there are energy costs associated in its transportation, the production of bamboo can be super-sustainable:

  • It grows at a fast rate, absorbing C02 from the atmosphere as it matures.
  • Growing in its natural environment, bamboo does not require irrigation or pesticides.
  • Bamboo production supports small-scale farming in areas that are too inaccessible for large machinery.
  • It has a larger utilised biomass than cotton i.e. more product per plant per acre.
  • Once harvested, bamboo continues to grow so there is less destruction that leads to soil erosion.

Well, this sounds even better! Bamboo is great to grow and its great to wear. Sign me up!

But between plant and product, there is a significant area that needs exploring before bamboo can claim it’s eco-credentials.

Turning bamboo into fabric

Bamboo is not naturally soft. It’s a hard, woody plant that requires significant processing to turn into a textile. There are two methods for this: chemical and mechanical.

Chemical production of bamboo fabric

Those of you currently wearing any bamboo clothing may wish to slip into something with a higher cotton content whilst reading this.

The leaves and stalks of bamboo are effectively cooked-up in a vat of toxic chemicals including carbon disulfide, chlorine and sulfuric acid. Because it isn’t a closed loop system, the resulting cocktail, that is a risk to the environment, gets into waterways and landfills. Plus, these chemicals pose serious health hazards, including neural disorders, for the workers employed in the manufacture of bamboo fabric using this method.

Great.

This manufacturing process is neither eco-friendly nor sustainable. And it’s this method that produces the silky soft, wearable fabric that gets bamboo all that positive attention.

Mechanical production of bamboo fabric

Good news is that the mechanical method is more eco-friendly than the chemical method (but it would be difficult not to be). The bad news is that it is more expensive. The woody bamboo is crushed and left to ferment in a mushy mess using natural enzymes that break down the fibrous structures. The natural fibres are then mechanically drawn out and spun into yarn. This process is basically the same for making textiles from flax or hemp and the result is a linen-like fabric. It’s labour intensive and produces a low yield of fabric.

The reality is the vast majority of bamboo textile is not organic. Or at least any claim it has in being a truly organic fibre has limitations. Bamboo fibre can be organic – but it’s rare, expensive and unlikely to be fully traceable.

Bamboo and China

Any commodity, where it’s production is overwhelmingly dependant on China is not sustainable. China has one of the most unregulated markets in the world and hardly the best track record on workers rights. Plus a significant pollution problem. So even if bamboo is a better crop for the environment that does not automatically make it sustainable. At least not yet. China is stepping up with new environmental policies, mostly in response to the smog issues across its cities. So perhaps there is hope yet for Chinese bamboo to save us all. If only if wasn’t on the other side of the planet…

Here’s a handy infographic on bamboo

bamboo sustainable infographic

Bamboo infographic

It’s easy to be defeatist. Trying to make good, sustainable choices for our businesses and personal selves sometimes feels impossible. We, as consumers, often only have access to the information that retailers want us to know about their products. The result is we are sometimes left feeling naive, conned or like a failure when we’ve tried so hard to make the right choice.

But the positive in all this is just that – choice. Is bamboo fabric a better choice for the environment than organic cotton from a fair trade source? Maybe, maybe not. Is it better than polyester? Yes. Can bamboo production help protect deforestation in South America? Yes. Is the farming of bamboo across China likely (if not already) to be exploited if the west continues to view bamboo as a magic bullet? Probably. Is it a competition of bamboo vs cotton? No. Is it about making informed decisions? Yes.

The use of bamboo is a step in the right direction. It shows we are looking for alternatives. But bamboo, certainly for European consumers, shouldn’t be considered the final destination of that search. It’s a stepping stone in our journey towards sustainability.

 

Sofitel Case Study: Solving an unsightly view

Project: Sofitel (5-star, 183 room hotel)

Location: Waterloo, London

Brief:

  1. Replace existing planting but retain the planters
  2. Screen unsightly view of the machine room and piping from bedrooms

Products used:


At Floresy, we understand the importance of creating the right customer experience for hoteliers. Especially 5-star establishments in central London. The apparently effortless transition by your staff of guests from the lobby to bedrooms to function rooms is mirrored by the same high-standard of decor, cleanliness and amenities in every space in your hotel.  However, the reality of running any 24-hour hospitality business is that, behind the scenes, it’s a lot less glamorous.

Sometimes this means substituting an unsightly view from a window with a far more attractive and pleasing alternative.

Our solutions

The brief for this project was two-fold with the first objective being replacing the existing – but tired – artificial planting whilst retaining the planters. As we both design and manufacture artificial plants we are able to create planting solutions for any problem area in a client’s brief. So using planters and containers of the client’s preference was easy. This area is outside one of the hotel’s many function rooms. Restricted access to this awkward space means maintenance would be an issue for real plants.

Our bespoke artificial tree and plant arrangements in the clients existing containers. These displays are uplit for added nighttime atmosphere.

Can you tell the difference? Floresy’s artificial plants are of the highest standard.

Next, objective number two was a larger roof area overlooked by several bedrooms. One of the benefits of using plants as room dividers or screens is they do not completely block the light. And this is an important consideration for any screen solution for a window when detracting from an unsightly view.

Our green walls make great screens and because they are freestanding, they are a perfect solution for this situation. They are easy to install in addition to not blocking all of the natural light coming into a room. 

What lies behind: solving the unsightly view.

The result is much better

For other bedrooms overlooking the roof, the use of low-level window boxes as an attractive feature was sufficient in order to maintain the illusion of a swan.

Our bespoke wooden box hedges in situ

Our conclusion

The project is a success with both satisfied customer and supplier. We are looking forward to working with Sofitel again soon.

If you have a similar unsightly sight at your premises, you can read more about how Floresy can help. Alternatively, give us a call on 0208 0770891 to speak to one of our helpful customer managers.