Amazing Designs using Interior Trees

The last place you expect to find a tree is indoors. Except of course in stunning interiors! A design that incorporates interior trees will make their guests feel welcome and ever-so-special. The addition of an interior tree will have the wow-factor for the very reasons that they are an unexpected addition to a room. Lavish botanicals will create an atmosphere completely different from the street or climate outside. Use them to set a room apart from the rest of a hotel, restaurant or bar by defining a room’s specific and unique character.

 

Interior Tree Designs

Light bright interior tree design

A light and fresh appeal in contrast to the dark and moody bar area.

Large stone planters on plinths add even greater height to these trees in the Ugly Duckling, Melbourne. The result is a light, bright and fresh feel to the restaurant – a stark comparison to the oak and dark blues of the proceeding bar area (not pictured).

Silver birch interior trees

Ethos uses silver birch trees as a design focal point

Ethos restaurant in London uses silver birch tree trunks to create this amazing interior. The unique bark of the trees echoes the marble table tops. The overall design gives an organic and bountiful-nature aspect that reflects the quality of the produce used on this vegetarian restaurant’s menu. 

Interior trees and decorations

A joyous combination of tree leaves and paper-chain ceiling decorations.

There are several interior trees in play at the Weranda Lunch & Wine restaurant in Pozna, Poland. Combine them with many plants, planters and table flowers plus the extraordinary paper-chain ceiling decorations and the result is magical.

 

Multiple plants and interior trees

Rich and warm interior of the Dishroom in Shoreditch

Whilst there are no actual trees in the Dishroom in Shoreditch, London, the lush ferns on tall plant stands are doing a grand job. The restaurant uses an eclectic mix of the dark-toned wooden furniture, leafy plants, and beige upholstery. Add the ropes-covered pillars, brick and bare plaster walls and the overall effect is kind of hipster-colonialism.

Interior Trees at night

Central interior tree design

Seating around the trunk allows you to site under the canopy.

The wonderfully-named Woolloomooloo Wharf hotel in Sydney has seating area constructed around one of its focal trees (plus compulsory kitsch pink flamingoes). The canopy has fairy lights decorating the branches making it a delightful space to sit and sip.

Interior trees with lights

1920s glamour at the refurbished Refuge in Manchester.

The Refuge, Manchester glamourous refurbishment includes a Winter Garden. Combining classy black and white tiles with a palette of soft greens, it has a decadent yet relaxed feel evocative of the 1920s. A great tip when adding an impressive interior tree is to also add lighting. The room can be transformed once more at night when the lighting is switched on.

Interior tree with lights

Who would have thought Disneyland could be classy?

The Starbucks at Disneyland demonstrates the lighted tree at night. Surprisingly stylish given its theme park location, a bench seat encircles the tree creating seating for multiple tables. Plus the fairy lights are certainly worthy of any Disney princess.

Artifical Tall Trees at Floresy

Floresy offers a bespoke design service for larger-scale artificial trees. Whether it’s oak, acacia or baobab, each tree is custom-made to the customer’s specifications. Suitable for indoor or outdoor use, our trees are durable, weather-proof and fully protected against UV fading and damage.

Faux Artificial interior tree

Floresy artificial trees are custom built to match your requirements

Each tree can be built to match very specific requirements. They can have an exact height, canopy size or even an unusual shape to frame an architectural feature such as a door or window. And once installed they require no additional maintenance and will look fabulous all year round. Our design team are here to help create you the perfect tree.

To speak to one of our design consultants, please call 0208 0770891 or fill out the contact form on our Artificial Tall Tree page.

 

Define doorways using this simple design trick

First impressions really do count when your business relies on attracting customers from the street – whether you are a retailer or in the hospitality trade. So the most important area of business premises is, therefore, the doorway. In one cursory glance from a passer-by, you need to be able to communicate what your business is and who your clients are.

A very popular technique for defining the entrance to your premises is to use a pair of trees or plants. Placing the plants in matching containers either side of the door or porch will demark and frame the doorway. Whether you use boxwood or olive or whether it’s a standard or a natural shape, it’s a quick and easy to achieve a polished look.

Traditional and formal doorways

Nothing creates a traditional, elegant and refined look to an entranceway like a topiary of classic clipped boxwood. Symmetry is important with any formal look. These plain grey planters, neat box and black door make an imposing and professional entranceway.

It is not an inviting look. It suggests authority and power and that only a select few may enter. Perfect for a members-only club.

Formal Front Door with boxwood trees

Neat boxwood, grey planters and a big black door.

 

Executive hotels also want to appear exclusive but need a softer image to invite in the right kind of clientele. The Marignan Hotel in Paris uses these impressive planters to create a more contemporary look to this very formal entrance. Doubling up on the pairs of plants doubles the impact. And having a doorman is always impressive too.

Marignan Hotel Paris Entranceway

A very impressive facade at the Marignan in Paris

Modern and clean doorways

When you are a retailer, attracting customers in from the street is crucial to your success. Framing a doorway with symmetrical planting will give a sophisticated look but it also needs to be inviting. 

The Hudson Grace store in San Fransisco uses a classic-shaped topiary to frame the door whilst retaining a modern, clean look.

Classic contemporary topiary Doorway

Hudson Grace Shop Front Doorway with a classic yet contemporary topiary

This Dior shop front still conveys sophistication and refinery. However, the harsh formal look is softened by the addition of the pretty whites flowers and the wooden planters. The coordinating pale grey and white painted shop front echoes the tones of the wooden planters and flowers.

Dior Shop Front Doorway

The formal yet appealing image helps attract customers into your shop.

Warm and homely doorways

Humble Pie Whitby Doorway

Humble Pie shop in Whitby uses galvanised tin planters

So, the severity of this formal look is easily adapted to create a warm and inviting exterior. Combine the main tree or shrub with flowers. Change the planter for something informal. Humble Pie in Whitby (above) uses galvanised tin planters to decorate their shop front. Adapting the classic look by placing both trees central to the shop window, most likely due to space. Serena Lily’s home decor store uses re-purposed beer barrels as planters. This hotel in Province, Crillon le Brave, uses worn terracotta pots. The black and white shop front (photo by Mackenzie Horan) uses wooden containers in black to match the awning. The planting is softened by sweet little colourful flowers.

Standard Trees available at Floresy

Floresy design, make and sell a variety of trees perfect for use defining any doorway:

This classic long trunk olive at 210cm tall will add an instant wow factor to any premises entrance. Perfect on its own in an equally impressive container.

The Croton Artificial Tree has a unique appearance with a variegated leaf tinged with brown for a very natural look. It comes in two heights (150cm and 180cm) and would be great for a relaxed and tropical style restaurant.

The fabulous Ginkgo tree is 190cm and has an interesting leaf shape and a vibrant mid-green colour. It has a sunny feel and would be perfect for any cheerful and happy shop front.

One of Floresy’s many Ficus trees, this particularly bushy product is 120cm and would create a traditional topiary look, outside a hotel or office building.

 

,

How to use plants as room dividers

Plants are a must-have accessory for any interior but their use need not be purely decorative. Large open plan spaces such as lobbies, offices and restaurants often need to define areas or zones. This may be waiting areas, eating areas or different teams in an office. Using plants as room dividers allow spaces to be kept light and open whilst still defining the boundary.

1. Pot Plants on Free Standing Shelves

Free standing shelves pot plants

insideout.com.au plants on free-standing shelves as room dividers

insideout.com.au use multiple smaller plants on a free-standing shelf unit to create this effective room divider. The combination of the boxy lines of the shelves with the lush and leafy plants creates a definite but soft divide that maximises the greenery on display.

Light can still travel through the shelves and the space remains open and welcoming. Tantalising glimpses of what is on the other side can be had through the gaps in the leaves. Yet the physicality of the shelves keeps the zones separate.

This principle works well in an office or a restaurant area where space needs to be distinct but still remain communal and social.

free-standing shelves with potted plants creates an airy room divide

Conclusion Office by DZAP free-standing shelves with potted plants creates an airy room divider

DZAP, Heerlen fluently demonstrates the same principle in this project for Conclusion Office (as featured on retaildesignblog.net). Here, the ratio of plant to shelf space is smaller granting an even greater sense of transparency. The seating area is defined but open and remains connected to the rest of the interior.

It’s a very versatile look: swap or combine the plants with ceramics or books to change the look from leafy and fresh to thoughtful and contemplative. This style, evocative of art galleries and libraries, would also suit an urban coffee house.

Get the look:

Combine open, free-standing shelving units with Floresy’s ferns in galvanised pots. Or if capitalising on the mystery beyond the barrier interests you, why not try these herbs in glass pots that allow even more light to pass through. 


2. Low divides for seated areas

Room dividers need not be high level. In an office, where everyone is typically seated, the divide can be kept lower. This maximises the sense of space and makes for easier quick conversations over the dividers promoting communication and collaboration among workers.

This also works well for waiting areas and lobbies. Clients are able to sit and relax whilst striking the right balance between feeling suitably private but not hidden (and likely to be forgotten or missed).

This display from idealhome.co.uk uses the same principle in a living space. But the same set-up would look at home in a trendy office environment (maybe even the shoes). Plus the use of cupboards also offers much-needed storage space adding practicality to ornamentation.

Low room divider with large leaf plants

Low room divider with large leaf plants also provides storage

In this Miami hotel lounge, designed by Meyer Davis, the use of plant room dividers in the seating area is subtle but effective. Sitting on the pristine white sofas, the delicate fronds of the ferns are just high enough to give privacy. But also low enough so as to not distract from the height of the featured, painted banyan tree trunks.

 

Meyer Davis designed hotel lounge

Hotel lounge uses low planting to offer seated privacy.

Get the look:

Floresy offers many choices of plants and trees that would look great as a low-level room divider. The bushy nature of these Schefflera plants is perfect for creating screens.

Choose a low-level container to place on the ground or a trough-style planter if positioning on top of low storage furniture.

Or why not go retro with these floor standing small bamboo trees? At 120cm and in an attractive pot they are tall enough to provide a screen when seated.

 


3. Use trees to create impact and atmosphere

Often the use of trees indoors is to create a central or focal point to a lobby or other large space. But here, the small and medium-sized trees create a seating zone, offer privacy and form an attractive feature. Clusters of palms of varying height and variety create a lavish and tropical screen in this hotel lobby at the EDITION hotel, Miami. The elegant white planters reflect the white marble floors and light coloured upholstery.

Trees in hotel lobby

Miami Beach Edition lobby creates impact and atmosphere using trees.

Broad-leafed trees at Sony Music Entertainment’s Amsterdam HQ create a secluded spot in the corner of their office. The palette of greens and soft turquoises in the furnishings and planters blend to create a peaceful sea-green oasis.

The room dividers here are less of a physical barrier and offer more of a screen. So move through the trees and enter the seclusion under the canopy of exotic leaves.

Broad leafed trees and plants offer seclusion in an open plan office

Broad-leafed trees and plants offer seclusion in an open plan office

 

Get the look:

This deluxe Kentia palm tree at 225cm adds an instant tropical yet relaxed feel to an interior. Also available in smaller sizes. The palm combines beautifully with the big, waxy leaves of the Alocasia Calidora. The generous leaf size lends itself to creating privacy. Finish the look with a selection of stylish containers from Floresy’s range of planters and pots.